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Full text of "The highland churchman. [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C283 

H63 

v. 19-21 

1948-1951 



UN'VERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



7499 



000427 



FOR USE ONLY IN 
THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/highlandchurchma38epis 






tM|tgF)lanb 
CrjttrcJjman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
VOL. XIX MAY, 1948 NO. 1 







APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION 

YOUNG CHURCHMAN'S CAMP 

Patterson School 

June 6th- 12th 

I hereby apply for registration in the Diocesan Young Church- 
man's Camp at Patterson School, June 6-12, 1948. I enclose $1.00 
registration feee. and will bring an additional $6.00 to cover the 
entire cost. 

Check which: Boy ( ) Girl ( ) 

Name 

Age 

Address 



Parent's signature indicating consent 

(Or Guardian) 

Episcopal Clergyman's signature 

indicating recommendation 



ENROLL NOW! 



®tjr ipgtjlanfc 
ffijjurrljman 

Box 55 Vcrlle Cnicis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Pastor Pastorum 

If there were any in the Diocese who 
still needed to be convinced, the situa- 
tion here since the first of January 
should be proof that ours is an episcopal 
Church. We should all known by now 
that "Episcopal Church" means a 
Church led by a bishop. We should all 
know by now that forward action in the 
furtherance of God's work along broad 
diocesan lines depends upon the leader- 
ship, vision, and inspiration of a shep- 
herd of shepherds, a Father-in-God and 
ruler of the diocesan family. 

To so state is not intended to demean 
in any wise the service which has been 
rendered the Diocese by its Standing 
Committee. Many problems have arisen 
which have called for more frequent 
meetings and decisions which have not 
always been easy to make. The mem- 
bers of the Committee have been called 
upon to sacrifice much time from their 
parishes and businesses in order to de- 
vote themselves to the work of the 
Diocese. This they have done and have 
acquitted themselves well in so doing. 

Yet we must face the fact that any 
ecclesiastical authority other than the 



bishop of a diocese is, and can only be, 
an interim authority. And where there 
is interim authority there will always be 
the natural reluctance to make decisions 
which will have long range effects. Cler- 
gymen who have been supply-priests, 
and churches which have had temporary 
rectors will know what we are talking 
about when we say there is a feeling 
abroad in the Diocese of impermanence 
and lack of striving for an attainable 
goal. In sum: we have been marking 
time, not through anyone's fault or de- 
sire, but simply because we have no 
other choice in a Church which is de- 
pendent on the leadership of a divinely 
commissioned bishop. 

With the election and acceptance of a 
Bishop and Shepherd, let us cease mark- 
ing time and move forward under God's 
guidance to accomplish those things He 
has set for us to do. 



The Youth Camp 

Almost unknown to the Diocese, there 
exists a small band of heroes who every 
year offer their bodies, minds and spirits 
in sacrifice to the cause of strengthening 
the work of the Church. True, their 
sufferings are not of long duration, only 
one week out of the entire year, but 
while it lasts, the torture is intense. You 
will find their names writ small in the 
column by Helen Thomas when she lists 
the faculty for the Youth Camp at Pat- 
terson. 

Some sage is purported to have said, 
"Youth is such a wonderful thing that 
it is a shame to waste it on young peo- 
ple." We have no doubt that this was 
said from the heart after the sage had 
spent a week in trying to keep up with 
some sixty or seventy kids whose energy 
is exceeded only by the powers of in- 
ventiveness they show in wearing out 
the older fry. 

Yet all who attend the Diocesan 
Camp, youth and doddering age alike, 
recognize the benefits of such a venture. 
There is no other single agency within 
our diocesan life which holds such 
promise for the future binding together 
of the Diocese into an active and for- 
ward-moving Church. 



The Minimum and The Maximum 

By the Rev. R. K. Yerkes 
Director, Christian Education, Diocese of Chicago 

After many public performances in our Church, such as meetings of Conven- 
tions, we often think that conditions are little short of chaotic. But when the 
tumult and shouting have died and deputies have returned to he more prosaic 
work of exemplifying and spreading he Christian religion, there remains the con- 
viction that we do constitute a single Church and not an aggregation of disparate 
societies. 

When our canons give us the long phrase, "Doctrine, Discipline and Worship 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America," they infer 
that thfj phrase defines something which exists and not merely an idea to be greatly 
desirea'. They also infer that this doctrine, discipline and worship can be definitely 
ascertained and applied as a measuring standard for the belief, worship and 
practice of the communicants of our Church. 

The same idea is expressed in the Ministration of Holy Baptism when sponsors 
are required to pledge that they will "take heed that this child learn the Creed, the 
Lord's Prayer and the Ten Commandments, and all other things which a Christian 
ought to know and believe to his soul's health." 

The creeds declare the minimum of doctrine; the Lord's Prayer describes the 
minimum of worship; the Ten Commandments define the minimum of discipline 
in the Church. The "other things which a Christian ought to know" apparently 
embrace such details as doctrine, discipline and worship which exceed the minimum 
and which are recognized in our Church as necessary to the health of a Christian 
soul. 

Thus, in both the canons and the Prayer Book is established a difference be- 
tween the minimum and maximum. When this difference is ignored confusion 
results. Definitions always describe a minimum requirement, a sort of lowest 
"pass mark." 

For example, the Holy Communion is not mentioned in the creeds, but it is 
certainly a basic factor of our teaching. It is quite additional to the Lord's Prayer, 
but it is certainly our most important act of worship; nearly half the Book of 
Common Prayer is concerned with its ministration. It cannot even be inferred 
from the Ten Commandments but, without question, our Church considers some- 
thing to be lacking in the life of him who declines to receive Holy Communion. 

The minimum-for-maximum attitude is especially noticeable in attempts to 
make a single organization of all those who profess and call themselves Christians. 
By whittling requirements of worship and creed and behavior to a minimum we 
seem to be striving for a sort of greatest common divisor. By raising this minimum 
to a maximum we hope to glue together all who can assent to it, even if their 
tongues are in their cheeks. The result might be a huge institution which would 
go the way of all huge institutions, vix., the way of the ichthiosaurus. 

One of the chief needs of the Church today is the clarification of the uncertainty 
attached to what a Christian ought to know and believe and practice to his soul's 
health. We do not seem to realize that contentment with the minimum in any realm 
invariably results in degeneration of standards. We also do not always realize 
that inability to compose a Beethoven Sonata does not disqualify one for the study 
of music. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Elizabeth Van Noppen 

The District Meetings, held during 
the second week in April, were most 
successful this year, from the standpoint 
of attendance, but more particularly 
from the standpoint of reports of work 
accomplished. These reports reflected 
the planning and work of busy church- 
women throughout the Diocese, each 
branch having found its particular way 
of meeting its own needs, and the calls 
from the outside. The work of the very 
small parishes is remarkable, and could 
put some of the larger parishes to shame. 

It is interesting to watch these groups 
of church people grow. Each year there 
is present, of course, the group of older 
women who have served their parishes 
and the diocese so faithfully, and who 
are still at it, but most gratifying is the 
addition of so many younger women. 

Aside from the reports of the branch- 
es, which seemed so excellent this year, 
of the Diocesan officers, and of our 
president, the women were privileged to 
hear Mrs. D. D. Tabor, of Saluda, re- 
tired Field Officer to the National Coun- 
cil. Mrs. Tabor talked informally and 
helpfully on many phases of the Auxil- 
iary work. She told of Seabury House, 
stressing the fact that it and "281" be- 
long to each of us. She rather cautioned 
the women to remember that the Auxil- 
iary should function as an auxiliary — 
an aid and helper to the rector and the 
church. Another excellent suggestion 
,vas that we form the habit of following 
jp our U.T.O. and other offerings, and 
learn where they are spent, and what 
they do. 

The following paragraph is taken 
from the report of the Second District, 
and is very timely: 



'Tn closing, Miss Aline Cronshey, 
District Director, gave the meeting a 
lesson in courtesy, which, sad to relate, 
is needed in almost every gathering of 
church people. The supreme worship 
service of the church is that of Holy 
Corporate Communion, and all serious 
church gatherings are and should be 
begun with a Corporate Communion. 
However, many of us have become so 
lax in our courtesy towards God that 
we no longer think it necessary f o be at 
church at the appointed time; the devo- 
tions of the faithful are interrupted by 
our late arival, thus adding discourtesy 
to our fellows to our discourtesy to God. 
Those who missed Corporate Commun- 
ion will think on these things before 
another meeting." 



The most important occasion imme- 
diately ahead of us is the Annual Meet- 
ing at Kanuga on June 3rd and 4th. 
Miss Fletcher's plans are not yet com- 
plete, but she has announced that the 
principal speaker will be Bishop John 
Boyd Bentley, D. D., who retired from 
his wor kas Bishop to Alaska to take 
over the Department of Foreign Mis- 
sions on the National Council. 

Plan now to attend all or a part of 
this meeting. The first session will be- 
gin at two o'clock on Thursday, June 
3rd. 



Another date to keep in mind is the 
Patterson Camp on June 6th-12th. Re- 
member that there may be a boy or 
girl, or both, in your parish who would 
love to go if means were provided. 



St. Mary's Auxiliary, Quaker Mead- 
ows, held a Bazaar in April which at- 
tracted people from all the Meadows 
section, as well as main - from Morgan- 
ton. Canned and cooked foods, and 
hand-made articles were sold, cakes were 



auctioned, and the Virginia Reel was 
enjoyed by young and old. This small 
auxiliary branch of only nine members 
was one of the very few in the Diocese 
to contribute 100 per cent to the United 
Thank Offering. 



The Spring Meeting of the Second 
District took place in the Church of the 
Transfiguration, Bat Cave, on April 15th 
with 65 persons present. 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins opened with 
Family Morning Prayer and an address 
on "Recreation" in which he pointed out 
that part of God's work which should 
be done through the Woman's Auxiliary 
is that of recreation for our children and 
young people. 

The offering to assist women of the 
Fifth District to attend summer leader- 
ship conference samounted to $33. Af- 
ter reports from each branch and dioces- 
an officer present, the Rev. William T. 
Capers, Jr., said noonday prayers. 



Report To Be Delayed 

The financial report for the first quar- 
ter from each parish and mission will be 
delayed due to the illness of Mr. William 
Redwood, Treasurer of the Diocese. Mr. 
Redwood was forced to undergo an op- 
eration recently, and it was not possible 
for him to do the work necessary in 
getting out the report. 

The Executive Council has made it 
mandatory for The Highland Church- 
man to publish a report concerning the 
apportionments and assessments at least 
three times a year. These three reports 
are to be in addition to a final report 
for each full year. 

If Mr. Redwood's health allows, a re- 
port will be printed in the June issue of 
The Highland Churchman. 



born on Easter Day. The Rev. Mr, 
Gribbin is Chaplain at Kenyon College, 
Gambier, Ohio, rector of Harcourt Par- 
ish, Gambier, and vicar of St. John 
Baptist, Bedell Chapel. 

The Rev. Mr. Gribbin may be remem- 
bered by some as a postulant and can- 
didate from this Diocese, the son of the 
former Bishop of the Diocese, a frequent 
visitor to Kanuga, sometime chaplain to 
the students at the University of North 
Carolina, and a brother to Mrs. I. N. 
Northup of Biltmore, N. C. Mrs. Grib- 
bin was the former Miss Elsie Lawrence 
of Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Bishop Gribbin Now In 
Columbia, S. C. 

The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, re- 
tired Bishop of this Diocese, is now 
locum tenens at Trinity Church, Col- 
umbia, S. C. Bishop Gribbin accepted 
the post as temporary rector of the 
parish on the 18th of April, succeeding 
the Rt. Rev. Louis A. Melcher, who until 
his election as Bishop Coadjutor of 
Southern Brazil, was rector of Trinity 
Church. Bishop Gribbin has agreed to 
stay in Columbia through the summer 
unless a rector is secured. 



Vital Statistics 

The Rev. Emmet Gribbin and Mrs. 
Gribbin are the parents of a son, Joseph, 



NEW RECTOR AT WAYNESVILLE 

BAT CAVE GETS SUPPLY 

Two vacancies in the Diocese have re- 
cently been filled by the appointment of 
the Rev. Edgar Goold for Waynesville 
and the Rev. J. X. Atkins as supply 
priest at Bat Cave. 

The Rev. Air. Goold, formerly Presi- 
dent of St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, 
assumed the rectorship of Grace Church 
and has entered upon his duties there. 

Fr. Atkins, who is supplying at Bat 
Cave, is the associate rector of St. Luke^ 
Church, Richmond, Va. 



Young Churchmen's News 



By Helen Thomas 



For the second time, I sit down to 
write you the same bit of news. I had 
just heaved a big sigh of relief that my 
article was written, when I received a 
card from Fr. Leach, telling me that my 
news had been edited out of existence 
by two small children, aged two and 
three. Since that is something that 
can't be helped, it won't hurt me to 
make another stab at what I want to 
tell you. 

Naturally, it will be about Patterson 
Camp that I wish to tell you. Who is 
to be there, for instance. First of all, 
there is the Director, The Rev. Charles 
Leavell from Morganton. Mr. Leavell 
has been to Patterson every year since 
it started, and he has brought with him 
the biggest group of young people than 
has any other church. Let's see if we 
can't get up enough enthusiasm in our 
groups to give him a little competition; 
Not that we don't want all of his young 
people to come — we just want all of you 
to come. Next, we have the Vice-Direc- 
tor, the Rev. Mark Jenkins from Fletch- 
er. "Parson" Jenkins has also been to 
Patterson every year, and he has been 
Director, Vice-Director and Chaplain at 
different times. And speaking of Chap- 
lains, this year we will have with us 
the Rev. Ralph Webster, from Ruther- 
fordton, who will do the preaching for 
the first time. It will be his first trip 
to Patterson, as he is fairly new in the 
Diocese. Before he came to Western 
North Carolina, Mr. Webster was in 
Puerto Rico. If he tells us anything of 
his experience there, and I am sure he 
will, then we are sure to enjoy every 
minute of his sermons. 

Among others who will be at Patter- 
son on the faculty are The Rev. Robert 
Campbell, who many of you know from 
the Youth Convention which was held 
in Morganton last fall. Mrs. Campbell 
will also be with us as counsellor to the 
girls. The Rev. Howard Rhys will be 



another familiar figure around camp. 
And last, but not least, will be The Rev. 
Father Leach, with the Sinatra voice, 
hillbilly style, of course. 

Doesn't it sound like a grand group 
of teachers to have? Of course the en- 
tire day will not be taken up with teach- 
ing and learning. We have classes in 
the morning, after we have had break- 
fast, gone to service, and cleaned our 
rooms. We will only have two classes 
this year, but we will see movies and 
have a seminar lecture following. Lunch, 
which is always a hearty meal, served 
by Mr. Wiese's staff in the kitchen, is 
followed by the traditional rest hour, 
and after this the fun really begins. We 
can play basketball, softball, tennis, or 
volleyball. After this comes swimming, 
and then it's time to eat again. The 
evening programs come after supper and 
the church service, which is usually held 
in the little Chapel of Rest on the hill. 
The programs are put on by the dif- 
ferent groups, and are sometimes given 
inside and followed by a square dance, 
or are sometimes in the form of a camp- 
fire session. These campfire programs 
are always so interesting that the cows 
in the nearby pasture come over to join 
us. 

Now the question that always arises 
is this: What to take? You will need 
your Bible, Prayer Book, notebook and 
pencils. You will need to take sheets, 
blankets, and a pillow if you must have 
one. We do not dress up while we are 
there. Bring as many play clothes as 
you think you will need for a week, any 
musical instrument that you can play, 
so that you can help your group in the 
program planning, and a flash light, so 
you can see to go to the chapel and to 
the campfire ground. 

Well, this is about all the help I can 
give you regarding camp, except to say 



that I do hope you will be able to come. 
See you Sunday, June 6, I hope. 



The courses at Patterson Camp have 
been worked out by the Director and 
Vice-Director, the Rev. R. B. Camp- 
bell, as follows: Old Testament, Prayer 
Book, and Life of Christ, first period; 
Church Membership, Vocations, and 
Practical Y.P.S.L. in the second period; 
a seminar on Missions will be held dur- 
ing the third period. Registrations may 
yet be made by sending name, address, 
age (over 13). parents' and rector's en- 
dorsement. Send registrations to the 
Rev. C. G. Leavell, Morganton, X. C. 
After May 15th, registrations will be 
open to non-Episcopalians as well as to 
Young Churchmen. 



Young Churchmen will have an op- 
portunity to take part in an Acolytes' 
Festival which will be held at St. Mary's 
Church, Asheville. on Trinity Sunday. 
May 23rd. The service will begin at 
4 P. M. and the avolytes from all par- 
ishes and missions in the Diocese are 
cordially invited. Notice of intention to 
attend should be sent as soon as possible 
to the rector of St. Mary's, the Rev. Gale 
D. Webbe, 339 Charlotte St., Asheville. 



Pages To Be Limited 

The Highland Churchman, official 
organ of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, announces that it is forced to 
curtail the number of pages for each 
issue. Lack of enough well paying ad- 
vertising accounts is given as the reason 
for limiting the number of pages to 
twelve per issue instead of the sixteen 
which have been printed. This will 
mean that most news of General Church 
interest will have to be omitted, and 
space will be limited to educational ar- 
ticles. It is hoped that this will have 
to be only a temporary measure, and 
that more advertisements may be secur- 
ed from accounts in towns in the Diocese 
other than Asheville. 



Morganton Convocation 
Lenten Offering 

About 125 persons from 14 parishes 
and missions attended the Presentation 
of the Lenten Offering held in Grace 
Church, Morganton, at 11:00 A. M. 
April 10th. The Very Rev. Peter W. 
Lambert, Dean of the Convocation, had 
charge of the service at which a com- 
bined Junior Choir filled the choir stalls 
to overflowing. The Rev. YY. C. Leach 
spoke on the importance of giving 
thoughtfully and prayerfully. A total 
of $546.64 was presented, $10.81 less 
than the offering in 1947. St. John's 
Church School, Marion, won the banner 
for the highest per capita giving of $1.60. 
Followin gthe service a motion picture 
was shown entitled "For All People", 
in which the central theme was that our 
Lord is for peoples of all races. Box 
picnic lunch was then served on the 
Parish House lawn. In a brief after- 
noon session the Rev. Peter \V. Lambert 
was re-elected Dean of the Convocation, 
and the Rev. W. C. Leach was elected 
Secretary. A motion was passed to have 
the next presentation service on Sunday 
afternoon when it was pointed out that 
several churches were unable to attend 
on Saturday. 



Quarterly Report from "281" 
Shows W. N. C. Arrears 

The statement of amounts received by 
the National Council Treasurer to April 
1st, shows the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina in arrears. According to this 
report, the expectations due from the 
Diocese was $1,196.67 and the amount 
paid to April 1st was $615. Allowing 
one month for collections in the parishes 
and dioceses, there should be paid by 
April 1, a minimum of one-sixth of the 
"Expectations" of each diocese. 

The April issue of The Highland 
Churchman carried a letter from Mr. 
Redwood, Treasurer of the Diocese, in 
which he pointed out that in order for 
him to meet diocesan obligations there 
should be prompt payment on the part 
of parishes and missions. 



Ascension, Hickory, Has 
Confirmation 

Plans are well underway now for a 
new church in Hickory. Preliminary 
sketches have been drawn, a spacious 
lot given, and $30,000.00 pledged to be 
paid by May 1, 1948. Cash on hand, 
only a part of which is pledges already 
paid, amounts to about $\ 1,000.00. The 
Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, D. D., vis- 
ited Ascension the evening of April 11th 
and confirmed seven persons: Susan 
Hand Browne, Frankie Irene Burns, 
Nellie Faye Burns, Joseph Carroll Cobb, 
Lucretia Anne Fennell, Betty Lee Short, 
William Egleston Whitener. Several 
memorials were blessed Easter Day: 
a chalice and paten in memory of the 
Rev. Samuel Bradley Stroup, given by 
Mrs. Samuel Bradley Stroup and their 
children; offertory plates and a Bap- 
tismal bowl in memory of Aurora and 
Henry Perdue, given by their daughters, 
Mrs. W. J. Burns, Mrs. Clarence V. 
Baker, and Mrs. E. F. Bargei. 



St. Francis', Rutherfordton, 
Installs Hymnals 

On Easter Day the new 1940 Hymnal 
was installed in St. Francis'. A total of 
108 persons attended the 8:00 A. M. 
and 11:00 A. M. Easter Eucharists, 
nearly twice as many as attended these 
services last year. Mr. B. H. Sumner, 
a communicant of St. Francis', was re- 
cently appointed to the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Thompson Orphanage for 
a three-year term. 



Lincolnton 

Both St. Luke's and Our Saviour, Lin- 
colnton, were represented at the Con- 
vocation Lenten Offering Presentation 
in spite of the fact that they are without 
a Rector. The Vestry has recently call- 
ed a clergyman from Virginia who de- 
clined the call formally extended him, 
and is now actively "on the trail" of 
another. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers o fthe Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



The Beginnings of the Church at Rutherfordton 



By The Rev. J. B. Sill 



There are two interesting and well- 
built Church structures, one at Ruther- 
fordton and the other at Marion, which 
take us back to the years before we 
became separated as a Missionary Dis- 
trict from the diocese of North Caro- 
lina. It is 64 years since the present 
St. John's Church, at Marion, was built, 
and 100 years since St. John's Church 
was built at Rutherfordton. They are 
frame buildings and are still in good con- 
dition. They are both on the town's 
main streets. After the Rutherfordton 
parish built its stone Church, a short 
distance from St. John's, naming the 
new Church St. Francis, the old Church 
continued to be used for parish pur- 
poses until recent years, when the prop- 
erty was sold to the Lutherans. 

In its early days Rutherfordton be- 
came the chief town in the western part 
of the state. Its county, Rutherford, 
included what are now Lincoln, Polk 
and Henderson counties. McDowell 
County, of which Marion is the county 
seat, was its northern neighbor. At the 
time St. John's, Rutherfordton, was built 
there were some 500 residents of the 
town, and two years later, 1850, it is 
reported that ''the bar was strong and 
numerous',, and it continued so for many 
years. 

It was during Bishop Ives' episcopate 
that the parish was organized in 1845-46, 
and five persons confirmed by him. Rev. 
Lewis Taylor was sent as pastor, under 
whom the Church was built. The two 
succeeding pastors were men who had 
been trained for the ministry under 
Bishop Ives at Valle Crucis, Rev. Jarvis 
Buxton and Rev. C. T. Bland. Mr. 
Buxton was ordained priest at Ruther- 
lordton in 1849, having taken charge 
of the parish as a deacon, and continued 
in charge until 1852. The Church was 
consecrated in 1851, eighteen communi- 
cants being reported at the time. The 
vestry in 1849 were J. H. Carson, J. W. 



Calloway, F. J. Wilson and B. H. Stan- 
mire. Other communicant members of 
those days bear the names of Duffy, 
McDowell, Miller, Carrier, Britton, 
Twitty, Mills, Coxe, Davis, Ford and 
Shipp. It is recorded in 1849 that the 
"colored people of the town assembled 
at the Church on Saturday nights for 
worship and familiar instruction", pos- 
sibly the beginnings of our later con- 
gregation of St. Gabreils. Mr. Bland 
was rector from 1855-57, the records 
showing that Church services were held 
only on certain Sundays in the year 
tho on forty-nine other days one year. 
We must think of the extensive field 
to which these early priests were called, 
for they were distinctly missionary in 
their training and outlook. 

It may be that the opening of the 
Hickory Nut Turnpike in 1847 led young 
Jarvis Buxton to explore the mountain 
pass and discover a village called Ashe- 
ville. It was a lcng journey from there 
to Rutherfordton, but what he found of 
Church interest I have written about 
in an article on early days of Trinity 
Church. He moved to Asheville on leav- 
ing Rutherfordton. There was a short 
interim before Mr. Bland came to St. 
John's, when the Rev. R. H. Mason 
officiated here and at Shelbyville. The 
latter was probably the present Shelby. 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



MEN SERVE BREAKFAST 

The young people of All Souls Parish 
participated in the suggested Corporate 
Communion for Youth on April 18. 
Approximately 45 people attended the 
early service and stayed to breakfast 
afterwards. The young people present 
included some students from St. Gene- 
vieve's School as well as Asheville 
School. 

The special feature of the breakfast 
was the fact that the men of the congre- 
gation served it under the distinguished 
chef-ship of one of the vestrymen, Mr. 
duBois Rees. 



Redemption and Conversion are words 
used by preachers and bond-holders. 
Fellow-travellers ? 



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at Belk's 



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Esso Oil Burners 

I-M Home Insulation 

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St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows 

St. Mary's Woman's Auxiliary cleared 
#84.86 on their bazaar, details of which 
are noted elsewhere in this issue of The 
Highland Churchman. The Mission 
Committee met April 20th and voted 
funds towards grading the church yard 
so as to eliminate water in the basement 
now preventing the installation of a 
furnace. Plans were made towards pos- 
sibly securing running water in th mis- 
sion house from the spring owned by 
Mrs. T. R. Ford, a member of the Mis- 
sion Committee. Miss Adelaide Whis- 
nant was elected delegate to the Dioces- 
an Convention, and Mr. Joseph Harri- 
son, alternate. Beginning St. Mark's 
Day the hour of services in St. Mary's 
is being changed from 3:00 P. M. to 
9:30 A. M. on the second and fourth 
Sundays of the month held by the Rev. 
Mr. Leavell; on other Sundays Mr. 
John Oxford will serve as Lay Reader 
and Superintendent of the Church 
School at the same hour, 9:30 A. M. 



Trinity Men's Club 

The Men's Clug of Trinity Church 
were hosts to the Churchmen of Church 
Street at their regular meeting on April 
21st. Due to the large number attend- 
ing, it was not possible to arrange for a 
dinner meeting. 

The program was conducted by Mr. 
George V. Denny, Director and Mod- 
erator of America's Town Meeting. For 
some years the Town Meeting has been 
a regular feature o nthe radio networks, 
affording opportunity for round table 
discussions of topics of national and in- 
ternational interest. Mr. Denny was 
reared in Trinity and his mother still 
teaches in the kindergarten of the Sun- 
day School. 



10 



Editor, Highland Churchman: 

May I offer some comments on the 
article about Bishops by the Rev. Gale 
Webbe in your April issue? 

He gives some interpretations which 
need, I believe, some modifications. His 
use of the terms Apostolic Succession 
and Authority are open to question. 

The Bishopric, as he describes it, 
simply did not exist in the primitive 
Church. The terms Episcopos and Pres- 
buteros — Bishop and Presbyter, are 
synonymous in the New Testament 
(See Acts 20:17 and v. 28) and their 
functions in the New Testament are not 
of the highly sacerdotal character de- 
scribed by Air. Webbe. 

The Episcopate as it appeared in the 
second century was a development, and 
much of the authority and powers as- 
cribed to it were also developments. In 
fact, a part of the later developments 
included the papacy and papal infallibili- 
ty, but I am sure that Mr. Webbe will 
not accept these developments. 

The historic continuity of the Church, 
with an ordained and settled ministry, 



Compliments 
oi 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 




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George F. Wiese, Supt. 

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11 



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offers considerably more proof than a 
tactual succession which carries with it 
some theories of the ministry not war- 
ranted by Holy Scripture. 

Frankly, I do not care to move in the 
direction to which Mr. Webbe points — 
an authoritarian Church with a revival 
of a medieval sacerdotalism, in a world 
which is trying to learn how to live IN 
THE FREEDOM WITH WHICH 
CHRIST HAS MADE US FREE. 
Faithfully yours, 
(The Rev.) Norvin C. Duncan 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL ANL 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for GirU owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



3MItgJ)lanti 
Cljttrdjtnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XIX 



JUNE, 1948 



NO. 2 




The Rev. M. George Henry 

Bishop-Elect 



(Eljurrtjman 

Box 55 Vail© Crucls, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March i, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, Elect, The Rev. M. George 
Henry. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



EDITORIAL 

It is with profound satisfaction and 
joy that we print the name of the Rev. 
M. George Henry on our mast head as 
the Bishop-Elect of this Diocese. Mr. 



Henry's acceptance of his election will 
insure us of vital, forward-looking lead- 
ership. We should all well know by 
this time that although we are a diocese, 
this is really a missionary area, and we 
are confident that the man who has been 
elected will do much to expand the mis- 
sionary effort of our Church. Mr. Hen- 
ry has demonstrated his "rural-minded- 
ness" by his work in the mission field 
connected with his former charge in 
Tarboro where he served a large agri- 
cultural group. And his work in Char- 
lotte where he built an urban parish 
from scratch augers well for the pos- 
sibility of building work in the untouch- 
ed towns or the challenging opportunity 
that exists in West Asheville where we 
have no Church. 

In his message which we print on the 
editorial page, Mr. Henry gives us a 
very important reminder about the 
division of labor. We must not give 
way to the temptation to "let George do 
it", but must unite all our efforts to up- 
hold his hand. We shall be prepared 
to say to Mr. Henry upon the day of 
his consecration, "here is a field white 
for the harvest, but the laborers are not 
few." 



To the Clergy and Laity 
of the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina: 

It is with a very definite sense of being called by the Holy Spirit that 
I accept the election to be Bishop of the Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina. God speaks through His Church as well as to individuals directly. 
St. Matthias was chosen by a council of the Church assembled, and he 
heeded the call. St. Paul had an experience on the road to Damascus, and 
he heeded the call. Both were chosen vessels for their Master's work. 

With a conviction that the convention of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina was guided by the Holy Spirit, and with an inner experience that 
has been mine in the past few weeks, I am humbly accepting the high honor 
with the huge responsibility that goes with it. 

God does not use one man for great tasks. He chooses many. The 
consecration of one man to the episcopacy does not make great the Church 
nor even one Diocese of the Church. The whole Church, bishops, priests, 
deacons and laity, are the Body of Christ, and every member of the same 
in his vocation and ministry is needed to further the reconciliation of man 
to God. Depending upon the power of God, we will go forward together 
with the assurance Christ will work in and through us in the establishment 
of His Kingdom. 

M. GEORGE HENRY 



Henry Elected Bishop 



The Reverend Matthew George Henry was elected Bishop of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina at the Diocesan Convention held on May 14th in Trinity 
Church, Asheville. His election took place on the ninth ballot. 

Mr. Henry is the rector of Christ Church, Charlotte, having held that position 
since the parish was founded in 1943. Following his ordination to the diaconate 
in 1935, he served as locum tenens at St. Philip's Church, Durham, and St. Paul's 
Church, Winston-Salem. In 1936 he was priest in charge of the church at Walnut 
Cove and later in that year went to Tarboro as rector of Calvary Church where 
he also had charge of the extensive missionary work carried on by that parish. He 
was called to Charlotte from Calvary Church. His entire ministry has been in 
the Diocese of North Carolina. 

He was born at Chapel Hill, October 25, 1910, the son of Dr. and Mrs. G. K. G. 
Henry. Prior to his death, Mr. Henry, the Bishop-Elect's father, was a professor 
of Latin at the University of North Carolina and later registrar. Mr. Henry was 
graduated rfom the University where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Upon 
graduation he obtained a teaching fellowship at the University and later entered 
Virginia Theological Seminary, graduating in 1935. 

His wife is the former Miss Catherine Sprinkle, to whom he was married in 
June, 1937. There are three children. 

After visiting the Diocese, Mr. Henry called a special meeting of the vestry of 
Christ Church on Monday, May 24th, and announced his decision to accept the 
election subject to the consents of a majority of the bishops and standing committees 
of the Church. 



Results of Recent Episcopal Election 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


c. 1. 


Stuart 


15 21 


14 22 


14 20 


14 20 


12 22 


4 9 


3 


1 


1 


Warnecke 


11 39 


12 39 


8 37 


10 38 


12 41 


11 41 


13 36 


12 37 


9 34 


Henry 


4 13 


3 10 


7 12 


6 12 


6 7 


15 20 


16 28 


16 32 


15 36 


Lowry * 






1 


1 












Stoney * 






1 


1 












Tuton f 


















2 


Dollf 


















2 


* Nominated 


after i 


second b; 


allot. 














f Nominated 


after i 


eighth ba 


Hot. 















Diocesan Convention Highlights 



The Convention opened with a cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion at 
10:30 a. m. on Thursday, May 13th. At 
11:15 the Convention was called to or- 
der and the Reverend James P. Burke, 
Secretary of the Diocese, was elected to 
act as Presiding Officer for the Con- 
vention of 1948. 



The Rev. Mr. Burke in a brief open- 
ing address, stated that all regular busi- 
ness would have to be transacted on the 
opening day in order to leave the second 
day completely clear for the election of 
a bishop. To insure the speedy com- 
pletion of business, most of the reports 
of committees and departments were 
presented by title. These reports will 
appear in full in the 1948 Journal. 



In accepting his unanimous election 
as Secretary of the Diocese, Mr. Burke 
stated that it had been his intention to 
refuse the election. He felt, however, 
that it would be more difficult for a 
new bishop to work with a Secretary 
who was not thoroughly familiar with 
the functions of the office. He made it 
clear that he would like to see a new 
Secretary next year. 



As the first day had been devided into 
two parliamentary days, nominations 
for diocesan positions and the presenta- 
tion of the 1949 Budget were part of the 
morning session's order of business. 



Lunrheon on the first day was served 
by the Auxiliary of Trinity Church with 
delegates and visitors being invited as 
guests of the parish. The ladies had 
planned to use the same ham for the 
next day's luncheon when they realized 
that the second day was Friday and so 
the menu was changed to include fish. 
There can be no doubt that there was 
much harmony during this Convention. 



As usual, the adoption of the Budget 
was an item of much interest. With 
some minor changes, notably increasing 
the Hichland Churchman appropria- 
tion, the Budget was adopted. There 
was some discussion of the matter of 
missionary stipends and the hope was 
expressed that there could be a minimum 
salary of $2800 for married clergy and 
$2600 for unmarried missionaries. It 
would seem that the cost of wives has 
not increased in proportion to the cost 
of similar luxuries. 



The Rev. Edgar Goold, formerly pre- 
sident of St. Augustine's College, Ra- 
leigh, and now rector of Grace Church, 
Waynesville, was welcomed to the Con- 
vention and granted a seat and voice. 
Mr. Goold had not been long enough in 
the Diocese to be granted a vote, ac- 
cording to canon. 



Present at Roll Call were several re- 
tired clergy of the Diocese: The Rev. 
Messrs. G. F. Rogers, George Hurlbut, 
James Sill, N. C. Duncan, Hugh Dobbin, 
C. P. Burnett, and Fathers Arthur Far- 
num and Frank Saylor. 



In presenting the Budget, Mr. E. L. 
Kemper expressed himself as being de- 
lighted to have had the opportunity to 
serve as chairman of the Department of 
Finance. He said that in so serving he 
had gained a greater insight into the 
work of the Church. The Diocese is in- 
debted to Mr. Kemper for his work of 
the past three years, a work to which he 
has brought much talent and a spirit of 
devotion to the Church. 



A new method of balloting for dioces- 
an officers was used for the first time 
at this Convention. All officers were 



printed on one large ballot with direc- 
tions of the number of officers to be 
voted upon. The use of this ballot, 
passed upon by vote of the Convention, 
proved much speedier than the old meth- 
od of voting for each office on individual 
ballots. 

The Standing Committee elected is 
now composed of the following: The 
Rev. Messrs. J. P. Burke, G. M. Jenkins, 
C. G. Leavell, J. W. Tuton and Messrs. 
A. B. Stoney, W. L. Balthis, F. P. Bacon 
and W. M. Redwood. 

New members of the Executive Coun- 
cil are the Rev. Messrs. Burke and 
Leavell and Messrs. Charles Waddell 
and Ben Sumner. Mr. Waddell is a 
member of All Souls, Biltmore, and Mr. 
Sumner is a communicant of St. Fran- 
cis' Church, Rutherfordton. 

The Rev. James McKeown and Mr. 
V. J .Brown were elected Trustees of 
Sewanee, The Rev. B. M. Lackey, Sr., 
and Mrs. A. B. Stoney are Trustees of 
St. Mary's Raleigh, and the Rev. W. C. 
Cravner and Mr. W. L. Balthis were 
elected Managers for Thompson Or- 
phanage. 

Lay and clerical delegates and alter- 
nates to the Provincial Synod are too 
numerous to mention. 



limited to ten minutes and seconding 
speeches to three. There was no limit 
set on the number of seconding speeches 
at the outset, although it later became 
necessary to prohibit seconding speeches 
for the first three candidates named. 
During this discussion, Fr. Farnum was 
heard to remark mildly to those around 
him, "When Matthias and Barsabas 
were voted upon, who made the nomi- 
nating speeches?" A motion by Mr. 
Kingsland YanWinkle to have the first 
ballot serve only as a test ballot, not 
counting towards election and not being 
recorded, was defeated. 

With nominations in order, the chair 
first recognized the Rev. Ralph K. Web- 
ster, rector of St. Francis' Church, Ruth- 
erfordton. Fr. Webster nominated the 
Very Rev. Albert R. Stuart, Dean of 
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans. 
Several seconding speeches followed. 
The Rev. Frederick J. Warnecke, rector 
of St. Mark's Church, Richmond, Va., 
was then nominated, and his nomination 
was strongly seconded in speeches by 
several clergymen and laymen. Follow- 
ing the nomination of the Rev. M. 
George Henry and seconding speeches 
in his favor, there seemed to be no fur- 
ther interest in placing names in nomi- 
nation. Nominations were not closed, 
so it was made possible for further 
nominations to take place after voting 
had started. 



THE SECOND DAY 

The day appointed for the election of 
a bishop opened with a celebration of 
the Holy Communion at 7:30, the Rev. 
John Tuton, celebrant. A layman 
prominent in matters fiduciary, later re- 
marked that he was delighted to see 
such a "large" number of the clergy 
present at a celebration preceding an 
important election. 

Following the call to order at 10 a. m. 
there was some discussion of the rules 
which would govern the nominating and 
balloting. Nominating speeches were 



It was decided that there would be 
less chance of confusion in the voting 
if lay delegates voted by a roll call of 
the parishes and missions. The clergy, 
of course, voted separately. 



Following the second ballot, the 
names of the Rev. Charles Lowry, rector 
of All Saints' Church, Chevy Chase, 
Md., and the Rev. William Stoney of 
Anniston, Ala., were put in nomination. 



After lunch (fish) the Rev. B. M. 
Lackey, Sr., added a much needed light 



touch. In answering questions concern- 
ing Mr. Henry's possible acceptance, he 
said, "If you want to elect someone you 
are sure will accept, elect me." 



It was apparent on the fifth ballot 
that a deadlock had developed between 
Mr. Warnecke and Mr. Stuart. Mr. 
Warnecke had consistently won a ma- 
jority of the lay vote, but lack of a 
majority in the clerical house prevented 
his election. The Veni Creator (plain- 
song version) was chirped and "The 
Church's One Foundation" was thun- 
dered before the sixth ballot. It was 
on this ballot that Mr. Henry picked up 
the clerical strength that continued un- 
til his election. 



Before the ninth ballot was cast, the 
Rev. John Tuton was nominated as was 
the Rev. Harry L. Doll of Baltimore. 

"And the lot fell upon Matthias." 

Someone did some very wise parlia- 
mentary thinking in moving that the 
Convention be recessed for thirty days 
rather than adjourned. In the event 
the bishop-elect had not accepted, it 
would have been necessary only for the 
Chairman to call the Convention back 
to order. If the Convention had ad- 
journed, and Mr. Henry had not ac- 
cepted, it would have then been neces- 
sary to wait sixty days after a special 
convention was called. As matters now 
stand, the Convention is automatically 
adjourned upon the lack of a call to 
order. 

With baseball very much in the air 
around Asheville, it was not inappro- 
priate when Mr. Burke remarked that 
the game had gone a full nine innings. 



Bishop-Elect Visits Diocese 

The Rev. M. George Henry paid a 
brief visit to the Diocese on May 20th, 
meeting with priests and laymen at a 
meeting held at the Biltmore Country 
Club. Mr. V. Jordan Brown was in 
charge of arrangements which included 
a luncheon at the Country Club. Al- 
most every clergyman now resident 
within the Diocese was present as were 
some laymen and laywomen of the 
Diocese. 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins presided at 
the meeting and introduced Mr. Henry. 
At the time, Mr. Henry had not yet 
made his decision to accept his election, 
but he spoke highly of the things he had 
seen and heard on his brief tour. He 
had been able to visit Lenoir, Morgan- 
ton, Marion, Black Mountain and Ashe- 
ville on his way from Charlotte. He 
closed his brief address by asking the 
prayers of the Diocese in helping him to 
make the weighty decision that had been 
placed upon him. 

Time did not allow everyone to make 
an address of welcome and encourage- 
ment to the Bishop-Elect, but some of 
the clergy were heard from. J. P. Burke, 
I. N. Northup, A. R. Morgan, W. C. 
Leach and G. D. Webbe made brief 
remarks. 



Diocese of North Carolina To 
Elect Bishop Coadjutor 

At the Annual Convention of the 
Diocese of North Carolina, held May 
11th and 12th, it was decided that a 
Bishop-Coadjutor would be elected. 
This election will not take place until 
the next Convention of the Diocese to 
be held in May, 1949. The matter of 
securing episcopal assistance for Bishop 
Penick had been under consideration for 
some time and it was as an outgrowth 
of this consideration that the suggestion 
was made unofficially that the state be 
divided into two dioceses instead of the 
present three. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



The Woman's Auxiliary of the Church 
of the Holy Cross, Tryon, meeting in 
the home of the president, Mrs. W. A. 
Dobbin, on Monday, May 17th, enjoyed 
a very interesting and worthwhile meet- 
ing. There were thirty people present, 
with three guests from the Saluda 
branch. After a most interesting talk 
about her work the County Visiting 
Nurse, Miss Garcia, was given a shower 
of articles useful in her work with in- 
digent patients. She received two large 
cartons of soap, talcum powder, rubbing 
alcohol, sheets, pillow cases, towels, 
nightwear, and anything else the mem- 
bers could think of use to bed-ridden 
people. 

It was also voted to keep a basket in 
a central place downtown at all times, 
so that members might leave fruit, jellies, 
cookies and the like with which to vary 
the diets of the sick in Polk County un- 
able to get them personally. 

St. Agnes' Guild has for sometime 
been giving Miss Garcia five dollars a 
month to spend at her discretion for the 
needs of these people. 



The above news item on social ser- 
vice brings to mind that the two new 
publications from the Department of 
Christian Social Service are most help- 
ful. They are "Our Parish Serves Its 
Community" and "Christian Social Re- 
lations In The Parish", and may be 
obtained from the National Council. 



While typing this last article, the re- 
tiring Promotion Chairman is acutely 
aware of her failure in helping to meet 
one real challenge to the Auxiliary. This 
is the challenge of organizing Auxiliary 
branches in the parish and churches that 
have gone for years without one. 

Why do these congregations not have 
Auxiliary groups? Is it due to lack of 
knowledge of what the Auxiliary can 
accomplish? Is it that they have tried 
it and failed? Is it due to the indiffer- 



ence of the clergy? Or is it that the 
Diocesan Auxiliary has failed in provid- 
ing sufficient impetus and leadership? 
To say that many of the groups are too 
small is not the answer— there are 
groups of six women, or nine, doing 
stupendous jobs through their Auxiliary. 
Whatever the cause, it seems that this 
is one challenge the Auxiliary must at- 
tempt to meet. Whether it be through 
the clergy, through the women, or 
through sponsoring Auxiliaries of near- 
by churches, there should be an Auxil- 
iary branch in every parish and mission 
in the Diocese. 



A final plea to the Diocesan officers 
and the branch presidents: Please keep 
the news before the Diocese by sending 
in items to your new Promotion Chair- 
man. 



YOUNG CHURCHMEN'S NEWS 

At the time of this writing, the Young 
Churchmen's Camp of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina is in its third 
day of fun and fellowship. This is the 
fifth annual camp of the Diocesan 
Youth, and there are many familiar 
campers in the group. There are very 
few unfamiliar ones now, because it 
doesn't take anyone long to get ac- 
quainted here at Patterson Camp, lo- 
cated in the beautiful region known as 
Happy Valley. 

There has been considerable rain dur- 
ing these past few days, but that has 
not kept us from getting off to a bang-up 
start. The classes are well attended 
(not just because it is compulsory) and 
the programs have been well accepted. 
The program tonight will be the tradi- 
tional "Frankie and Johnnie" being pre- 
sented by the counsellors and faculty 
members. 

We have the largest group of campers 
ever to attend Patterson this year, and 
the dining room and dormitories are 
filled to overflowing. 



Received By The Diocese of Western North 

Carolina From Parishes and Missions 

January 1st to March 31st, 1948 

Made Paid PARISHES Made Paid 

$ 891.53 $ 150.00 Asheville, Trinity $ 2,507.44 $ 784.03 

207.39 Asheville, St. Mary's 430.71 

99.66 Asheville, St. Matthias' 291.86 

794.15 265.82 Biltmore, All Souls' 2,233.55 470.20 

135.58 Brevard, St. Philip's 384.33 79.84 

70.76 Flat Rock, St. John's 219.74 

261.66 65.43 Fletcher, Calvary 650.00 198.31 

281.67 70.41 Gastonia, St. Mark's 792.20 198.00 

243.27 Hendersonville, St. lames' 684.25 92.92 

226.57 Hickory, Ascension 63 7.22 

175.43 23.34 Lenoir, St. James' 495.39 59.45 

167.64 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 471.50 45.67 

136.07 Marion, St. Tohn's 382.70 

398.18 Morganton, Grace 1,119.88 208.55 

233.95 Rutherfordton, St. Francis' 657.98 

451.29 35.22 Tryon, Holy Cross 1,269.25 211.54 

101.07 101.07 Waynesville, Grace 284.27 

63.80 31.90 Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 179.42 89.72 



$4,959.69 $ 789.09 TOTAL $13,671.69 $ 2,438.23 

MISSIONS 

$ 35.00 $ 35.00 Arden, Christ School $ 85.00 

35.73 Asheville, The Redeemer 100.50 

16.72 Asheville, St. Luke's 47.03 

17.49 Asheville, Trinity Chapel 49.18 

10.00 Bat Cave, Transfiguration 80.10 

10.00 Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 21.55 

10.00 10.00 Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 27.30 27.30 

87.27 Black Mountain. St. James 245.43 

30.00 Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. 56.84 

24.91 24.91 Boon, St. Luke's ... 70.06 70.06 

60.54 Canton, St. Andrew's 190.29 

6.00 Cullowhee. St. David's 8.50 

13.11 Ednevville, St. Paul's 36.87 42.92 

61.55 Franklin. St. Agnes 193.10 

10.00 2.00 Franklin. St. Cyprian's 16.25 4.50 

10.00 Glen Alpine, St." Paul's 12.00 

10.00 ___•___ Glendale Springs, Holv Trinity 17.30 

10.00 High Shoals. St. Tohn's 21.11 

52.36 52.36 Highlands, Incarnation 147.26 73.64 

10.00 Hot Springs. St. John's 10.00 

25.00 Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 81.95 

10.00 Lincolnton. St. Cyprian's 18.33 

10.00 Lincoln. Woodside, Our Saviour 37.15 

20.00 Little Switzerland. Resurrection 30.50 

12.00 Morganton, St.t Mary's 60.12 

10.00 Morganton. St. Stephen's 13.82 

18.00 18.00 Murphv, Messiah 52.58 52.58 

30.50 Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 85.99 

10.00 10.00 Saluda, Transfiguration 55.00 55.00 

67.30 67.30 Shelbv, The Redeemer 189.30 

10.00 Sylva, St. John's 15.74 

10.00 Todd, St. Matthew's 8.05 

• 43.00 10.75 Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 133.96 193.31 

12.00 Asheville. Grace 17.70 

Blackstone. Mission 5.00 

10.00 Cashiers, Good Shepherd 10.00 

10.00 Cherokee. St. Francis of Assisi 13.00 

Edneyville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Lincolnton. St. Stephen's 

12.00 Linville, All Saints 24.40 

Morganton. St. Elizabeth's 

12.00 Penland, Good Shepherd 30.5 5 12.25 

6.00 Rutherfordton. Missions 8.00 

10.00 10.00 Trvon. Good Shepherd 11.00 

12.00 Upward, St. John Baptist 61.00 

Valle Crucis, St. John Baptist 



$ 895.69 $ 240.32 TOTAL $ 2,358.57 $ 531.56 



$5,855.38 $1,029.41 TOTAL $16,030.26 $ 2,969.79 



Two Good Offerings . . . 

It has been announced that the Pre- 
siding Bishop's Fund for World Relief 
has reached the total of $4,803.40 in the 
Diocese. This figure represents an of- 
fering well over the Diocesan quota 
which was in the neighborhood of three 
thousand dollars. Although it does not 
reach the figure of over five thousand 
dollars raised last year, it may well be 
that before the year is out 1947's total 
may be exceeded. It will be remem- 
bered that most of this year's offering 
was raised in one day. 

The Lenten Mite Box Offering from 
the Diocese for 1948 is over $1,350.00. 
With this very creditable showing, West- 
ern North Carolina has contributed over 
$6,150.00 for work of the Church out- 
side of the Diocese. 

And a Bad Quarterly Report 

Printed elsewhere in The Highland 
Churchman is a quarterly report from 
Mr. Redwood giving the amounts re- 
ceived from each parish and mission on 
assessment and quota. It is not a report 
which is a pleasure to print. 

Out of 34 organized missions, only 9 
are listed as paying anything on their 
assessment and only 8 of the 34 paid 
anything at all on their quotas. And 
lest the parishes get too high an opinion 
of themselves, their proportionate re- 
cord is little better. 

The Highland Churchman had in- 
tended to make a separate list of those 
which were in arrears. It isn't necessary 
with the gaps so glaringly apparent, and 
besides, there wouldn't be enough space. 



Boundary Committee 
Authorized 

The Diocesan Convention unanimous- 
ly passed a motion by Dr. P. N. Devere 
of Morganton to authorize a committee 
to study the matter of realignment of 
the diocesan lines in North Carolina. 
This action is similar to those taken by 
the Dioceses of North Carolina and East 
Carolina at their conventions which 



were held just previous to that of West- 
ern North Carolina's. This committee 
is to meet with the committees of the 
two other Dioceses at the call of the 
Secretary of the Diocese of North Caro- 
lina. The first meeting is to take place 
within four months of the formation of 
the committees. 

The joint sessions of these commit- 
tees will make a thorough study of all 
matters and problems pertaining to 
changing diocesan boundaries and a full 
report of their deliberations shall be 
made to the conventions next year. 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



What Is Expected of Us 



1949 1949 
Assess- Apportion- 
ment for tnent for 
Support Missions 
of and Gen- 
Diocese PARISHES eral Church 

$1,315.00 Asheville, Trinity $ 2,510.00 

322.00 Asheville, St. Mary's 615.00 

109.00 Asheville, St. Matthias 208.00 

1,170.00 Biltmore, All Souls 2,232.00 

219.00 Brevard, St. Philips 417.00 

130.00 Flat Rock, St. John 250.00 

398.00 Fletcher, Calvary 759.00 

410.00 Gastonia St. Marks 775.00 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



STUDIOS OF 
^ORGG LPAYDS 

245l}ROSDWAY~PATGRSOn n..T. 
K FOUIlDeOilS.95 a 

CHURCH ffiGfllORIALS 

STA1DGD GLASS -WOOD T m£TAL 

ALL CHURCH CRAFTS 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg.. Asheville, N. C. 



370.00 
334.00 
253.00 
216.00 
234.00 
580.00 
358.00 
729.00 
170.00 
103.00 

$7,420.00 



$ 68.00 
89.00 
36.00 
31.00 
30.00 
10.00 
39.00 

117.00 
30.00 
48.00 

114.00 
10.00 

10.00 
19.00 
96.00 
10.00 
10.00 
13.00 

10.00 
80.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
26.00 

20.00 

10.00 
12.00 
23.00 
41.00 
10.00 
95.00 
22.00 
10.00 
67.00 

$1,246.00 



24.00 

8.00 

22.00 

54.00 



Hendersonville, St. James 707.00 

Hickory, Ascension 637.00 

Lenoir, St. James 482.00 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 412.00 

Marion, St. John's 445.00 

Morganton, Grace 1,196.00 

Rutherfordton. St. Francis 684.00 

Tryon, Holy Cross 1,391.00 

Waynesville, Grace 323.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul 196.00 



$8,720.00 



$14,239.00 

ORGANIZED MISIONS 

Arden, Christ School $ 170.00 

Asheville, Redeemer 110.00 

Asheville, St. Luke's 68.00 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel ___ 60.00 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 57.00 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's __ 12.00 

Bessemer City, St. Andrews 47.00 

Black Mountain, St. James 224.00 

Blowing Rock, St. Mary's— 37.00 

Boone, St. Luke's 99.00 

Canton, St. Andrews 218.00 

Cherokee, St. Francis 

of Assisi 12.00 

Cullowhee, St. David 12.00 

Edneyville, St. Paul 36.00 

Franklin, St. Agnes 183.00 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 12.00 

Glen Alpine.St. Paul 12.00 

Glendale Springs, 

Holy Trinity 17.00 

High Shoals. St. John's ___ 12.00 

Highlands, Incarnation 154.00 

Hot Springs, St. John 12.00 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 80.00 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's __ 12.00 
Lincoln, Woodside, 

Our Savior 49.00 

Little Switzerland, 

Resurrection 30.00 

Morganton, St. Stephen's.- 12.00 

Morganton, St. Mary's ___ 60.00 

Murphy, Messiah 44.00 

Rutherfordton. St. Gabriel's 79.00 

Saluda, Transfiguration 35.00 

Shelby. Redeemer 182.00 

Sylva, St. John's 42.00 

Todd. St. Matthew 12.00 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross _- 134.00 

$ 2,335.00 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Asheville, Grace $ 46.00 

Linville, All Saints 12.00 

Penland. Good Shepherd 42.00 

$ 100.00 

$16,674.00 



10 



WOMEN OUTNUMBER MEN IN 
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 

Research workers here report that 
there are seven women for every three 
men to be found in the membership of 
the non-Roman Churches in the city. 
They find, too, that only one out of 
twelve laborers, who make up 26^, of 
all persons gainfully employed, are 
found in the non-Roman Churches. 
Meanwhile, in spite of population in- 
creases, Sunday school enrollment in the 
last fifteen years has dropped 15% . Of 
those who are members of non-Roman 
Churches, only one out of three attends 
Sunday morning services regularly. The 
Episcopal Church's Committee on Lay- 
men's Work reports these facts with the 
comment that they present "a challenge 
to our Church, as well as to other 
Churches, to face our evangelistic task." 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



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fpm HIGHEST • SKILLED • CRAFTSMANSHIP f^¥ r \ 
!*♦*! * K K ORIGINAL' DESIGNS* X X !>♦■»! 



The XcrtUrsQft School 




Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of '.Vestern North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. 7iese, Supt . 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Ashcvill£ # »+ 0* 



At least three bishops must be present 
and taking part to consecrate a new 
bishop. 




It is not expected that the Bishop- 
Elect will be consecrated until early 
Autumn. 



The Rev. Mr. Henry will be one of 
the youngest bishops to be consecrated 
in recent years. He is only seven years 
older than Bishop William J. Gordon, 
recently consecrated Missionary Bishop 
of Alaska. 



of the Diocese of Western ;\orth Caro- 
lina, and will be the third bishop of 
this Diocese to be elected from the 
Diocese of North Carolina. 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



Mr. Henry will be the third bishop 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for GirU owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. AM academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 










BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



TEMtgJjlattb 
CJ)tttc|)tnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XIX 



JULY, 1948 



NO. 3 




New High Altar for St. Paul's, London 



SSrff i$igh;lattb 
GUiurrtftnan 

Box 55 Valle Cnicls. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy. 50c a year. 

The Bishop, Elect, The Rev. M. George 
Henry. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Diocesan Boundaries 

(Excerpt frcm Address to the Diocesan 
Convention, May, 1948) 

(From North Carolina Churchman) 

During the past year I have occasion- 
ally had reason to think that some dis- 
cussion was going on concerning the 
boundary lines on our eastern and west- 
ern borders. So far as my knowledge 
extended, this discussion was limited to 
a few localities and to a small number 
of individuals. It may have been more 
general than I was aware. The three 
or four communications on the subject 
that I received were of a personal na- 
ture, entirely informal, and reflected 
only the opinion of individuals. They 
afforded excellent examples of our be- 
lief in the untrammeled freedom of 
speech and press. I have made no of- 
ficial utterance on this subject out of 
deference to this bodv, for any action 
T K at might contemplate even the slight- 
est shift in our diocesan territory is of 
so serious a nature that it should origin- 
ate, not with me, but with this Conven- 



tion. The last time the question of 
realigning our diocesan boundaries re- 
ceived the official attention of this body 
was in 1935, when the Convention 
adopted the report of its Special Com- 
mittee to the effect that the boundaries 
of this diocese should remain unchanged. 

I see no reason why this subject 
should be reopened. In saying this, I 
do not mean to influence the judgment 
of this Convention if you should recide 
that it is desirable to revive the discus- 
sion. If, in the opinion of this body, 
there are good and sufficient reasons 
why this issue should be re-examined, 
I would, of course, acquiesce in your 
wishes. In such case, however, I would 
want it to be understood that this ac- 
quiescence has reference only to any new 
study of the subject that may be under- 
taken by a Special Committee, and does 
not apply to any findings or recommen- 
dations that such a committee may offer 
a year from now. My consent to the 
reconsideration of this subject now must 
not be construed as my canonical ap- 
proval, at any future time, of any re- 
adjustment of diocesan territory that 
may be proposed. The clearly delineat- 
ed responsibility of the Bishop in such 
matters has prompted me to speak 
frankly. 

Edwin A. Penick, 
Bishop of North Carolina. 



OUR COVER 

NEW HIGH ALTAR FOR ST. 
PAUL'S. LONDO N— Detailed 
drawing of new high altar which 
is to be erected in St. Paul's Cath- 
edral. Altar materials will be oak 
and ornaments will be of gold. 
Officials believe new altar will ful- 
fill intentions of Sir Christopher 
Wren, who designed St. Paul's. 
The cathedral, opened in 1697, is 
considered the finest example of 
Renaissance architecture in Eng- 
land. 

— Religious Nezvs Service Photo. 



Church Institute Meets At Valle Crucis 



The Southern Rural Church Insti- 
tute, a unit of the Student Rural Field 
Service of National Council, and held in 
cooperation with the Board of Manag- 
ers of the Valle Crucis School, and the 
Priest-in-charge of Holy Cross Church, 
Valle Crucis, opened the evening of 
June fifteenth for the -third annual ses- 
sion. The Rev. E. Dargan Butt, for- 
merly of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina and of Valle Crucis, and now 
on the faculty of Seabury-Western 
Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illi- 
nois, is acting as Director of the Insti- 
tute. 

The Student Rural Field Service is 
carried on for the purpose of giving 
clinical work in the town-country church 
field to the theological students, women 
in training for Church work, and others 
interested in gaining more knowledge 
and inspiration in this work. There are 
in residence this year at Valle Crucis 
sixteen students representing the follow- 
ing seminaries and training schools: 
Sewanee, Virginia, Seabury-Western, 
Philadelphia, and St. Faith's. 

The faculty consists of men and 
women who are trained leaders and 
teachers of town-country church work. 
Beside the Director, who is giving a 
course on Rural Sociology; the follow- 
ing will teach at the Institute: Miss 
Charlotte Tomkins, of National Council, 
"Christian Education;" The Res. Messrs 
A. R. Morgan and Jas. McKeown, "The 
Rural Church;" The Rev. J. W'arren 
Albinson, '"The Cooperative Rural Par- 
ish;" Miss Ethel Ried, Durham, N. C, 
''The Vacation Church School;" Mr. 
Frank Smith, Berea College, "Rural 
Community Recreation;" the Rev. 
l?nv:s McClain, "Visual Aids;" the Rev. 
Dumont Clarke, "The Lord's Acre;" 
and other lectures by various leaders, 
on "Soil Conservation;" "Laymen and 
Rural Church Work;" "The Work of 
the Rural County Agencies", and like 
subjects. 



On the completion of the three week 
course of training, the students will be 
sent into the field to work under selected 
Priests, actively participating in the 
various phases of rural church work. 
While at Valle Crucis all students will 
spend part of the time working on the 
farm under the oversight of the farm 
manager, Mr. Mont Glovier. 

The Student Rural Field Service is 
carried on in cooperation with the va- 
rious seminaries and women's training 
schools, and students receive credit in 
the schools for successful work done 
during the summer in the Institutes. 

Visitors who are interested in this 
work are cordially invited to stop by 
Valle Crucis to see the work of the In- 
stitute. 



Parish Has Publicity 
Chairman 

Grace Church, W'aynesville, has an 
interesting feature in its organizational 
life which might well be imitated by 
other parishes. There is a Rector's 
Guild and among the officers is a chair- 
man in charge of publicity. The chair- 
man this year is Miss Evelyn Reed. If 
every parish and organized mission had 
someone who was in charge of publicity, 
news would not be lacking for the dio- 
cesan paper and there would be a better 
possibility for the Episcopal Church to 
get in the news through the secular 
press. 

The parish is busily engaged in mak- 
ing many necessary repairs to the Rec- 
tory, providing new hymnals and new 
carpet for the church. In a small but 
growing congregation, the Guild is spon- 
soring suppers to raise funds for these 
purposes. The first of these suppers 
was served under the supervision of 
Mrs. M. C. Green, assisted by Mrs. J. 
L. Taliaferro, Mrs. John Taylor and 
Mrs. M. Marshall. 



3 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN 
EDUCATION 

Rev. W. C. Leach Chairman 

Rev. J. P. Burke Rev. R. B. Campbell 
Mr. John Oxford Mrs. Sheldon Leavitt 



A POWERFUL AGENCY 

There are three powerful agencies of 
Christian Education in the Church to- 
day. The first is the Church school. 
The second is the truly Christian family. 
The third is the summer conference. 

Unlike the first two, the conference 
experience is brief, but it comes with an 
intensity unequaled by any other agency 
of learning. For that reason the im- 
pressions it makes are very vivid and 
last a long time. 

The summer conference never should 
and never will be a substitute for train- 
ing in a good Sunday school, or the 
privilege of being brought up in a good 
Christian home. But if it is added to 
these experiences nothing can equal it 
in deepening and intensifying the pre- 
vious Christian training received. 

What are the advantages of attend- 
ance at a good summer conference? I 
believe they are these: 

First, there is the experience of fel- 
lowship with other believers in an ex- 
perience which is dedicated to worship, 
study, service and enjoyment. Being a 
part of a group for a few weeks, which 
is living the Christian life intensely is 
by itself a strong builder of Christian 
loyalty. 

Second, at a summer conference, the 
caliber of instructor is superior. More 
resources are available in instructors 
and instruction than can be mustered 
by the average local priest. No matter 
how well one has been trained before, 
he is bound to learn more at a summer 
conference. 



Third, the opportunity to deepen an 
awareness of God through corporate 
worship is greatly enhanced at a summer 
conference. Often the most cherished 
and remembered part of the conference 
is the chapel service. Why? Because 
a fresh glimpse of the reality of God and 
His Divine Grace is gained there. 

There are many summer conferences 
held in all provinces of the Church. 
Church people, young and old, will bene- 
fit in knowledge, in spirit and in bodily 
health by attending one of them this 
summer. 

— John Heuss, Churchways. 



THAT SUPREME COURT DECISION 

A Statement by the Rev. lohn Heuss, 

D.D., Director of the Department of 

Christian Education of the 

National Council. 

The adverse decision of the United 
States Supreme Court in the matter of 
the weekday religious education in the 
public schools was a great shock to all 
Churchmen and a sad blow to this in- 
creasingly popular practice. Coming at 
a time in history when it is all too ap- 
parent that society needs most desper- 
ately to fortify itself with all the forces 
of righteousness, it is regretable that 
anyhing should indicate a shift in gov- 
ernment policy from an attitude of en- 
couragement and friendliness to public 
instruction in religion to one of neu- 
trality. 

The decision itself will drastically af- 
fect further use of public school build- 
ings for religious classes. It does not 
yet affect the holding of classes on re- 
leased time in church buildings. There- 
fore, it is urged upon the leadership of 
all Episcopal churches where the auth- 
orities move to discontinuance of classes 
in the public school building, that im- 
mediate provision be made to house 



these classes in their own buildings. 
There is some ambiguity at the moment 
as to the court's intention to rule out all 
released time. However, four of the 
justices indicated that they did not in- 
tend to do so, and a fifth dissented from 
the opinion because he feared this result. 
On these grounds, we interpre tthe law 
at this moment as having no effect upon 
released time when instruction is given 
in the church building. 

This Department recognized and ap- 
proves the propriety of respecting this 
decision and urges conformity to it in 
both spirit and letter, but it does not 
urge a hasty change of any local situa- 
tion initiated by the church. Let that 
come from the school authorities. The 
situation is not at this moment clear 
enough. Clarification will come with 
time. 

One thing is obvious. More than ever, 
the responsibility for religious instruc- 
tion rests upon us in the Church. Let 
each parish give even greater thought to 
the discharge of the greatest task. 



VISUAL MATERIALS HAVE 
BIBLE THEMES 

The Ten Commandments 

Ten 35mm black and white filmstrips 
containing approximately 250 single 
frame drawings. Text is on the film, so 
no manual is needed. Sold only in com- 
plete sets for $20.00 a set. Produced 
and distributed by CHURCH CRAFT 
PICTURES, Inc., 3312 Lindell Blvd., 
St. Louis, 3, Mo. Although made es- 
pecially for the confirmation class ages 
(11-14), they can be used with all ages. 

These filmstrips are prepared for 
Church-Craft Pictures by the Commit- 
tee on Visualizing Luther's Catechism of 
the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran 
Church. Teachers and leaders in the 
Episcopal Church, who are willing to do 
a great deal of adapting of material and 
approach, might be able to use them. 
Watch the column New Tools for Learn- 



ing in the Southern Churchman for a 
more detailed view. 

When The Littlest Camel Knelt 

A Kodachrome Filmstrip of 40 frames, 
35mm in full color with manual. $10.00. 
Produced and distributed by Cathedral 
Films, 1970 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 
28, Calif. Order direct or write Visual 
Service, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York 
10, N. Y. 

To quote from Cathedral Films re- 
lease sheets — "The most beloved story 
in the world told in a new way. Child- 
ren and adults alike will enjoy this re- 
freshing story." 

Providence Bible Slides 

Eleven sets of 2 x 2 Kodachrome 
Slides made from the paintings in the 
gallery of the Providence Lithographic 
Company. They include Old Testiment 
Stores, Parts 1 to 5 inclusive, Biblical 
Customs, in 2 parts; Builders of the 
Early Church; Moses, Joseph and St. 
Paul. 

There are 90 slides in the complete 
set costing -$45.00. Individual sets may 
be purchased. 



First Two Pamphlets On 
Layman's Work Ready 

The first two pamphlets in the series 
of four on "Laymen's Work in the Epis- 
copal Church," are now available. Re- 
action from lay leaders who have re- 
ceived advance copies of these pamphlets 
emphasizes the fact that they will meet 
a real need of clergy and laymen. 

The articles in the pamphlets have 
been prepared by laymen and clergy 
who have had particular success in the 
field about which they write. The ar- 
ticles are concise and suggestive. 

The two pamphlets now available 
are "Organization" and "Evangelism 
through Worship and Education." Price 
10c each. 



Parish Has Service Of 
Dedication For Teachers 

A very significant service has been 
held each September for more than 
twenty years in St. Mark's Church, San 
Antonio. This brings together all the 
teachers of the congregation, both from 
the public and the private schools of the 
city, for a service of Holy Communion 
with special prayers for them as they 
begin their work. The service is fol- 
lowed by breakfast, served by one of 
the guilds, with all the teachers as 
guests. This year the Superintendent 
of the City Schools and the Rector made 
addresses at the breakfast. 

"Since there can be no religious teach- 
ing as such in the schools," writes Mrs. 
J. H. Moore, "the stressing of religion 
on the part of those who have the re- 
sponsibility of training the young can- 
not be overemphasized." 



Patterson School Issues 
Pamphlet 

The Patterson School for Boys at 
Legerwood has recently issued a very 
colorful and interesting brochure setting 
forth the development of the school to- 
gether with a prospectus for future ex- 
pansion. The pamphlet is profusely 
illustrated with photographs of the ac- 
tivities of the boys at the school and also 
contains architectural drawings of the 
projected buildings. 

One feature of the booklet which 
should be of great interest to the Diocese 
and particularly to its young people, is 
a panorama drawing which prominently 
features the future Camp Patterson. 
For some time past the School has been 
host to many camp groups among which 
is the annual camp for the youth of the 
Diocese. Camp Patterson will have 
cabins for campers and leaders, dining 
hall, recreational facilities and a large 
lake for swimming and boating. 

Patterson School is a diocesan school, 



but for many years past has received 
only nominal financial support from the 
Diocese. The past ten years of expan- 
sion and increasing effectiveness has 
been made possible by the interest and 
support of individuals. Diocesan and 
parish groups which are interested in 
learning more about Patterson School 
can do so by writing to Mr. George 
Wiese. Arrangements can be made for 
a showing of the color film, "Happy 
Valley", a good presentation of the life 
and work of the School. 



Bishop Gribbin Visits 
St. Francis', Rutherfordton 

The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, 
D. D., visited St. Francis', Rutherford- 
ton, at 8:00 P. M. Sunday night, June 
20th. The Rev. Ralph K. Webster, 
Rector of St. Francis', presented a class 
of eight persons, one of whom was a 
candidate from Grace Church, Morgan- 
ton. Taking as his charge to the class 
"Daily increase". Bishop Gribbin stress- 
ed growth in the Christian life both in 
his talk to the class and in his sermon to 
the congregation of some sixty or more 
persons. 

St. Francis' has an excellent solution 
for church services and Church School 
for the summer months. Beginning July 
4th there is to be only one service each 
Sunday, the Holy Eucharist at 9:30 
A. M. The regular Church School year 
will close June 27th, with a special com- 
mencement service at 11 :00 A. M. For 
the remainder of the summer brief in- 
structions on the New Testament will 
be given at the 9:30 Eucharist, and 
Church School children have been re- 
quested to attend with their parents. 
Summer Church School attendance will 
be recorded every Sunday, and special 
awards will be made at the end of the 
summer. The nursery class will meet in 
the Cloister House at 9:30 during the 
regular service hour beginning July 4th. 



YOUTH NEWS 



The fifth year of our Diocesan Camp 
for Young Churchmen at Patterson 
School has been proclaimed by many as 
having been the best yet. Of this we 
cannot be sure; every year has been 
good. Yet we do feel that we had a 
very successful camp both from the 
standpoint of enjoyment and of spiritual 
advancement. Appreciation to Patter- 
son School for affording the facilities, 
and to Mr. Wiese and the others on the 
staff of the school for their cooperation 
is definitely in order. The Camp staff 
of faculty and counsellors was excellent. 
It consisted of the Rev. C. G. Leavell, 
Director; the Rev. Robert B. Campbell, 
Vice-Director; the Rev. G. M. Jenkins, 
the Rev. Howard Rhys, Miss Alene 
Cronshey, Mrs. Robert B. Campbell, 
Miss Patricia Page, and Miss Helen 
Thomas. Due to sickness at home the 
Rev W. C. Leach and the Rev. R. K. 
Webster, Chaplain, were unavoidably 
late in arriving, but their coming gave 
a boost just at the time it was needed. 
Other clergy filled in nobly for the Chap- 
lain until his arrival on Thursday. 

Sixteen parishes and missions sent 
young people to swell the total to 54. 
For the first time attendance honors left 
Grace Church, Morganton, and went 
out of the Morganton Convocation to 
Trinity, Asheville, which had a splendid 
delegation of seven young people. Valle 
Crucis and Bessemer City were runners- 
up with five each. We feel it may be of 
interest to list the delegations of each 
congregation, in the order, of their at- 
tendance: 

Trinity, Asheville: Bill Arden, Rose 
Marie Brown, Laura Chapman, Nancy 
Hipps, Betty Kirby, Frances Margaret 
Reid, Nancy Mae Waller. 

Holy Cross, Valle Crucis: Virginia 
Cook, Sarah Frances Davis, Betty 
Tester, Joan Evelyn W 7 elch, Margaret 
Virginia W T elch, Linda Townsend, 



St. Andrew's, Bessemer City: Alene 
Cole, Thelma Cole, Gary Hook, Mar- 
lene Hovie, Frances Huss. 

St. Paul's, Wilkesboro: Joe Barber, 
Anne Carlton, Pete Reins, Tommy 
Reins. 

St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows (Mor- 
ganton): Clarence Vernon Harrison, 
William Nelvin Harrison, Harold Clay 
Whisnant, Paul R. Whisnant. 

Grace, Morganton: Elizabeth Lynn 
Cline, Charles Douglas Leavell, Mary 
Aston Leavell, Bennie Smith. 

Ascension, Hickory: Mary Anne 
Brown, David Hill, Nancy Poovey, Bet- 
ty Lee Short. 

St. Paul's, Edneyville: Christine 
Jones, Jonnie Ruth Moore, Betty Ann 
Rhodes. 

Chapel of Rest, Patterson Scohol, 
Legerwood: Claude Eaton, Lundy Len- 
oir, Betty Wiese. 

St. James', Lenoir: Millard Caudle, 
Walter James Hogan, Robert Tolbert. 

St. Francis', Rutherfordton: George 
Bradley, William Bradley, G. Dennis 
Georgion. 

Calvary, Fletcher: Ann Caldwell 
Hayes, Ann Shuford. 

St. James', Hendersonville: Patsy 
Briggs, Ann Waldrop. 

St. Francis', Cherokee: Mary Ann 
Tahquette, John Bard Tyndall. 

St. Mark's, Gastonia: Freida Daven- 
port, Becky Ann Marshall. 

Redeemer, Asheville: Patricia Brown. 

There were 35 girls and 19 boys. 
However, the dozen or more boys in 
residence at Patterson School for the 
summer about evened up things for the 
evening programs which included chapel 
followed by campfires, skits, musical 
numbers, square dancing and a variety 
of antics. 



On Thursday evening the Rev. G. M. 
Jenkins, President of the Standing Com- 
mittee, Chairman of the Youth Com- 
mission, and Ghost-Story-Teller par ex- 
cellence, presided over a business session 
which voted unanimously to adopt as 
the project for Young Churchmen of the 
Diocese this summer and early fall the 
procurement of a Bishop's Staff or 
"crozier"' to be presented the Rev. M. 
G. Henry, Bishop-Elect, at his conse- 
cration. The offering at Corporate 
Communion the next morning was 
#16.32 and designated for this purpose. 

The Diocesan President of Young 
Churchmen, Miss Mary Aston Leavell, 
urged the campers to work on this pro- 
ject throughout the summer, and to 
raise additional funds necessary as soon 
as possible either through offerings or 
money-raising undertakings of their 
local young peoples' groups. Individual 
or corporate gifts for the crozier should 
be sent to her, Miss Mary Aston Leavell, 
301 S. King St., Morganton, N. C. 



St. John's, Marion 

Because of the generosity of a parish- 
ioner we were enabled to buy a Wur- 
litzer electronic organ to replace the old 
reed organ which had been in use for 
about thirty years. 

The Wurlitzer is a two manual instru- 
ment with Pedal Clavier, containing 14 
stops on the Great Organ, 12 on the 
Swell Organ, and six on the Pedal Or- 
gan, the tone being produced in the con- 
sole and amplified in a tone cabinet 
placed at a distance from the console. 
In addition to the main tone cabinet, an 
"Echo Organ'' cabinet has been added 
as a memorial given by Mrs. B. W. 
Harrison is memory of her husband and 
two sons. The main tone cabinet has 
been placed at the rear of the church 
about twenty feet from the floor level, 
the "Echo Organ" cabinet is placed be- 
hind the Sanctuary arch giving the ef- 
fect of the music coming from afar, and 
is very effective. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers o fthe Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



8 



Wayne D. Jarrett, a young man in 
his early twenties, is the organist. 

A branch of The Order of St. Vincent 
for Acolytes has been organized with a 
membership of six, under the direction 
of the Rector and Wayne D. Jarrett, a s 
Warden. Four of the boys, the Warden, 
and Rector, attended the festival ser- 
vices for acolytes, held in St. Mary's 
Church, Asheville, on the afternoon of 
Trinity Sunday. The Sunday School 
continues to grow, so much so, that the 
only two class rooms we have are getting 
crowded. We are using the St. James' 
Course of Lessons, and are glad to re- 
port that the interest on the part of the 
children is very encouraging. How 
proud they were when they won the 
banner for the highest per capita Lenten 
Offering awarded by the Morganton 
Convocation ! 



St. Stephen's, Morganton, 
To Build 

Preliminary plans for St. Stephen's 
Mission have been approved, and work 
drawings are being made with the hope 
of letting the contract at an early date. 
The plan calls for a church building 
which will seat approximately one hun- 
dred persons. It will be 26 feet wide 
in the nave, 36 in the chancel, with an 
over-all length of 41 feet. A full base- 
ment under the chancel will afford space 
for informal activities and gatherings, 
and possibly a kitchen. 

The amount of cost and cash on hand 
will determine somewhat the type of 
material to be used. One plan calls for 
cinder-block spray-painted inside to re- 
semble stone, with a stucco finish out- 
side. Members of St. Stephen's already 
are at work in raising funds, and the 
Diocesan Woman's Auxiliary adopted 
the new St. Stephen's as this year's Ad- 
vance Work project for All Saints' Day 
Offering. Several thousand dollars to- 
wards the new structure are in the hands 
of the Trustees of the Diocese from the 
sale of the lots on which the present St. 
Stephen's stands, but it is certain addi- 
tional funds will be needed. Overtures 



to the National Council for aid have 
also been made, but no definite amount 
has as yet been allocated. 



BUY 

NOW! 

US Security Bonds 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A.M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

"Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



Is a clergyman who is canonic ally 
resident in the Diocese, but who has not 
been canonically resident for six months 
preceding the Convention, a member of 
the Convention? 

According to article 2 of our Consti- 
tution he is not. This article very defin- 
itely defines the groups that compose 
the Convention, and, he is not included. 
Canon 1, however, leaves out the six 
months requirement. In fact, it requires 
the Ecclesiastical Authority to give his 
name to the Secretary to be called, ap- 
pended to the Journal and sent to the 
Secretary of the General Convention. 
I would say, therefore, that he is ex- 
pected to attend Convention, is en- 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Eool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



titled to a seat without vote. Sometimes 
the Convention votes to give such a man 
a voice in the proceedings. 

Must a vacant parish get the approval 
of the Bishop before it elects a rector? 

Canon 46 of the General Church is 
our guide in this matter. This canon 
says : 

1. The parish must make known to 
the Bishop the name of the man it pro- 
poses to elect. 

2. The parish must send written 
notice of the election to the Ecclesiastical 
Authority. 

3. "If the Ecclesiastic Authority be 
satisfied that the person so chosen is a 
duly qualified minister, and that he has 
accepted the office, the notice shall be 
sent to the Secretary of the Convention, 
who shall record it." 

Is "Dogma" necessary? 

This question implies that the one 
who asked it is not quite sure as to 
what "Dogma" is. A dogma is a re- 
ligious doctrine which has been recog- 
nized by the Christian Church as a vital 
belief for all its members. For example, 
when a Christian says "I believe in God 
the Father Almighty" he is uttering a 
dogma which is a vita lbelief for all who 
call themselves Christian. Dogma may 
be said to be as necessary for the Chris- 
tian Church as a skeleton is for the 
human body. Dogmas are clashing all 
over the world. That is why preaching 
and teaching are so necessary. They 
should help the Christian to assert true 
dogmas, to believe what is true. 



The Bishop-Elect of Western 
North Carolina 

(Editorial in North Carolina 
C /lurch man) 

In his 38th year, with plenty of vigor, 
with an intellectual and ministerial back- 
ground that has laid the foundation for 
both scholarship and fluency of speech, 
with as varied an experience as most 
any young man could accumulate in so 
short a time, — rural, small town, and 



10 



city pastoral work, — this young man has 
accepted the Episcopacy, which carries 
with it labors abundant and a challenge 
which few realize. 

Mr. Henry takes into his new field a 
more intimate knowledge of the running 
of his present Diocese than almost any 
other priest, especially where finances 
and missions are concerned. He seems 
to appreciate the needs of rural people, 
and how they have been neglected, as 
shown by his report on Diocesan Mis- 
sions at our recent Convention. He 
likes the out-of-doors. Simplicity of life 
and naturalness of conversation enable 
him to make friends easily. He loves 
people. His ability and leadership in 
organization have recruited many new 
people to become enthusiastic Church 
members. He possesses a sense of 
humor which is winning, while his ser- 
iousness of purpose and endeavor fur- 
ther enable him to win a following. He 
revels in undertaking any difficult task. 

It is pleasing to his many friends that 
he will remain a Tar Heel. For his 
presence at the Thompson Orphanage, 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



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feVE^O 




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if 



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lyj.\jJl^ULjL/l\/ -.SYRACUSE': NY + Si 

nf^ HIGHEST • SKILLED ■ CRiAFTSMflNSHrP fTtH 
XXX ORIGINAL • DESIGNS X X X !• 



Tnc Patterson School 




Episcopal, School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of '.Ye stern North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. r /iese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



>0 B* V* Hol&£9, 
15 Sdgencmt M*; 




1 CENT 1 



at Saint Mary's School, and at many a 
gathering will enable his friends to con- 
tinue to keep in close touch with him. 

May God bless him and his new 
diocese ! 



Bishop Gordon's Consecration 

(From the North Carolina 
Churchman) 
Even though the Diocese of North 
Carolina was organized in 1 81 7, when 
the Rev. William Jones Gordon, Jr., 
was consecrated Bishop of Alaska on 
May 18th it was the third time that 
such a service has taken place in Raleigh. 



The others were Bishop Lyman on De- 
cember 11, 1873, and Bishop Delaney 
on November 21, 1918. 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 



1, 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XIX 



AUGUST, 1948 



NO. 4 




Grace Church, Waynesville 



©tj? 2ftgijian& 
ffitjurrljman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, Elect, The Rev. M. George 
Henry. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest. Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



The Semi-Annual Report 

The paper you are now reading is an 
organ of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, published by the. Department 
of Promotion. As the rector and mem- 
bers of St. Mary's, Asheville, can testify, 
an organ can very often give out some 
very sour notes, and this promotional 
organ very often does when it has to 
publish and speak about the financial 
report of the Diocesan Treasurer. 

We have said before and shall con- 
tinue to say until there is a very marked 
change for the better, that these reports 
which must be published every quarter 
are shameful revelations. And if we are 
not shamed by the revealing to ourselves 
of our inconstancy and slip-shod pay- 
ment of debts, we might be when we 
realize that these reports are read by 
many outside our Diocese, the National 
Council included. 

There are few churches within this 
Diocese, located in a vacation area, 
which do not experience their period of 
greatest activity during the summer 
months. In most places many more 
people are attending our services during 
the summer and making substantial con- 



tributions. And even if they were not, 
there is no sound reason why congrega- 
tion after congregation should have paid 
nothing whatsoever up to June 30th, and 
there is little excuse for many having 
given only a fraction of the half which 
is due. We have elected a bishop and 
yet we are $953.35 short of what should 
be paid on assessment which will go in 
part to his support. And we have mis- 
sionaries in the diocese and throughout 
the world, and yet we are $4,927.73 
short on quota which is to pay the cost 
of keeping them alive. 

When there are eleven parishes far 
below the half-way mark in payments 
on their assessments, and ten far below 
what is expected on their quotas, we 
wonder if "self-supporting parish" isn't 
too apt a description. 

The worst offenders on both sides of 
the ledger are the missions. It would 
seem that many of them have gone soft 
from too much easy living supported by 
the Diocese or other agencies. A vener- 
able priest in the Diocese made reference 
not so long ago to the missions receiving 
so much "free grace" that they have lost 
all desire to make any earnest effort.. 
The list of non-payers seems to bear out 
his contention. 



OUR DEEPEST SYMPATHY 

We extend our deepest sympathy to 
the Rev. George Floyd and Mrs. Rogers 
for their loss of a grandson. George 
Floyd Rogers, III. Young George Floyd 
was a victim of infantile paralysis. 
While at a camp near Brevard this sum- 
mer, he was one of four stricken with 
polio. He was taken to an Asheville 
hospital immediately, but failed to re- 
spond to treatment and died within a 
few days. 

The parents are Mr. and Mrs. Carol 
Rogers of Burnsville. George Floyd 
was the maternal grandson of the Rev. 
and Mrs. George Floyd Rogers. Fun- 
eral services were held at Trinity 
Church, Rev. John Tuton officiating. 



OUR COVER 

Grace Church, Waynesville. The 
Rev. Ed^ar Goold is rector. 



Consecration Date 
Set Tentatively 

Pending the receipt in time of a suf- 
ficient number of consents from bishops 
and standing committees, a tentative 
date of September 15th has been set 
for the consecration of the Rev. M. 
George Henry as Bishop of the Diocese 
of Western Xorth Carolina. With many 
bishops out of the country attending the 
Lambeth Conference, and the uncer- 
tainty of standing committees meeting 
during the summer months, it is not yet 
certain that a majority of the necessary 
consents can be received and order taken 
by the Presiding Bishop by September 
15th. 

When the consecration is held, it will 
be in Trinity Church, Asheville, with 
the Rev. John Tuton and Fr. Gale 
Webbe as masters of ceremonies. The 
bishop-elect's attending presbyters will 
be the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Sr., and 
the Rev. W. C. Leach. 



GIFTS PLANNED FOR BISHOP-ELECT 

The list of gifts which will be pre- 
sented to the Rev. M. George Henry, 
bishop-elect of the Episcopal diocese of 
Western Xorth Carolina, upon his con- 
secration, has been announced by the 
Rev. Mark Jenkins, rector of Calvary 
church, Fletcher, and president of the 
standing committee of the diocese. 

The clergy of the diocese of Xorth 
Carolina will give him his vestments, 
and the Woman's auxiliary in Western 
Xorth Carolina will give the vestment 
case. 

The bishop's ring is being given by 
the men of Christ church, Charlotte, of 
which Air. Henry is rector, and women 
of the church will give the pectoral cross 
and the Youth Service league of the 
diocese of Xorth Carolina, will give his 
Bible. The Youth Service league of 
Christ church will present the bishop's 
book of offices, the young churchmen of 
this diocese will give the pastoral staff 
and carrying case, and the Rev. Alfred 
Cole of Charlotte, a personal friend, will 
present some books. 



BISHOP'S RESIDENCE PURCHASED 

A residence for the Bishop of the 
Diocese has recently been purchased in 
Asheville. The house, which is located 
on Macon Avenue in the Grove Park 
section, replaces Schoenberger Hall on 
Ravenscroft Drive which served as the 
episcopal residence for the first two 
bishops of the Diocese. According to 
the accounts of those who have seen the 
house, it is very attractive, in sound con- 
dition, and is further enhanced by hav- 
ing a log cabin on the grounds which 
can readily be adapted as a study and 
diocesan office. 



VACANCIES NOW EXISTING 

The Bishop-Elect will be faced with 
the ever-present problem of filling va- 
cant cures throughout the Diocese. At 
present the following places have no 
rectors or priests: Asheville, Redeemer 
and Chunn's Cove; Brevard, St. Phil- 
lip's; Asheville, St. Matthias; Canton, 
St. Andrew's; Lincolnton, St. Luke's; 
Boone, St. Luke's; Rutherfordton, St. 
Gabriel's; Shelby, Redeemer. 



GRIBBIN JUNIOR ASSUMES NEW 
POST SOON 

It has been announced that the Rev. 
R. Emmet Gribbin is to become the 
chaplain to students at Clemson College 
and rector of the parish church of Holy 
Trinity, Clemson, S. C. In addition, 
Mr. Gribbin will teach in the Depart- 
ment of Religion of Clemson College. 
For the past two years Mr. Gribbin has 
been chaplain at Kenyon College, Gam- 
bier, Ohio, where he also served as rec- 
tor of the local parish and as priest in 
charge of a rural mission. His new work 
should prove a happy one for his friends 
in this Diocese, for he will inevitably 
show up at Kanuga. 



CAMPAIGN UNDER WAY 

A campaign has been started to raise 
at least $25,000 for the purchase of a 
bishop's residence. This campaign is 
under the chairmanship of Mr. V. Jor- 
dan Brown, who reports that already 
several thousand dollars has been con- 
tributed. 



3 



Mission Salaries 
To Change 

A radical change in the amount of 
mission salaries was proposed at the 
last Executive Council meeting when 
the Council met at Valle Crucis. On the 
basis of a recommendation from the De- 
partment of Missions, a motion was 
made and passed that mission salaries 
in 1949 meet a minimum of $2300 for 
single clergy and $2600 for married 
clergy. Where increases are necessary 
to bring present salaries up to this 
minimum, half of the increase will be 
met from the Diocesan Stipend Fund 
and half will be met by the congrega- 
tions served by the clergyman whose 
salary is to be changed. 

One important part of the plan for in- 
creasing mission salaries is that there 
will be more assumption of responsi- 
bility each year on the part of the aided 
parishes and missions. Each aided par- 
ish and mission will be asked to assume 
10 percent more each year, beginning 
with 1950. By thus working towards 
self-support, the aided parish and mis- 
sions will be put on a healthier basis, 
and the amounts from the 10 percent 
reductions will enable the Diocese to 
provide funds for new work. 



POLIO SITUATION AFFECTS 
CHURCH SERVICES 

The prevalence of poliomyletis 
throughout the Diocese has had its ad- 
verse effects on many of the programs 
of the Church. In compliance with the 
requests of health authorities, Sunday 
Schools and Bible Schools have had to 
close down. This is particularly true of 
the Churches in and around Asheville. 

One of the programs that has been 
hit particularly hard is that of the Rural 
Church Institute at Valle Crucis. At 
the completion of the first ten day period 
where Bible Schools were conducted in 
the Valle Crucis mission field, it was the 
plan to have several schools conducted 
by the students in Caldwell County. In 
former years schools had been success- 
fully conducted in Happy Valley, Har- 
per's Chapel and Buffalo Creek. On 



the advice of Caldwell County health 
authorities, this field work period had to 
be called off. And at the time this is 
written, it is still problematical as to 
whether or not schools and programs 
can be conducted in the missions of the 
Southwest. 

One of the victims of poliomyletis was 
the grandson of the Rev. George Floyd 
Rogers, George Floyd Rogers, III. 

After the Asheville Churches had 
complied with a request of the Health 
Department to close down all Sunday 
Schools, a new ruling went into effect 
which banned all Church services for 
children and adults alike. At a meeting 
of the City Council some of the clergy- 
men, although indicating that they 
would obey the new regulation, protest- 
ed the use of the term "non-essential" 
as applied to the services of the Church. 
A few days previous to the ban, a news 
item in the Asheville paper stated that 
movies, sports, Church services, and 
other non-essential activities might be 
prohibited. 

In the Sundays and Holy Days which 
have followed the observance of this 
quarantine, the priests in the three Ashe- 
ville Churches have continued the ser- 
vices of the worship of God. These 
services, of course, were not attended 
by the congregations. 



MR. REDWOOD REPORTS 

Speaking of the half-yearly reports of 
receipts from parishes and missions 
which appears elsewhere in the High- 
land Churchman, Mr. Redwood 
writes: "A little better, but still room 
for improvement. Your Treasurer is 
still in a receptive mood and would love 
to hear from those who have paid 'noth- 
ing during 1948'." 

Mr. Redwood has wrought some kind 
of miracle, for with receipts from the 
Diocese far below what they should be 
at the half year mark, the National 
Council reports show that the Diocese 
has paid $3,615.00. The quota for the 
Diocese for work of the General Church 
is $7,180.00 and only $2,991.62 was due 
on the first of June, 1948. 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH 

CAROLINA FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS 

January 1 to June 30 

Assessment Quota 

Made Paid PARISHES Made Paid 

891.53 $ 450.00 Asheville, Trinity $ 2,507.44 $ 1,772.19 

209.39 Asheville, St. Mary's 583.28 52.00 

99.66 Asheville, St. Matthias' 291.86 78.75 

794.15 265.82 Biltmore, All Souls' 2,233.55 490.20 

135.58 Brevard, St. Philip's 381.33 149.40 

90.76 Flat Rock, St. John's 255.26 

261.66 130.86 Fletcher, Calvary 735.90 335.96 

281.67 117.35 Gastonia, St. Mark's 792.20 415.00 

243.27 121.66 Hendersonville, St. James' 684.25 263.78 

226.57 Hickory, Ascension 637.22 55.00 

175.43 73.10 Lenoir, St. James' 495.39 194.80 

167.64 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 471.56 92.44 

136.09 68.04 Marion. St. John's 382.74 213.74 

398.18 Morganton, Grace 1.119.88 730.77 

233.95 Rutherlordton, St. Francis' 657.98 24.49 

451.29 188.05 Trvon. Holv Cross 1,269.25 530.22 

101.07 101.07 Waynesville. Grace 284.29 200.00 

63.86 47.85 Wil'kesboro, St. Paul's 179.42 134.58 



35.00 


35.00 


35.73 




16.72 


16.72 


17.49 




10.00 




10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


87.27 




30.00 




24.91 


24.91 


60.54 




6.00 




13.11 




61.55 




10.00 


5.50 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


52.36 


52.36 


10.00 


10.00 


25.00 


25.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


20.00 




12.00 




10.00 


10.00 


18.00 


18.00 


30.50 


30.50 


10.00 


10.00 


67.30 


67.30 


10.00 




10.00 




43.00 


32.25 


12.00 





$4,959.69 $1.442.14 TOTAL $13,942.68 $ 5,834.98 

MISSIONS 

Arden, Christ School 85.00 

Asheville, The Redeemer 100.50 

Asheville. St. Luke's 49.03 27.03 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel 49.18 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 80.10 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 21.55 

Bessemer City. St. Andrew's 29.30 52.40 

Black Mountain, St. James 245.43 

Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. 56.84 

Boone, St. Luke's 70.06 70.06 

Canton. St. Andrew's 190.29 

Cullowhee. St. David's 18.50 

Ednevville. St. Paul's 36.87 42.92 

Franklin. St. Agnes 193.10 8.33 

Franklin. St. Cyprian's 16.25 27.58 

Glen Alpine. St. Paul's ____ 12.00 7.29 

Glendale Springs. Holy Trinity 17.30 



High Shoals. St. John's 21.11 21.11 

Highlands, Incarnation 147.26 103.63 

Hot Springs. St. John's 10.00 10.00 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 81.95 

Lincolnton. St. Cyprian's 18.33 

Lincoln. Woodside. Our Saviour 37.15 26.00 

Tittle Switzerland. Resurrection 30.50 

Morganton, St. Marv's 60.12 49.58 

Morganton. St. Stephen's 13.82 6.84 

Murphv, Messiah 52.58 64.18 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 85.99 ______ 

Saluda. Transfiguration 55.00 55.00 

Shelbv. The Redeemer 189.30 59.80 

Sylva, St. Tohn's 115.94 

Todd, St. Matthew's 8 25 

Valle Crucis, Holv Cross 13 3.96 243.27 

Asheville. Grace _' 17.70 

Blackstone. Mission 5.00 

10.00 Cashiers. Good Shepherd 10.00 

10.00 Cherokee. St. Francis of Assisi 13.00 3.26 

Ednevville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton. St. Paul's 

Lincolnton. St. Stephen's 

12.00 Linville. All Saints . 24.40 

Morganton. St. Elizabeth's 

12.00 12.00 Penland. Good Shenherd 30.55 83.20 

6.00 Rutherfordton. Missions 8.00 

10.00 10.00 Trvon. Good Shepherd 11.00 11.00 

12.00 12.00 Upward, St. John Baptist 61.00 

6.00 Valle Crucis, St. Tohn Baptist 10.00 



$ 895.69 $ 411.54 TOTAL $ 2,358.57 $ 932.48 



$5,855.38 $1,975. 34_____________ _TOTAL ,$16,301.25 $ 6,645. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
CONFERENCE CANCELLED 

A Conference scheduled to be held at 
Valle Crucis during the week of August 
2nd has been cancelled due to the un- 
certain conditions prevailing during the 
polio epidemic. There seems to be little 
likelihood that conditions will be any 
better than at present, so it was deemed 
wise to postpone the conference until 
another year. Miss Lucy Fletcher, 
Diocesan President, is hopeful that next 
year the plan for having such a diocesan- 
wide conference can be carried through. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Attendance at the twenty-sixth an- 
nual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of our Diocese, held at the Chapel of 
the Transfiguration, Kanuga Lake, Hen- 
dersonville, June 3 and 4, included rep- 
resentatives from 32 branches (92 dele- 
gates), several clergy, the speakers, the 
mission workers, and the visitors. High- 
lighting the meeting was the address by 
Bishop John Bently, former Bishop of 
Alaska, and at present a vice-president 
of the National Council. He told of the 
tremendous task our Church is perform- 
ing in the different parts of the world. 
A few highlights of hsi excellent address 
are as follows: There are three mis- 
sionary districts in China, Anking, Han- 
kow, and Shanghai. The Chinese Church 
is independent with ten dioceses. We 
still assist there with teachers and medi- 
cal leaders. The workfl in the Philip- 
pines is steadily growing and needs much 
from us. The church in A4exico is going 
through difficult times, but Bishop Sal- 
inas is carrying on in a noble way. The 
Rt. Rev. Louis Melcher is the new 
Bishop-coadjutor of Brazil. As Bentley 
spoke of the work in Puerto Rico, Li- 
beria, and Alaska, we felt an especial 
pride and joy because Bishop Boynton 
was formerly at Christ School, Bishop 
Harris is from North Carolina, and 
Bishop Gordeon, the newly consecrated 
Bishop of Alaska, is also from North 
Carolina. "Interest comes through 



knowledge", Bishop Bentley reminded 
us. "Three things only are placed on 
the altars of our churches: the Holy 
Communion, the Prayer Book, and Of- 
ferings. Go ye into all the world". 

The report of our President, Miss 
Lucy Fletcher, showed that great pro- 
gress had been made during the past 
year by the woman's auxiliary in West- 
ern North Carolina. The reports of all 
the Diocesan Officers, showed not only 
great prgoress in their respective fields, 
but untiring work on their part for the 
spreading of Christ's Kingdom. One 
way in which our auxiliary is helping to 
spread Christ's Kingdom, was the unani- 
mous vote to send $250 to aid an over- 
seas mission. It was voted to give the 
"Advance Fund'" to the Negro Church 
in Morganton. 

The following offficers were elected: 

Director of the Third District: Mrs. 
Donnell Van Noppen 

Director of the Fourth District: Mrs. 
R. L. Sanborn. 

Chairman of Missions: Mrs. Mark 
Dickerson. 

Chairman of Supply: Mrs. Alex Men- 
zies. 

Chairman of Promotion: Mrs. Robert 
B. Campbell. 

We left the annual meeting at lovely 
Lake Kanuga with the words of our 
President, Miss Fletcher, foremost in 
our thoughts: "We must give of our- 
selves, and our prayers, as well as our 
gifts, if we are to spread Christ's King- 
dom on earth." 



The Highland Churchman regrets 
that space did not allow for a complete 
list of the Auxiliary officers to be printed 
in this issue. It had been planned for a 
permanent masthead to be printed on 
the Auxiliary page. 

All Auxiliary news should be sent to 
Mrs. R. B. Campbell, Hickory, N. C. 
News items should reach her in time to 
meet the deadline of the 20th of each 
month. 



UNITED THANK OFFERING 

DIOCESE WESTERN NORTH 

CAROLINA 

SPRING, 1948 

FIRST DISTRICT 

Asheville, Trinity $290.34 

Asheville, Grace Mission 32.35 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel 

Haw Creek 11.00 

Asheville, Church of 

the Redeemer 27.00 

Biltmore, All Souls 76.85 

Canton, St. Andrews ._•_ 32.50 

Fletcher, Calvary _ 68.40 

Franklin, St. Agnes 23.00 

Highlands. Incarnation 16.60 

Murphy, Messiah 27.70 

Cherokee, St. Francis 6.00 

Waynesville, Grace 18.67 

SECOND DISTRICT 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 

Brevard, St. Phillips, 

Woman's Auxiliary ._ 38.77 

Brevard, St. Philips, 

St. Anne's Guild 32.10 

Edneyville, St. James 6.10 

Saluda, Transfiguration 5.00 

Tryon, Holy Cross 319.42 

THIRD DISTRICT 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 4.00 

Boone, St. Luke's 8.73 

Hickory, Ascension 85.84 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 13.00 

Lenoir, St. James 50.00 

Marion, St. John's 41.50 

Morganton, Grace 132.36 

Morganton, St. Mary's 8.22 

Yalle Crucis, Holv Cross __ 22.35 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 12.50 

FOURTH DISTRICT 

Bessemer City, St. Andrews 10.25 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 101.55 

High Shoals, St. John's 7.00 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's _ 15.00 

Lincolnton, Church of Our Savior 5.25 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis 108.92 

Shelby, Church of the Redeemer 35.42 

St. Luke's, Chunn's Cove 13.40 



FIFTH DISTRICT 

Asheville, St. Matthias 19.15 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 16.00 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 3.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 5.00 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 1.75 

Individuals 24.53 

TOTAL $1,860.89 

Respectfully submitted, 
Elizabeth C. Wise, 
Treasurer 
Lmited Thank Offering. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETS AT 
VALLE CRUCIS 

The Executive Council had its regular 
summer meeting at Valle Crucis where 
it was the guest of the Rural Church 
Institute. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
DIOCESAN OFFICERS 

President: Miss Lucy T. Fletcher, 165 
Macon Ave., Asheville. 

Vice-President: Mrs. E. L. Kemper. 
3110 Miles Road, Shelby. 

Secretary: Miss Jessie Huff, Beaver 
Dam Road. Asheville. 

Treasurer: Mrs. May T. New, Box 
1361, Gastonia. 

Lnited Thank Offering Custodian: 
Mrs. George Wiese, Ledgerwood. 

Secretary Christian Education: Mrs. 
Mark Jenkins, Fletcher. 

Secretary Christian Social Relations: 
Mrs. George Fletcher, 1900 Arlington 
Place, Hendersonville. 

Secretary Supply: Mrs. Alex Menzies, 
12 Street, Hickory. 

Secretary Missions: Mrs. Mark Dick- 
erson, Rutherfordton. 

Secretary of Promotion: Mrs. Robert 
B. Campbell, Box 577, Hickory. 



AUXILIARY NEWS FLASHES 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the Church 
of the Holy Cross, Tryon, held a suc- 
cessful birthday Thank Offering Meet- 
ing, June 14th, at the home of Mrs. 
Margaret Range. The offering arount- 
ed to $31.37. 



McKEOWN TO LEAVE BOONE 
FIELD 

The Rev. James McKeown, priest-in- 
charge of St. Luke's, Boon, and the al- 
lied churches in Ashe County, has ac- 
cepted a call to All Saints' Church, 
Camerno, in the Diocese of Texas. Fr. 
McKeown will assume his new work on 
the first of September. He and Mrs. 
McKeown and their two children will 
leave during the middle of August, going 
to Texas by way of Florida, their native 
state. 

Fr. McKeown came to Boon in June, 
1946, immediately after his advance- 
ment to the priesthood. This was his 
first charge. Following his graduation 
from the seminary at Sewanee, he took 
a year's graduate study in rural work 
at Drew Seminary, Madison, N. J. 
While still in seminary, he had spent 
one summer in charge of the work at 
Murphy. In addition to his work in 
Boone and Ashe County, he was chaip- 
lain to Episcopal students at Appala- 
chian State Teachers College, Boone, 
Field Secretary for the Rural Church 
Institute at Valle Crucis, and a Trustee 
of the University of the South. 



MRS. McKINSEY NO LONGER 
AT GLENDALE 

Mrs. Eloise McKinsey, formerly the 
mission worker at Holy Trinity, Glen- 
dale Springs, has not been there for 
nearly a year. She has requested The 
Highland Churchman to make this 
announcement in order to avoid the 
present influx of mail and packages that 
concern the mission at Glendale. Mrs. 
McKinsey spent last winter taking ad- 
ditional work at Philadelphia Divinity 
School and is now doing mission work 
in Michigan. 



ST. JAMES CHURCH, LENOIR 

By The Rev. J. B. Sill 
As in the case of St. Luke's, Lincoln- 
ton, we find the ministry of "Parton" 
Miller connected with the beginnings of 
St. James', Lenoir. Although ordained 
to the Lutheran ministry, he always 
maintained that he belonged to the 
American Episcopal Church. Having 



come from England, he was a loyal 
member of the Church of England, and 
as a layman befare his Lutheran ordina- 
tion, he organized others at White Hav- 
en who had belonged to the English 
Church. We had no Bishop in North 
Carolina in those days. From 1811-1821 
we find Parson Miller having charge of 
St. Andrew's Chapel, five miles from 
Lenoir, which was admitted into union 
with the Diocese of North Carolina in 
1823. At the convention of the diocese 
in 1821, Parson Miller was ordained to 
the priesthood by Bishop Moore of Vir- 
ginia. He was than 60 years old. He 
built up a large rural parish at St. An- 
drews before his death in 1834. 

It seemed best in 1841, Lenoir having 
become a county seat, to move St. An- 
drew's congregation there. The Rev. E. 
M. Forbes was missionary in charge, 
services being held in the Court House 
once a month. A church was built in 
1846 on land given by E. P. Miller, a son 
of Parson Miller. The original church, 
which was a frame building, has given 
place to the present structure. The 
church was consecrated in 1853. The 
Church at Lenoir can be considered the 
oldest formed congregation in the Dio- 
cese, changing its name from St. An- 
drew's to St. James. 

Two rectors of the early days of 
St. James Church were well known 
beyond the parochial limits. The Rev. 
H. H. Prout from 1851 to 1858, and The 
Rev. J. A. Oertel from 1869 to 1874. 
Mr. Prout had been connected with the 
school and missionary work at Valle 
Crucis for several years. He started a 
day school for children and continued 
his missionary interests in forming a 
congregation and building a log chapel 
in the Happy Valley section. This was 
the beginning of the growth of the 
Church as it now appears in the well 
known Patterson School. 

The other well known rector in the 
early days, The Rev. Johannes A. 
Oertel, was a celebrated artist. He came 
to the parish as a deacon, and was made 
priest there in 1871. He had come to 
the United States from Bavaria in 1848, 



first settling in New Jersey. His best 
known painting is "The Rock of Ages", 
picturing a woman hanging to a cross in 
the midst of waves of the sea. Four 
large paintings representing "The Re- 
demption of Mankind 1 '' which he com- 
pleted towards the end of his life, are 
hung in the chapel at the University of 
the South, Sewanee, Tenn. They are 
given the title, "A Vision Realized" in 
the story of his life by his son. Being 
also a wood carver, there is a reredos 
of his at St. James which is well worth 
seeing. The central panel has a painting 
of Our Saviour administering to com- 
municants. Dr. Oertel was a faithful 
pastor. He served two mission churches 
near Lenoir, one the Chapel of Peace, 
and with his wife and others started day 
schools for children. 



BISHOPS WELCOMED AT LAMBETH, 
ENGLAND 

A formal reception held in Canterbury 
Cathedral on July 1st brought Anglican 
bishops from all over the world together 
to confer on the problems which face the 
Church today. On the spot marking 
the arrival of St. Augustine to England 
1,400 years ago, and seated in the chair 
of St. Augustine before the high altar, 
the Archbishop of Canterbury welcomed 
the visiting bishops by saying that the 
Anglican Communion today is visibly 
"no longer English or British, or Anglo- 
Saxon". Speaking of the unity which 
holds this Communion together in the 
nations of the world, he continued: "In 
what we call the Anglican tradition we 
have a trust which God commits to us. 
That tradition first acquired its distinc- 
tive form here after the days of the Re- 
lormation: and though now it is shared 
by all the Churches of our Communion, 
its three distinguishing marks remain 
the same. We hold the faith and order, 
doctrine and worship, which from the 
beginning was the possession of the un- 
divided Church. 



The hands of Christ seem very frail 
For they were broken by a nail; 
But only they reach Heaven at last 
Whom His frail, broken hands hold fast. 



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Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
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Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A.M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



PENLAND. N. C. 

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1400 TO ATTEND AMSTERDAM 
ASSEMBLY OF CHURCHES 

One hundred and forty-two churches 
in 42 countries will be represented at the 
first constituent assembly of the World 
Council of Churches to be held August 
22-September 5 in Amsterdam. Among 
them is the Episcopal Church which will 
be represented by Presiding Bishop 
Henry Knox Sherrill, Bishop Angus Dun 
of the Diocese of Washington, the Very 
Rev. William H. Nes, dean of the Nash- 
otah House, and Charles P. Taft, presi- 
dent of the Federal Council of Churches. 

Churches in Japan, Siam and Formosa 
are among the latest to accept member- 
ship in the World Council and Russia is 
the only major nation still unrepresent- 
ed. The Russian Orthodox Church has 
been invited to membership but no final 
decision has yet been taken by the Mos- 
cow Patriarchate nor has .a definite ac- 
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or Roumania. The Roman Catholic 
Church has indicated it will send ob- 
servers. 

Approximately 1,400 persons are ex- 
pected to attend the conference, includ- 
ing 450 delegates; 350 alternate dele- 
gates; 100 youth delegates and 500 con- 
sultants, accredited visitors, press repre- 
sentatives and observers. 

This first meeting of the World Coun- 
cil of Churches comes after many years 
of preparation. As early as 1854 there 
have been notable gatherings of world- 
wide Christian missionary groups. The 
Edinburgh World Missionary Confer- 
ence held in 1910 marked the first time 
that the meetings were attended by of- 
ficially appointed delegates. This con- 
ference, by establishing a continuation 
committee (which later became the In- 
ternational Missionary Council) and by 
giving impetus to the creation of the 
Committee on Life and W T ork of the 
Churches, and the World Conference on 
Faith and Order laid the groundwork for 
the establishment of the World Council. 

Following the first world war num- 
erous smaller conferences were held by 
each of the two groups, Life and Work, 
and Faith and Order, leading to a meet- 
ing in 1938 at L^trecht, Holland, when a 
group representing the two groups as 
well as other ecumenical Christian move- 
ments such as the International Mis- 
sionary Council, the World's Student 
Christian Federation, the Young Men's 
Christian Association, and the Young 
Women's Christian Association, drafted 
a constitution for the proposed World 
Council of Churches. The second world 
war, of course, delayed further action on 
a world wide basis although various sec- 
tional meetings were held. 

In the 10 years since the Utrecht 
meeting, however, 142 churches have 
voted in their ecclesiastical bodies to en- 
ter the proposed World Council. This 
number includes practically all the An- 
glican Churches, a number of Eastern 
Orthodox Churches, all but two or three 
of the largest Protestant communions 
and many churches of Asia, Africa, 
Latin America and the Pacific islands. 

"These churches are not coming to 



10 



Amsterdam with the thought of being 
absorbed in one single unified World 
Church," explains Dr. W. A. Visser 't 
Hooft, General Secretary, World Coun- 
cil of Churches." 

''They are not setting up a centralized 
organ to speak and act in their name. 
They are not planning to create an ec- 
clesiastical parallel to the United Na- 
tions. What they intend to do is some- 
thing much simpler, but no less impor- 
tant. They desire to enter into a con- 
tinuing relationship to each other, so as 
to collaborate regularly in matters of 
common concern, to render a common 
witness whenever possible and to deal 
with the question of Christian unity in 
a Christian manner. They will meet in 
grateful recognition of the unity which 
already exists and will engage in frank 
discussion of their differences. 

''The Assembly will necessarily give 
considerable time to such questions as 
the constitution, the membership, the 
organization and the program of the 
World Council in the coming years. 

"Nevertheless the major emphasis 



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must be on . . . the great pressing chal- 
lenges which face the churches today. 
These are mainly four: Is the Church 
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SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 
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Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

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12 



Cjjttrcjtnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XIX 



OCTOBER, 1948 



NO. 5 





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RT. REV. MATTHEW GEORGE HENRY 

Bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



GUjurrtfman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, Elect, The Rev. M. George 
Henry. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



A NECESSARY CAMPAIGN 

It must sometimes seem to Churchmen 
of the Diocese that one campaign for 
funds follows hard upon another; and 
yet, although there have been many de- 
mands made on the generosity of our 
diocesan membership, these calls have 
been for causes outside our borders. It 
has been many years since the Diocese has 
had to resort to special appeals for aid 
in carrying on its work. Now we are 
faced with a situation which can be met 
only by everyone participating in a 
necessary campaign to raise $50,000. 

With the election of a bishop it became 
apparent that a smaller, more modern 
home would have to be provided. Forced 
to take action within a limited time, the 
Trustees succeeded in finding an attrac- 
tive, well-constructed house at 46 Macon 
Avenue in Asheville. The purchase price 
and cost of repairs has brought the total 
needed to $27,000. 

The campaign that is now going on has 
two phases: the first is to provide enough 
money to pay for the episcopal residence 
and the second is to provide an increase to 



the Episcopal Endowment Fund. This En- 
dowment Fund is designed to produce 
income from which the Bishop's salary is 
paid. At present the Fund actually pro- 
duces only about $2,000 per year, and it 
has been necessary to assess the parishes 
and missions rather heavily to make up 
the difference. 

Mr. A. B. Stoney, Co-Chairman for the 
campaign committee in the Convocation 
of Morganton, wrote to each church in 
the Convocation: 

"If each communicant in our Diocese 
gives an average of $11.00 we will raise 
$50,050.00. Therefore, we are using the 
$11.00 each as a figure to strive for, know- 
ing that many can and will want to give 
more and that many will not be able to 
give this amount. We hope and pray that 
this sum for our Bishop's residence and 
endowment will be contributed to by 
all. We want all to have a share no mat- 
ter how small or how large each gift may 
be. Let us share this responsibility to- 
gether." 

A good start has been made; but at the 
present juncture it is only a start. In 
another place in THE HIGHLAND 
CHURCHMAN we print a list of the 
parishes and missions from which con- 
tributions have come. No individual don- 
or is mentioned, but credit is given to his 
church. This list shows that at presstime 
there is a sum of $17,855.70 pledged or 
given to the residence and endowment 
campaign. Surely the generosity' that has 
been manifest in the past three years, 
when we were called upon to give to Re- 
construction Advance and to the Fund 
for World Relief, will again be shown in 
the response to this call from within our 
household. 

Prior to his acceptance every effort 
was made to prove to Bishop Henry that 
he would be coming to a Diocese which 
would uphold his hand and work with 
him to the strengthening of God's work. 
Having convinced him that Western 
North Carolina was a Diocese worthv of 
asking him to consecrate the rest of his 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The Rev. Matthew George Henry Consecrated Bishop 



The Rev. Matthew George Henry was consecrated bishop of the diocese of West- 
ern North Carolina in an impressive ceremony at Trinity Episcopal Church, the third 
bishop of the diocese and the first consecrated in Asheville. 

The Rt. Rev. Henry St. George Tucker, lately presiding Bishop of the Episcopal 
Church in the United States, consecrated the new Bishop, assisted by the Rt. Rev. Henry 
Disbrow Phillips, D. D., Bishop of Southwestern Virginia, and the Rt. Rev. Thomas 
Neely Carruthers, D. D., Bishop of South Carolina. 

The procession entered the Church as the assembly sang "Ye Watchers and Ye 
Holy Ones," and "The Church's One Foundation," proceeding in four groups each led 
by a crucifer. 

The flag bearers and the choir were in the first group. In the second were the 
Rev. Gale Dudley Webbe, rector of St. Mary's Church, as assistant master of ceremonies, 
and lay members of the standing committee, the executive council, trustees of the dio- 
cese, and the vestry of Christ Church, Charlotte. Bishop Henry came to Asheville from 
Christ Church. 

In the third group came representatives of other communions and the clergy of 
the diocese and visiting clergy. 

Representing other communions in the diocese were the Rev. J. White Iddings, 
pastor of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, the Rev. W. Perry Crouch, D. D., pastor of the 
First Baptist Church, and the Rev. C. Grier Davis, D. D., pastor of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church. 

The last group included the Rev. John Walter Tuton, rector of Trinity and master 
of ceremonies; the readers of testimonials — the Rev. James P. Burke of St. James, Hen- 
dersonville, Kingsland Van Winkle, the Rev. Ralph K. Webster, of St. Francis', Ruth- 
erfordton, the Rev. Mark Jenkins, of Calvary, Fletcher, and the Rt. Rev. John James 
Gravatt, D. D., Bishop of Upper South Carolina; the Rev. Charles Grubbs Leavell as 
deputy registrar; the Rev. Boston McGee Lackey, St. James', Lenoir, and the Rev. Wil- 
bur Cleon Leach, Church of the Holy Cross, Valle Crucis, as attending presbyters; 
Bishop-elect Henry; the attending Bishops; the Rt. Rev. Charles Blayney Colmore, 
D. D., retired Bishop of Puerto Rico, and the Rt. Rev. Henry Wright, D. D., Bishop of 
East Carolina as presenting Bishops; the co-consecrators and the consecrator. 

Bishop Tucker began the service for ordaining a Bishop with the service of Holy 
Communion according to the Book of Common Prayer. The epistle was read by the 
Rt. Rev. Charles Colcock Jones Carpenter, D. D., Bishop of Alabama. The gospel was 
read by Bishop Phillips. 

The sermon, one of instruction and inspiration for the Bishop-elect, was preached 
by the Rt. Rev. Edwin Anderson Penick, D. D., Bishop of North Carolina, who con- 
cluded with a personal charge to Bishop-elect Henry. 

Following the sermon, Bishop Colmore and Bishop Wright presented Bishop-elect 
Henry for consecration, and the testimonials were presented. 

Mr. Burke presented evidence of election; Mr. Van Winkle, chancellor of the 
diocese and senior warden of All Souls, presented the canonical testimonial; Mr. Web- 
ster presented evidence of ordinations; Mr. Jenkins presented the consents of the stand- 
ing committees, and Bishop Gravatt presented the consents of the bishops. 



In a firm, strong voice, Bishop Henry made the promise of conformity to the doc- 
trine, discipline, and worship of the Church: 

"In the Name of God, Amen, I, Matthew George Henry, chosen Bishop of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Western North Carolina, do promise 
conformity and obedience to the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States of America. So help me God, through Jesus 
Christ." 

The litany for ordination was said by the Rt. Rev. George Purnell Gunn, D. D., 
Bishop-coadjutor of the Diocese of Southern Virginia. 

Then, the laying on of hands took place, and the young clergyman was consecrated 
as the third Bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina. 

The service of Holy Communion followed, with the Bishops, the members of the 
new Bishop's family, the clergy and lay members in the procession being communi- 
cated. 

The choir of Trinity Church was augmented by the choir of All Souls Episcopal 
Church and Kenilworth and First Presbyterian Churches. Forrest Wood of St. Mary's 
and Thomas B. Hutchins of Christ Church, Charlotte, were servers. Mrs. Edwin A. 
Heers, organist and choir director of Trinity and Josef Privette organist and choir di- 
rector of All Souls, directed the music. 

The procession retired as the assembly sang "The Son of God Goes Forth to War" 
and "Lead On, O King Eternal." 

The Rev. Isaac Northup, rector of All Souls Church, served as commentator for 
the services, which were broadcast over radio station WWNC, WLOS. and WSKY 
here, and over WCIV, Charlotte. 

The flowers banked on the altar were in memory of the Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, 
D. D., Bishop of the missionary district of North Carolina, first Bishop of Western 
North Carolina. 



A NECESSARY CAMPAIGN TEACHING MISSION AT 

(Continued from Page 2) ST. MARY'S 

life to it, we must grasp this first signal _,. _. _,, _ „ „ , ~ 

opportunity to show him that he has made , The u Rev ^ R ° be " Loosemore, S.S.J.E., 

the right choice under God. ^TV^ ^ Y * ^ moi J aster y at 

Bracebridge, Ontario, conducted a mis- 

CORRECTION sion at St - Mary's Church, Asheville. The 

St. James, Hendersonville, Auxiliary's mission was conducted during the week 

UTO offering was $65.30. This will correct of Oct. 3rd to 10th, and was very well 

an omission. attended. Fr. Loosemore is well known to 

many in the diocese, having conducted two 

OCTOBER ISSUE LATE missions at Valle Crucis as well as hav- 

The HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN is ing been chaplain at Kanuga during two 

late this month due to holding all copy young peoples' conferences, 
until news and pictures of the consecra- , 

tion of Bishop Henry could be gathered. ? n , Monda y> ° ct - 4th > the missioner 
- 1 6 and the rector, the Rev. Gale D. Webbe, 

Just suppose the Lord should make blessed the new statue of St. Francis of 

some people as poor as they say they are Assisi which has been executed for the 

when asked to help finance His program. parish. 



Residence and Endowment Fund Campaign Under Way 



By action of the Executive Council and 
the Department of Finance, a campaign 
to raise $ 5 0,000 has been started in the 
Diocese. This campaign, under the lead- 
ership of Mr. V. Jordan Brown, is design- 
ed to raised $27,000 for the purchase of 
the episcopal residence and at least $23,- 
000 to be added to the Episcopal Endow- 
ment Fund. In the short time the effort 
has been under way, $17,855.70 has been 
either given or pledged. Every parish and 
mission in the Diocese is to be reached as 
quickly as possible with the informa- 
tion that the campaign has started and 
opportunity will be given to every mem- 
ber to make a contribution. 

At first it was planned to call for only 
enough to purchase the bishop's residence: 
but when it was brought to the attention 
of diocesan officials that the present En- 
dowment Fund income produces only 
$2,000 per year, it was decided to aug- 
ment this fund as much as possible. 

A house has already been purchased at 
46 Macon Avenue, and Bishop Henry and 
his family are in residence. The Trustees 
of the Diocese, who had charge of finding 
a house, were fortunate in securing valu- 
able property. The house is brick, situated 
on a spacious plot: behind it is a good 
sized log cabin that will be readily adapted 
for use as an of ice for the Hshoo. It is 
most easilv reached by following Charlotte 
Street until you see the outdoor crucifix 
at St. Mary's Church, at which point you 
turn right on to Macon Avenue. 

If the goal of $50,000 or more is 
reached, the addition to the Endowment 
Fund will augment the income so that 
there need not be such a heavy demand on 
the assessments of each parish and mission. 
However, reductions in assessments can 
come only by the Endowment Fund being 
swelled quite considerably. 



Just suppose all Christians should really 
live consistently and prove by their lives 
that they really loved the Lord. 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO 

RESIDENCE AND 
ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

Asheville, Trinity ......$5,815.00 

Asheville, St. Mary's 35.00 

Biltmore, All Souls 3,569.95 

Brevard, St. Philip's 25.00 

Boone, St. Luke's 180.00 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 300.00 

Hendersonville, St. James 250.00 

Highlands, Incarnation 30.00 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 90.00 

Marion, St. John's 100.00 

Morganton, Grace 2,612.25 

Penland, Good Shepherd 50.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis 2,500.00 

Saluda, Transfiguration 5.00 

Trvon, Holy Cross 2,100.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 143.00 

Outside 50.00 

TOTAL $17,855.70 



NEW LIGHTS DEDICATED 
AT TRINITY 

On Sunday, Oct. 10th, Bishop Henry 
dedicfd the new lights which have been 
installed in Trinity Church, Asheville. 
Bishop Henry was also the preacher at 
the service. 

The lights are a memorial to the Rt. 
Rev. lunius M. Horner, First Bishop of 
the Diocese, and were given by Mr. and 
Mrs. G. F. Butterworth of New York 
Citv. Mrs. Butterworth is the daughter of 
the late Bishop Horner. 



NEW DIRECTOR OF RELIGIOUS 
EDUCATION 

Miss Patricia Page, a graduate of Wynd- 
ham House, New York City, and for the 
past two years a Mission worker at Besse- 
mer City, N. C, has become Director of 
Religious Education in St. Luke's Parish, 
Salisbury. 



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Part of the Procession entering Trinity Church 



LUNCHEON FOLLOWS 
CONSECRATION 

Following the service of consecration, a 
luncheon honoring Bishop Henry and 
Mrs. Henry was held at the Battery 
Park Hotel. At this luncheon Bishop 
Penick was toastmaster and made haste 
to point out that his sermon text from 
Ezekiel 37 was not intended to sound like 
calling the Diocese a valley of dry bones. 
Bishop Penick pointed out that he had 



ordained Bishop Henry to the diaconate 
and priesthood, had solemnized his mar- 
riage and now had had the privilege of 
taking part in his consecration. 

At the luncheon, some of the gifts to the 
new bishop were formally presented. His 
ring was given by the men of Christ 
Church, Charlotte, the pectoral cross by 
the women of the church, his vestments 
were a gift from the clergy of the Diocese 
of North Carolina, and a vestment case 




The Laying on of Hands 



and a check were given by the Diocesan 
Auxiliary of Western North Carolina. 

A pastoral staff made of native hard- 
woods was the gift of the Young Church- 
men of the Diocese. This staff was made 
by Archdeacon Kennedy who would not 
take any pay for his work. Archdeacon 
Kennedy had said that he needed a white 
stole, having worn cut one in fifty years. 
So Bishop Henry presented the Arch- 
deacon with his own stole as a gift from 
the young people of the diocese. 



JAMES MICHAEL SALLEY 

On Thursday, June 3rd, funeral rites 
for James Michael Salley were conducted 
from St. Luke's Church, Lincolnton. The 
Rt. Rev. R. E. Gribbin, a close personal 
friend was in charge. Interment was in 
Orangeburg, S. C, Mr. Salley's native 
home. He had lived in Lincolnton where 
he was a faithful member of St. Luke's 
Church for twenty-six years. 



HOLY CROSS, TRYON, 
MAKES IMPROVEMENTS 

Extensive improvements have been 
made in the Parish House during 
the summer months and all Parish or- 
ganizations will begin their Fall work with 
up-to-date facilities. The kitchen has been 
enlarged and equipped with electric stoves, 
& refrigerator, modern cabinets, work ta- 
bles and serving table. 

The Rector's Study has a vesting room 
and lavatory added; the Choir now has a 
vesting room for men and one for women 
instead of vesting in a narrow hallway 
as heretofore. There are now five new 
rooms for Sunday School, ample and con- 
venient storage space, a new heating sys- 
tem which heats the whole Parish House, 
and everything is protected by being re- 
roofed. A fire escape from the main hall 
has also been added. 



All these things have been made possi- 
ble by the generosity and foresight of all 
members of the church who have made 
gifts from one dollar to ten thousand, ac- 
cording to their means. 



NEWS FLASHES 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the Church 
of the Transfiguration Saluda gave a 
silver tea at the Parish house in July. Miss 
Thelma Garcia, a visiting nurse from 
Polk County gave a talk, and a part of 
the offering was given to her for her 
work. 



The Woman's Auxiliary of the Church 
of the Ascension Hickory, entertained the 
members of the Church Choir with a 
party at the Rectory in July. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers o fthe Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



AUXILIARY ADVANCE 
WORK PROJECT 

Aid towards the building of a new St. 
Stephen's Mission in Morganton is the 
official Diocesan Woman's Auxiliary Ad- 
vance Work project for the All Saint's 
Day Offering in 1948. 

St. Stephen's is a mission established in 
1891 for the colored people of Morgan- 
ton. In spite of its poor location (almost 
directly behind Grace Church) it has 
ministered rather well to the negro peo- 
ple, at one time running a day school, 
sending three men into Holy Orders from 
among its communicants, one nurse, many 
school teachers, and a number of other 
Christian citizens. At present there are 22 
communicants, and an average attendance 
at services of over 15 persons. Most of the 
22 members are unusually faithful, and 
are well-trained Churchmen. 

About a year ago opportunity came to 
sell the present lot for $8,100.00 because 
of its semi-business location in town. A 
lot located at an intersection of two im- 
proved streets on the edge of the largest 
negro section of town was purchased for 
$1,500.00. It was felt that with some help 
assured us from the National Council the 
remainder of the money would be suffi- 
cient to erect a new St. Stephen's. When 
work-drawings were made, calling for a 
painted cinder block construction 41 by 
38 feet, and the contractors had bid, it 
was found that $14,164.25 was needed. 
National Council's grant is a welcome 
$3,000.00 but no more. The Trustees of 
the diocese have voted $1,800.00 from 
proceeds from the Mary E. Embury Fund. 
A request for a donation is being sent 
the American Church Building Fund, and 
the old church will bring $200 or perhaps 
a little more. St. Stephen's congregation 
is pledging itself to raise $400 and more 
if possible in order to stucco the outside 
walls. Grace Church is having a special 
offering in addition to its Auxiliary Ad- 
vance Work participation. Thus St. 



BUY 

NOW! 

US Security Bonds 



TRINITY CHURCH. Asheville. N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
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Stephen's will need about one thousand 
dollars more in order to complete the new 
church. It is hoped that the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of the Diocese will give this amount 
on All Saints' Day. Many members may 
give with the idea of a memorial for a 
departed soul. 

We believe St. Stephen's will thrive 
in its new location, close to the people 
it is meant to serve. The National Secre- 
tary for Negro Work, the Rev. Tollie 
Caution, on his visit to Morganton of more 
than a week in 1947, pointed out the 
necessity of moving to a more suitable lo- 
cation before it could be expected that 
our negro work in Morganton would real- 
ly grow. We believe this level-headed 
move, plus a new church more suitable 
to varied activities, will make possible and 
reasonable a doubling of the congregation 
within the next five years. As a Dioceasan 
mission St. Stephen's has a claim upon 
the Diocese. Our Lord Jesus Christ has 



a claim upon you to aid Him in the ex- 
tension of His Kingdom in and through 
His Church. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



The National Executive Board of the 
Woman's Auxiliary urges that every wo- 
man pause at noon day and offer Prayer 
for Peace and Divine Guidance of the Na- 
tion's leaders. 



DIOCESAN NEWS 
MORGANTON CONVOCATION— 

Patterson School this fall has the highest 
enrollment in the history of the school 
since its organization as a junior-senior 
high school. With a normal capacity of 
62, there are 64 students, coming from 
Boston to Florida along the Eastern sea- 
board, and from as far west as Gary, 
Indiana. Although there are more from 
Ncfrth Carolina than from any other 
single state, the majority of the student 
body this year is from outside North 
Carolina, with largest out-of-state dele- 
gations from Virginia, Georgia, and Flori- 
da. 

Mr. George F. Wiese, Superintendent 
of the school, will teach Bible and hold 
the Sunday morning services both for 
the student body and the neighborhood in 
Happy Valley. Assistant Superintendent, 
Mr. Jesse C. Hawkins is teaching industrial 
arts and chemistry. Mr. Alfred Whipple, 
Principal, teaches English and French. Mr. 
Grissom Miller's subjects are history, 
mathematics, and athletics; Miss Frances 
Chester teaches typing; Mr. Alvin C. 
Fowler's subjects are agriculture, forestry, 
and biology; Mr. O. E. Snyder teaches 
mathematics, Latin, and general science; 
Mr. Don Leavitt teaches history, athletics, 
and is assistant in the shop. Mrs. O. E. 
Snyder has the Junior High grades. The 
Rev. Robert B. Campbell, Rector of As- 
cension, Hickory, and the Rev. C. G. 
Leavell, Rector of Grace Church, Morgan- 
ton, come once a month on Fridays to 
celebrate Holy Communion. 

Repairs and renovation are under way 
now on Gard Hall for the expanded In- 
dustrial Arts Department with which the 
National Council is assisting. 



10 



St. James' Lenoir, is getting its Church 
School under way this fall with Mr. Mel 
F. Smith, Jr., Superintendent and around 
forty pupils enrolled. The Woman's Auxi- 
liary started off their fall meetings with a 
buffet supper at the home of Mrs. W. T. 
Carpenter, with Mrs. W. S. Downs and 
Mrs. W. G. Byerly co-hostesses. Twenty 
women attended, and plans for fall activi- 
ties were made. 

A new walnut chest, cedar-lined, de- 
signed by Mr. Mel F. Smith, Jr., was re- 
cently given St. James. It was made by 
Broyhill Factories and is being used for 
communion vessels and altar linens. 



WORK AMONG WOMEN 
ABROAD 

At the Central Council for Women's 
Church Work held in London in July, 
Mrs. Stuart, wife of the Bishop of Uganda 
said that the influence of women was 
felt in almost every section of spiritual 
life in Uganda. An instance of their 
strength was seen when the Uganda Par- 
liament passed a marriage law which 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 





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Episcopal. School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs* 3, P„ Holnes, 
15 E&remont Rd» j 
A she vi lie, N. 0* 




recognized an illegitimate heir. The 
women folk went in a body to Parliament 
House, faced their irate husbands who 
had adopted the offending statue and 
were successful in obtaining an amend- 
ment. 

— Church Times London July 30. 



JUST SUPPOSE 

Just suppose the Lord should begin 
tomorrow to make people as sick as they 
say they are on Sunday. 

Just suppose the Lord should let some 
parents look into the future and see what 
their example and lax control did for 
their children. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 
(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for GirU owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 





CANVASS 
ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
VOL. XIX NOVEMBER, 1948 NO. 6 




ERVE 

through my 

PLEDGE to 
the Church 




EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 



Box 55 Voile Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rev. M. George Henry, 
46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Every Member Canvass 

By way of introduction, may we pre- 
suppose that every reader has an ac- 
quaintance with the Every Member 
Canvass. It is now generally establish- 
ed in each parish and mission of the 
Episcopal Church, but it meets with 
varying degree of success. In some 
places it seems to be especially valuable 
and in others it does not. It is quite 
easy in a place where it does not suc- 
ceed to feel that no method of its kind 
will succeed, and frequently parishes 
and missions that could be strong are 
instead pervaded by a sense of despair 
and futility. The answer to the problem 
may be that the Canvass has neither 
been adequately understood or else the 
procedures leading up to it have been 
inadequate. By and large, it is gen- 
erally thought to be a financial effort on 
the part of churches and missions and 
its great meaning is lost sight of. It 
might be of value to indicate its meaning 
or under-lying philosophy at the very 
outset. 

It appears to us that the Every Mem- 



ber Canvass is in fact an expression of 
Christian theology. It is one of the basic 
Christian ideas that God strives to bring 
the world into a loving response to Him- 
self. The Christian doctrine of the In- 
carnation is that God came to earth, 
that He took human flesh upon Himself, 
to the end that men might unite their 
lives with Him in His great purpose in 
History. In a very real sense it might 
be said that the Every Member Canvass 
is an extension of this. It assumes that 
man does not easily or readily relate his 
life, his powers, his will and his posses- 
sions to God Himself. Thus, the Can- 
vass is an opportunity to share in God's 
purpose. It is our opportunity to relate 
what we have and what we are to the 
God who made us and sustains us. 

It is surely a reasonable plan. It 
recognizes that man dwells in a world 
of matter. It admits that spirit and 
matter are interwoven. Its great value 
lies in its insistence that God has a plan 
and a purpose for us that cannot be 
achieved by spasmodic acts of generosi- 
ty, but rather His plan calls for regular 
giving, that the program of the Church, 
not only in the local parish, but through- 
out the world, can be planned strategi- 
cally and carried out effectively. With- 
out budgets, no missionaries could be 
sent forth in our modern world. No 
Christian hospitals could do their work. 
No teachers could strive to bring insight 
and growing convictions. The Canvass 
alone makes it possible for extensive 
plans and well thought-out programs to 
be made for the life and work of the 
church. 

We now come to the place where we 
should consider the methods of the 
Canvass. It is true, I expect, that no 
one Canvass system will work effectively 
in every parish and mission. That is no 
reason, however, to suppose that it can- 
not be modified or enlarged to fit the 
circumstances of various places. There 
is, however, a minimum plan of the 
Every Member Canvass which could be 
used in every place. Let us observe 
such a minimum procedure. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



The Bishop's Message 



November and December are the months in which most of the parishes and 
missions of the diocese conduct their Every Member Canvasses. To some this 
canvass is just another one of those numerous campaigns to raise money. We do 
try to raise money, but more than that, it is a time for every member of our Church 
to take an inventory of what he or she is doing with life. 

We have our Lord's command to go unto the ends of the world, telling men of 
His act in the redemption of the world. You who have been made members of His 
Church through baptism, have been made His soldiers and servants until your life's 
end. Yet too many feel you are held down in His order to go to the ends of the 
world. You are tied down by the business that you run. You are tied down by 
the children or the housekeeping. You are tied down by your own youth, or by 
your physical infirmity, and that keeps you from striking out unto the ends of the 
world to carry His message of redemption. 

The Church has provided the means whereby you can give of your life and time 
even unto the ends of the world. It is through this Every Member Canvass. What 
you give in money goes to the ends of the world. It is spent here at home in our 
own diocesan program, and it is spent in Alaska, the Philippines, Africa, South 
America, China and Japan, the islands of the seas . . . yes, throughout the world. 
That is why you are asked to give money, so that the Church may spread through- 
out the world. 

I said above that it gave you a chance to take an inventory of what you are 
doing with your life. Money is part of your life. It is given in return for so 
many minutes of your labor. Those minutes and hours you spend in working are 
gone, and that much of your life here on this earth is gone. How then is your 
life spent? Does it all go for food and clothing? Does it all go for pleasure? Are 
you wasting your life in the way that you spend the money you receive in return 
for your hours of labor? I ask each of you to set down for yourself an inventory 
of how you spend your life. 

For convenience, let us say that you earn forty dollars a week. That repre- 
sents what someone is paying you for your life of labor. How much do you need 
to feed and clothe yourself? How much do you offer tothe god of pleasure (movies, 
vacations, football games) ? How much do you offer to the god of luxury (tobacco, 
cosmetics, furs, or any non-essential) ? Now, ask yourself how much you offer 
to God the Father Almighty who has made you and all the world, who has sent 
His Only Begotten Son into the world that through Him all men might be saved, 
who has come in the Holy Spirit to strengthen and guide all men in the Church to 
all truth. Is it only a dollar a week? That means that you give to God of yourself 
one hour. What are you doing with your life? 

Take your inventory and see how you spend your life. See what is important 
in the way you are now spending your life, and so change it that you can obey the 
command you have received from Christ Our Saviour. 

3 




Cartoogechaye Has Its Own Community Center 



This is the story of a dream that came 
true. 

Rather, it is the story of how the 
dreamer made it come true; for few 
dreams come true of themselves. 

It was a highly impractical dream; 
there was little or nothing to give it 
substance. A strictly practical man, in 
fact, would have dismissed the whole 
idea as impossible. A strictly practical 
man would have said: 

"You don't build things without 
money, lots of money; and certainly not 
in these times. A very nice dream", a 
strictly practical man would have con- 
cluded, "but it just can't happen." 

Out of a dream has grown a church, 
a community center, the beginnings of 
a clinic, a playground, and a movement 
to preserve and revive the hand skills 
that in other days here wrought beauti- 
fully and well. 

From the wrought iron latches on the 
doors to the tiny organ, St. John's church 
is unusual, and other-worldly. Finished 
in white pine paneling, it is gently lit in 
the daytime by the sunshine that filters 
through the surrounding trees and then 
through the stained glass windows, the 
gift of friends as a memorial to their 
son. At night, the illumination of elec- 
tric current is softened by shades made 
of two layers of parchment paper, be- 
tween which are ferns and herbs gath- 



ered nearby. The light sconces were 
made and contributed by E. S. Purdom, 
and Miss Frances Barr made the shades. 

The baptismal font and the bishop's 
chair came from the old St. John's. T. J. 
Johnson, Jr., grandson of the first rector 
(the Rev. J. A. Deal) made the cross, 
which originally was the processional 
cross, and the base was made by James 
Ordway, who also finished the lectern, 
the top of which is the same as that in 
the old church. The altar is from an 
abandoned church at Rainbow Springs. 
Outside, in a bell tower, is the same bell 
that summoned Cartoogechaye folk of 
a century ago to service. 

In St. John's, which was completed 
about three years ago, Mr. Morgan holds 
services twice a month. 

At Nonah Center, which is just across 
the Crawford road from Mr. Morgan's 
old home, stands a two-story building, 
combining a community center and a 
clinic; a craft house; and a children's 
playground. 

The community building-health cen- 
ter are not quite complete. (When the 
funds run out, work stops; but it always 
starts again.) 

On the first floor is the community 
center, a big room, one side centered by 
a huge fireplace, the other cut by win- 
dows that offer views of valley and 
mountains. Measuring 22 x 42, it is 




TINIEST CHURCH— This is St. 
John's Episcopal church, on Cartooge- 
chaye, which stands on the site of the 
old church. A beautiful chapel, it is per- 
haps the smallest church in America. 

quite large enough to accommodate al- 
most any community gathering Cartoo- 
gechaye will have in the foreseeable 
future. 

The final unit at the Nonah Center is 
the craft house. An old box house, 
20 x 26 feet, stood on the grounds, and 
it has been remodeled and today is in 
constant use for the teaching and prac- 
ticing of handcrafts. 

The craft work is directed by Miss 
Frances Barr, who has enthusiastic 
plans for its future. Incidental expens- 
es to date have been paid through small 
gifts to the project, but as the program 
develops, it is hoped to open a shop in 
Franklin for the sale of the craft shop 
products. Pupils, young and old, pay 
for the materials they use; otherwise, 
they are learning without cost the hand 
skills at which their ancestors were ex- 
pert. 



Mission Clergy to Receive 
Bonus Checks 

Our faithful Diocesan mission clergy 
receive exceptionally low stipends. Why? 
Because Episcopalians generally con- 
tinue to take little interest in missions, 
whether they are abroad or here at 
home. In our Diocese we have 34 or- 
ganized missions, 17 unorganized mis- 
sions, and only 18 parishes. Mission 
churches receive aid from Diocesan ap- 
propriations and from the National 
Church, while parishes are self-sustain- 
ing. But most of our missions have no 
resident priest because the Diocese can 
offer only small stipends, and also be- 
cause there is a critical shortage of clergy 
at the present time. From a small bal- 
ance in the Diocesan missionary fund, 
which has accumulated because several 
mission priests have left the Diocese 
during the past year, the Executive 
Council last week voted to give a bonus 
to the few remaining mission clergy in 
the Diocese. By earlier action the Coun- 
cil agreed to inaugurate a new plan 
whereby each mission priest will in the 
future receive a standard minimum 
stipend, which will represent a substan- 
tial increase in most missionary salaries. 
— From "The Parish Nezvs", St. Francis 
Church, Rutherfordton. 



BAPTIST PASTOR TO ENTER 
EPISCOPAL MINISTRY 

San Antonio, Tex. — Dr. Charles H. 
Heimsath, Professor of Humanities in 
Trinity University here, a distinguished 
Baptist minister, was confirmed by Bish- 
op Everett H. Jones, of the Episcopal 
Diocese of West Texas. Dr. Heimsath 
is preparing to enter the ministry of the 
Episcopal Church. He is the author of 
a number of books, among them, "The 
Genius of Public Worship," a recent Re- 
ligious Book Club selection. 



5 



Views From the Morganton Convention 

By The Rev. C. G. Leavell, Convocation News Editor 



For the Every-Member-Canvass Is- 
sue of the Highland Churchman your 
News Editor for the eastern Convoca- 
tion of the Diocese would like to indulge 
in views rather than news. What dif- 
ference will a good Canvass make to the 
Convocation of Morganton? And a 
good canvass is one that reaches every- 
one within the congregation, resulting in 
sacrificial pledging both to the local 
church and to the Church's Missionary 
Program. 

The second, third, and fourth largest 
cities in the Diocese are located in the 
Morganton Convocation. Ascension, 
Hickory, must have a good canvass this 
year if it is to get under way on its plan 
for a new Church and Parish House on 
the grand new lot secured for same. St. 
Mark's, Gastonia, has plans for moving 
into extensive and expensive new prop- 
erty. In each case local demands must 
be met while at the same time these 
larger cities aid our Diocesan and Gen- 
eral Church's missions. In the fourth 
largest city of the Diocese, Shelby, we 
have only a mission, the Redeemer. A 
good canvass here is essential for devel- 
opment of the strong parish we envision 
for the future and a building program 
on the recently-acquired lot, not to men- 
tion securing another resident clergy- 
man. 

The phenomenal financial gains at St. 
Andrew's, Bessemer City, must as least 
be maintained if the dream of a resident 
clergyman in this mill city is to be 
realized. 

ST. JOHN'S, MARION, recently 
graduated itself from any help from the 
Diocese. With the increase of mission- 
ary salaries, however, it is now due to 
raise its clergyman's salary a bit. The 
increase in the Church School also de- 
mands at least some addition to the 
present property. This wide-awake and 
growing congregation will undoubtedly 



meet its obligation and opportunities 
squarely. 

ST. FRANCIS', RUTHERFORD- 
TON, seems also to be thriving at the 
present time, with a good confirmation 
class presented this summer, active par- 
ish organizations, and the opportunity 
to become an ever-stronger force in 
Diocesan life. 

ST. JAMES', LENOIR, and St. 

Paul's, Wilkesboro, might well within 
the next year be able to cease sharing 
their Rector with each other so that a 
resident priest can be placed in the fast- 
growing Wilkesboro towns on the Yad- 
kin. The trend is that way; the canvass 
may make it possible and with it re- 
opening work at All Saints', Ronda. 

ST. LUKE'S, LINCOLTON, is obli- 
gated to an excellent canvass in support 
of the Rev. Richard John Lee who 
comes there in early December from a 
thriving larger parish in Hinsdale, Illi- 
nois. The strong little mission located 
just outside Lincolnton, Our Saviour, 
Woodside, also has this special respon- 
sibility and privilege. St. Cyprian's, 
Lincolnton, could show life and receive 
an able ministry thereby. 

ST. GABRIEL'S, RUTHERFORD- 
TON, owes it both to God and the Rec- 
tor of St. Francis' to have a good can- 
vass. In time it can and will get a resi- 
dent negro priest who can use St. 
Gabriel's as a center from which he can 
revive other negro work within our Con- 
vocation. 

ST. MARY'S, BLOWING ROCK, 

and All Saints', Linville, surely have 
something more to offer than a summer 
ministry. A good Diocesan canvass 
might make it possible for these places 
to be open the year 'round, and still im- 
port summer preachers while their regu- 
lar priest was on his vacation. 

A good canvass at St. John's, High 



Shoals, might well be a help towards 
getting a resident priest at Bessemer 
City who would work both places and 
relieve the Rector at Gastonia to con- 
centrate on the work in that Southeast- 
ern metropolis of the Diocese. 

An extra good Diocesan canvass 
might make available funds for a Chap- 
lain long talked of for Patterson School 
and the Chapel of Rest. Some financial 
aid too might go to our under-paid Rec- 
tor of Appalachian School, Penland, in 
charge of the Good Shepherd Mission 
there. 

Another resident priest at St. Luke's, 
Boone, is a great need to be met inas- 
much as he would serve the people in 
an active mountain town and also stu- 
dents from various parts of the State at 
Appalachian State Teachers' College. 
His rural ministry would also reach out 
to St. Mary's, Beaver Creek, and the 
people of Jefferson. 

The ministry at Valle Crucis, where 
for years the Church has been doing an 
outstanding piece of rural work, simply 
cannot go on without a Diocesan can- 
vass. Although Holy Cross Mission 
there has assumed more and more of its 
priest's salary, the work is such as will 
probably always demand some Diocesan 
aid where the Diocese can in turn take 
pride in a grand work it is helping in 
what is really the open country. 

Beyond places mentioned, a most ex- 
cellent canvass plus available clergy 
would make possible expansion of the 
Church in such places as Valdese, New- 
ton-Conover, Cherryville, King's Moun- 
tain, Mt. Holly, and Old Fort. Certain 
it is that we have in our Convocation 
(and we hear similar things to the West 
of us) a glorious opportunity for the 
mission of the Church, the call of our 
Lord to evangelization, and to strength- 
en our living witness to Him. 



Annual Blast by a Bishop 

In his diocesan paper, Bishop Stephen 
F. Bayne unburdens his soul in this 
fashion: "If you have any respect for 
the Bishop's blood pressure, PLEASE 
do not use the word 'Reverend' as a 
title. It is wrong. It is sinful. It is 
against Emily Post. It is ungrammati- 
cal. It is everything that is loathsome 
and horrible. There. 'Reverend' is an 
adjective, like 'Honorable' which is used 
to modify a noun — as 'The Reverend 
Mr. Brown,' or 'The Reverend John 
Brown.' It is NOT a title. It is AL- 
WAYS prefixed by 'the.' It is NEVER 
used with the last name alone. Arch- 
bishops are 'The Most Reverend; — 
that includes Bishop Sherrill in our 
books — Bishops are 'The Right Rev- 
erend,' Deans are 'The Very Reverend,' 
Archdeacons are 'The Venerable,' Parish 
priests — those peasants — are 'The Rev- 
erend.' End of annual blast on that 
subject." 



LINCOLNTON TO GET NEW 
RECTOR 

The Rev. Richard H. Lee has accept- 
ed the rectorship and will take up his 
new work at St. Luke's, Lincolnton, on 
December 5th. The Rev. Mr. Lee comes 
to the parish from Hinsdale, Illinois, 
where he has been the rector of a very 
successful parish for the past twenty- 
five years. In addition to the work at 
St. Luke's, Mr. Lee will also have charge 
of the rather extensive field around Lin- 
colnton that ministers to white and col- 
ored rural congregations. 

At the time the announcement was 
made of Mr. Lee's acceptance, it was 
also announced that the fruits of Mrs. 
J. M. Salley's labors have been realized 
with the installation of new carpet for 
the church. Some time ago Mrs. Salley 
began to work for money for new car- 
peting. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

By Lanthe Rush Campbell 



A PRAYER 

Found in Chester Cathedral, England, 
Dated 1770 

Give me a good digestion, Lord, and 
also something to digest. Give me a 
healthy body, Lord, with sense to keep 
it at its best. Give me a healthy mind, 
good Lord, to keep the good and pure 
in sight; which seeing sin, is not appall- 
ed, but finds a way to set it right. Give 
me a mind that is not bored, that does 
not whimper, whine or sigh; don't let 
me worry overmuch about the fussy 
thing called I. Give me a sense of 
humor, Lord: give me the grace to see 
a joke; to get some happiness from life 
and pass it on to other folk. Amen. 



The Fall Executive Board meeting of 
the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese 
met September 20th at Patterson School. 
The Rt. Rev. George Henry was cele- 
brant at the Holv Communion, in the 
School Chapel. The Board meeting was 
held at the Wiese home, with Miss Lucy 
Fletcher presiding. It was decided at 
the meeting to bring Miss Avis Harvey 
of the National Council to the Diocese 
in November for a series of work shop 
meetings to be held in each district. You 
are urged to attend your district meet- 
ing. Mrs. Wiese assisted, by her daugh- 
ters, served a delicious lunch. 



SYNOD 

Miss Lucy Fletcher, Mrs. William T. 
Capers, Mrs. Viola Lenoir, Mrs. Thomas 
O. Wright, and Mrs. Robert B. Camp- 
bell, delegates, and Mrs. A. B. Stoney, 
(visitor), represented you at the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary in the Province of Sewa- 
nee, which met in Augusta, Georgia, 
October 5, 6, 7. Enthusiastic reports 



were given about Woman's work in the 
Province, and your prayers are request- 
ed for the furtherance of Christ's work. 



WON'T YOU? 

1. Attend every Auxiliary meeting. 

2. Add something to the meeting. 

3. Help with the program when ask- 



>&. 



4. Remember Every Member Can- 



vass. 



5. Help with the Canvass if you are 
needed. 

6. Encourage every woman in your 
Parish to give to U.T.O. 



PROGRAM 

China and The Prayer Book will be 
our new study. The study manual on 
China is "China — Twilight or Dawn" 
by Dr. Frank Rice. (Friendship Press. 
Price #1.50, paper binding 90^). 

Dr. Price has served in China as a 
misisonary of the Presbyterian Church 
U.S.A. since 1923. The book has been 
prepared as a study book. Many inter- 
esting ways of presenting it, such as 
panel discussions, forum discussions, and 
illustrative charts, can be used to make 
your China discussions interesting. Re- 
member a good program means a live 
auxiliary. 



PLEASE! 

This is your page. Do you have any 
suggestions for it? Let us know what 
would help you most, and if your 
auxiliary has a good idea to pass on, we 
will publish it here. 



Lord, revive thy Church, beginning 
with me. 




So young when elected in November, 1947, that his consecration 
had to be delayed until after May 6, 1948, when he became thirty 
years old, the Rt. Rev. Wm. J. Gordon was made Bishop of Alaska 
on May 18. Thirty is the lowest legal age for a bishop in the Epis- 
copal Church. With Mrs. Gordon, daughter Shirley, and a still 
younger son, William, Jr., not in the picture, Bishop Gordon has 
returned to Alaska to start his new work. At the time when the 
House of Bishops was electing him, he was out on a trip by dog- 
sled and was spending that particular night in a deserted igloo with 
his tent up for an added protection from the cold wind. He was 
priest in charge of St. Thomas Mission at Point Hope, a rrmote 
Eskimo settlement on l..e Arctic Coast of North America. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6 3 /s". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH. Asheville. N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A.M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A.M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 

(Continued from Page 2) 

It will call for at least two things. The 
training of a few individuals for the pur- 
pose of presenting the budget of the 
parish or mission, the Diocese and the 
general church. We say this is true, 
since it does not seem right that the min- 
ister alone should be responsible for the 
raising of the budget. Thus, the small- 
est parish would need two men to meet 
with others connected with the parish 
or mission, and present to them the 
budgetary needs. This means that the 
Priest-in-charge or Rector is under an 
obligation to meet with those workers 
and to help them prepare for the ques- 
tions that may be asked. A second pro- 
cedure in the minimum Every Member 
Canvass would be the mailing of the 
Canvass mailing pieces. The mailing 



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pieces for the National Church and the 
Diocese are prepared, but the mailing 
piece for the local parish or mission 
must be taken care of by the parish or 
mission itself. The smallest group, I 
believe, would have a typewriter avail- 
able and a few typewritten copies could 
be mailed to the individuals in that par- 
ish or mission. Even moderate sized 
parishes and missions frequently have 
access to a mimeograph, which simpli- 
fies the work. The parish or mission 
mailing piece should set forth the budget 
rather concisely and clearly and it would 
seem out of place to suggest that a some- 
what larger budget should be made from 
year to year. Where there is spiritual 
growth it appears to us that there will 
be some incentive to sacrifice even where 
this world's goods are not overly-abun- 
dant. These mailing pieces should be 
mailed over a period of perhaps two 
weeks proceeding the actual time of the 
Canvass. 

To summarize: A minimum Canvass 
would call for some training of workers, 
a planned budget and the use of pub- 
licity. 

Now, a word about a maximum pro- 
cedure. Obviously there is no end to 
which this might go. It would involve 
a great deal of training for a very con- 
siderable group of workers. It would 
necessitate a careful outline of date con- 
trols (so as not to conflict with other 
drives or activities). It would necessi- 
tate a large organizational setup, with 
a colonel, captains and workers. It 
would call for releases through news- 
papers and parish bulletins. Talks by 
laymen to the congregation would be 
indicated. Zoning systems would have 
to be worked out to facilitate the actual 
calls being made by the workers. Per- 
iodic check-ups and reports would have 
to be made by the Canvass groups. Ar- 
rangements for printing and layouts for 
the parish pieces would have to be given 
a great deal of attention. Very system- 
atic reports would have to be given and 
careful check kept on all records ana 
information achieved through the Can- 
vass. 



10 



This is not to say that a Canvass in 
a large parish is more important than 
it is in a small parish. But there are 
of necessity a great many more details 
involved in it and the failure to attend 
to all the details could easily mean a 
critical situation. To put it briefly: in 
a large parish, calling for a maximum 
procedure, there will be found perhaps 
a large number of good workers, but, 
proportionately, a large number of peo- 
ple who may fail to do their work. 

In conclusion, may we say that the 
Every Member Canvass, wherever it is 
conducted, whether it be in a large par- 
ish or the smallest mission, whether it 
be with a minimum procedure or an ex- 
tremely involved procedure, is, at lea-st, 
an opportunity to share in the creative 
purpose of God. If sin be man's oppo- 
sition to God's purpose and if it be the 
unwillingness to share in His creative 
plan, it appears to us that a failure to 
conduct a Canvass in these times does 
very easily border upon sin against God. 
John W. Tuton, Chairman, 
Department of Promotion. 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

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Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
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The Patterson School 




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Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

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Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs. Eo"bert Qst: 



■41 




DISTRICT VESTRY MEETINGS 
INAUGURATED 

Bishop Henry has inaugurated a plan 
whereby vestries and mission committees 
in several districts of the diocese are 
meeting jointly to consider plans for the 
extending the work of the diocese. Sev- 
eral of these meetings have already been 
held. The districts in which these meet- 
ings are held are smaller than the area 
of the two Convocations, thus making 
it more possible for people to attend 
without driving great distances. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 
(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville. N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — -Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



Cjjurdjtnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XIX 



DECEMBER, 1948 



NO. 7 




St. Francis of Assist, Cherokee Indian Reservation 



Si;? figfylanb 
OUjurrlfman 

Box 55 Voile Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March i, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rev. M. George Henry, 
46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Diocesan-Aided Schools 

The title of this editorial might lead 
the reader astray into thinking that there 
are schools in the diocese which are 
helped in great degree from Diocesan 
funds. Such does not seem to be the 
case. Two of them, Patterson and Ap- 
palachian, both within our borders and 
owned by the Diocese, receive 200 dol- 
lars a year from the Budget. The Uni- 
versity of the South at Sewanee is not 
listed to receive any help from the 1949 
Budget, and St. Mary's School is to be 
helped by only 200 dollars. 

The main effort of this School Issue 
is to point up the need for the church- 
men of the Diocese to make an extra 
effort in giving to support these four 
Church institutions. Because there is 
inadequate provision in the Budget it 
becomes the responsibility of the indi- 
vidual parishes and missions, through 
their members, to make up a fund which 
will be more than a token of our esteem. 

The Executive Councli, with its inter- 
ested departments, realizes all too well 
that another Sunday especially set aside 



for a special offering comes at a most 
inopportune time, but there seemed no 
other time if there was to be an offering 
made in 1948. It seems to be a hanging 
offense in the Episcopal Church to sug- 
gest that the offerings of Easter or 
Christmas be used for a Special Outside 
Purpose. Sad to relate, the offerings of 
these high holy days must be used to 
balance the parish budget. 

We call your attention to the four 
articles on our schools printed in this 
issue as well as to Bishop Henry's plea. 
We join with him in asking every 
churchman in the Diocese to respond to 
the pressing needs of our own educa- 
tional institutoins. 



Christmas 1948 

With this December issue we close 
our editorial year, freed for a space from 
the chain that doesn't let us run very 
loose from one 20th of the month to the 
next. It has been an eventful year. A 
special convention for the election of a 
bishop had to be covered, and hard upon 
that we had to print the news of Dr. 
Tucker's declination. Then came the 
May Convention when Bishop Henry 
was elected, followed by the anxious 
days of waiting to hear of his accept- 
ance. We must have overdrawn our 
budget in the desperate attempt to get 
our own picture inserted in the Con- 
secration Issue and then set to work to 
fulfill the purpose of this journal by 
promoting the Every Member Canvass 
to the end that this Diocese might be 
given the means to do God's work in 
Western North Carolina. It has been 
a hectic year, but we have strength 
enough to wish everyone a Blessed and 
Merry Christmas. 



OUR COVER 

The beautiful little church pictured 
on the cover is that of St. Francis of 
Assisi, situated on the Cherokee Reser- 
vation. We wish space allowed printing 
another picture which shows how well 
situated this chapel is, high on a hillside 
overlooking the Reservation. 



The Bishop's Page 



The First Sunday in December has been designated by the Department of 
Christian Education of the Diocese of Western North Carolina as a Sunday on 
which every congregation would receive an offering for the support of the Church 
owned Schools of this Diocese. There are four such schools: Appalachian School, 
at Penland; Patterson School, at Legerwood; St. Mary's School, at Raleigh; and 
The University of the South, at Sewanee, Tennessee. The first two of these are 
owned solely by this Diocese. St. Mary's School in Raleigh is owned by the five 
Dioceses of the Carolinas. The University of the South is owned by the fifteen 
Dioceses of the Province of Sewanee. 

To own a school involves certain responsibilities. There is the responsibility 
of seeing that the School is known so that there will be a constant group of students 
seeking admission. There is a second responsibility; to see that as a Church School 
it keeps up the highest standards, and gives a truly Christian education. The third 
responsibility that is involved is the financial support necessary to enable the school 
to operate. 

I would like for every member of the Diocese of Western North Carolina to 
undertake those three responsibilities. How many of you have actually visited 
these schools owned and operated by the Church? You own it; do you know any- 
thing about it. ? Are you shirking your responsibility when you don't even know 
about the schools you own? How can you tell others about your schools when you 
have not visited them, nor investigated the opportunities and problems of each of 
these schools? 

As a Church member and therefore an owner of the four schools, it is your 
responsibility to see that these schools remain truly Christian in their emphasis. 
Knowledge, you can receive at any school, but Christian Wisdom is knowledge 
interpreted, and related, evaluated and intergrated into a life in the church. This 
is the aim of Christian Education, and it is the aim of our Schools. Help keep 
it that way. 

The Third Responsibility of supporting these schools has been somewhat 
neglected by the communicants of this Diocese as a whole. There are token gifts 
to our schools through our Diocesan Budget, but they are so small that they are 
only tokens. There are individuals who have supported our schools most liberally, 
but all of us are being given an opportunity to contribute to the financial support 
of our schools on the First Sunday in December. I hope that you will take advan- 
tage of this opportunity to meet one of your responsibilities, and that in the future 
you will strive more diligently to meet the other two responsibilities I have men- 
tioned. 



A Responsibility Within Our Borders 




Appalachian School, Penland 



The things that are so common place 
and self-evident are more likely the 
things we are apt to overlook unless we 
continually remind ourselves of them. 
In a similar manner the works of the 
Church and particularly of our own 
Diocese, especially if out of our imme- 
diate sight. For this reason the schools 
of the Diocese ought to have a particular 
place in our thinking, for as our motto 
is concerning the "household" of God 
one of the schools, Appalachian School, 
could well be considered as the nursery 
of the diocese. Your interest at large 
in us, ought to be more than simply 
philanthropic (sic, as recipients of your 
financial support) but of a communal 
nature to fulfill the intentions of the 
founder, Bishop Horner. The individual 
Sponsor at the Baptism of a child prom- 
ises "to take heed that this Child learn 
... all things which a Christian ought 
to know ..." and "take heed that this 
Child is sufficiently instructed" so it is a 
promise of the Diocese, which means 
each one of us assumes the obligation so 
that it can be carried out collectively. 
If we are to provide the proper vehicle 
it is a matter for your continued interest 
and prayers. 

Since the School was first taken under 
the egis of the Church in 1910 the posi- 
tion of child in the world continues to 



be precarious and the need for a place 
for a child whose normal way of life has 
been interrupted is provided. The school 
has to achieve a threefold purpose of 
providing home, church and education 
simulating as near as possible the "full 
life" each one of us expects and to which 
he has a right, and which privilege the 
Church acknowledges in receiving a 
child into its fellowship. By taking 
young children, from age six to twelve 
for the first six grades of grammar 
school, a well ordered routine of activi- 
ties, study, play, manual work and spir- 
itual exercises a child is enabled to de- 
velop his abilities and share his respon- 
sibilities to the fullest extent under the 
Church's guidance. 

In the way the Diocese makes it pos- 
sible for young children from the sea- 
board states from Maryland to Florida 
to come to us in part we fulfill our obli- 
gation for the "advancement of true 
religion and useful learning" to which 
it is committed, and the schools are the 
"special means the Church provides to 
help you do all these things" if not in 
person, at least through its workers on 
the staff who try to be an expression of 
your interest. In a sense, Appalachian 
School meets a need not met by other 
(Continued on Page 16) 



Patterson School Serves The Church 




Work becomes play and play work in 
Happy Valley. 

The Patterson School for Boys is a 
Church school owned and operated by 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
and as such dedicated to the service of 
Our Lord and His Church. Through 
the nearly forty years of its existence, 
it has been the privilege of its personnel 
to serve the Church through service to 
youth and the development of Christian 
manhood. 

The chapel is the visible embodiment 
of our aim to lead students into a right 
relationship with God and is the center 
from which radiates all that is best in 
our school life. Though we do not yet 
have a resident chaplain, the regular 
services of the Church provide oppor- 
tunity for spiritual growth. The Rev. 
Boston M. Lackey of Lenoir, the Rev. 
Charles G. Leavell of Morganton, and 
the Rev. Robert B. Campbell of Hickory 
alternate in giving us a service of the 
Holy Communion and sermon on each 
Friday morning. The Rev. Hugh A. 
Dobbin, retired headmaster, celebrates 
the Holy Communion on the first Sun- 
day of each month. An average of 40 
persons partake of the sacrament each 
week. Mr. George F. Wiese, superin- 
tendent, conducts a service of Morning 
Prayer with sermon on the other Sunday 
mornings of each month. He or Mr. 
Whipple, principal, leads the school in 
morning devotions in the chapel on each 



school day before classes begin. All 
students attend Church School on Sun- 
day mornings and Bible classes for high 
school students are held through the 
week. 

The religious observances in the 
school do not constitute the only means 
of bringing the truths of our Christian 
faith to bear upon everyday living. Here 
religion is not a separate department 
but an integral part of the life of the 
school family. Patterson School serves 
the Church through its classroom work 
and activities. The curriculum has been 
expanded to include, beside a full and 
well rounded practical and theoretical 
junior and senior high school courses, 
classes in agriculture, forestry, industrial 
arts, typing, and Bible. The scholastic 
standards are high and emphasis is 
placed on teaching the boy how to study 
and to make the best use of every ability 
he possesses. Small classes make it pos- 
sible for teachers to study the needs of 
each individual and offer help to over- 
come special difficulties. 

Patterson School serves the Church 
through its work program. The large 
fertile farm, up-to-date farm machinery, 
the pure-bred dairy herd, the school 
forest, power plant, and ever-present 
building projects, offer varied opportuni- 
ties for developing body and mind and 




Hilliard Seigler of 
candles before ser.mee 
School. 



Asheville lights 
at Patterson 



such components of good citizenship as 
respect for honest work and unselfish 
service, cooperation, responsibility and 
self-discipline. On the farm the boys 
see practiced the type of agriculture 
which is self-supporting. Modern meth- 
ods are constantly superseding outworn 
ones. The income from the farm en- 
ables us to receive boys at present low 
rates and to provide part scholarships 
for worthy ambitious students as needed 
while the boys' own work enables them 
to feel that they are doing their share 
to pay their way as well as learning to 
help themselves in the future. Boys not 
interested in farming find the same 
values in their work on the campus, in 
the dormitories, the dining room, kit- 
chen, or furnace room. 

Patterson School serves the Church 
on the athletic field. Here, as elsewhere, 
the building of character goes hand in 
hand with "playing the game" and no- 
where else are achievements or failures 
in its development more quickly shown 
up. Basketball and baseball have been 
favorite sports for years past. This year 
the boys have enthusiastically embraced 
six-man football and are reaping the 
benefits which persevering effort and 
self-sacrifice for the good of the whole 
automatically bring. At the same time 
younger members of the student body 
are showing remarkable ingenuity in 
putting on a series of original entertain- 
ments on Saturday nights, featuring 
plays, radio programs, and an original 
ballet in costume, which have succeeded 
in pleasing both adult friends and their 
own more critical contemporaries. 

This year Patterson School opened 
with and has maintained a capacity en- 
rollment of 64 boarding and two day 
students. They come from places as far 
apart as Boston and Miami, and as Cali- 
fornia and the District of Columbia, with 
the majority from North Carolina. 

Each year finds us with new and im- 
proved equipment and facilities. Each 
year also brings the necessity for repairs 
and replacements in order to maintain 
our physical plant and our capacity for 
service. This fall it was necessary to 




Boys help build the new Gymnasium 



replace the old furnace in Palmyra Hall, 
to have the bathrooms renovated, new 
plumbing installed, and some painting 
done. The greatest change in an exist- 
ing building took place in Gard Hall. A 
gift of $12,700 from the National Coun- 
cil and the Woman's Auxiliary has been 
used to renovate this building to house 
an improved Vocational Arts Depart- 
ment. The large porch has been re- 
moved, walls, windows, and partitions 
changed, a heating system for the entire 
building installed, new linoleum and 
paint added where needed. Welders and 
other equipment have been added to the 
shop. It was understood that money 
for the additional equipment needed for 
the course would be raised locally in 
consideration of the gift from the Na- 
tional Church. 

Work has gone forward on the gym- 
nasium as fast as contributions have 
permitted. Side walls were completed 
early in the summer and the boys are 
now engaged in helping the carpenters 
build and place the rafters which will 
support the roof. We are most anxious 
to have the building covered before 
winter weather sets in so that the boys 
may practice on the sub-floor and so that 
the inside lumber may be protected from 
the elements. Boys need a gymnasium 
and through it, too, the school will serve 
the Church. 

We are in real need of one or more 

homes for faculty members and for a 

resident chaplain. The lack of living 

accommodations for married faculty 

(Continued on Page 12) 



6 



Facts About Sewanee, The University of The South 



The University of the South is owned 
by twenty-two Southern dioceses of the 
Episcopal Church, of which the Diocese 
of Western Xorth Carolina is one. 

Sewanee was founded in 1857, opened 
in 1868. 

In 1947. the University of the South 
celebrated the 90th anniversary of its 
founding. 

The L niversity of the South is situated 
in a forested tract of almost 10.000 acres 
on the crest of the Cumberland Plateau. 

Sewanee is 2.000 feet above the sea. 
about the same altitude as Lookout 
Mountain, fifty miles away. 

More than 500 Episcopal priests liv- 
ing today received training at Sewanee, 
the University of the South. 

Thirty Episcopal Bishops in America 
have been students at Sewanee. 

Sewanee's largest enrollment was 
reached in 1948 with 520 students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, 47 in the 
School of Theology, and 230 in the 
Sewanee Military Academy. 

One of the finest at any small univer- 
sity in the South, the Library at Sewanee 
contains 59.000 bound volumes. 

The Hospital at Sewanee operates the 
largest charity clinic between Nashville 
and Chattanooga. Annually, thousands 
of mountain people are treated by its 
staff of five doctors. 

The L niversity of the South is noted 
for the intense loyalty of its students to 
the traditions and ideals of Sewanee. 

The Lniversity of the South adheres 
to the basic function of the college of 
liberal arts; the training of a man in 
self - master}-, social consciousness, 
aesthetic appreciation, intellectual in- 
tegrity, and in Christian virtue. 

Sewanee maintains a faculty of char- 
acter and distinction, in intimate contact 



r ?^ HP* | 



8JSH0J FRANK-4-<Jdti> c l*i 

The Rt. Rev. Frank A. ]uhan, Bishop 
of Florida, zcho has been Chancellor of 
the University of the South since 1945. 
The Chancellor is always one of the 
bishops of the tzventy-one owning dio- 
ceses. 

with a small, carefully selected group of 
students. 

At Sewanee this year, students in the 
college of arts and sciences number 546. 
In the School of Theology, the only 
Episcopal seminary in the country which 
does not charge tuition, are 57 students, 
and the Sewanee Military Academy en- 
rollment is 240, an all-time high for each 
of the separate schools in the University 
of the South. The faculties are the fin- 
est ever assembled at Sewanee; with a 
record staff of six physicians, the Univer- 
sity Hospital is administering to more 
area cases than ever before; and the 
Lniversity Press has published its first 
full-length volume in several decades, 
Hooker's Polity, by Dr. John Sedberry 
Marshall. 

Although the death of Vice-Chancel- 
lor Alexander Guerry was a tragic loss 



? 




St. Luke's Hall has been the college home of over 500 Episcopal 
ministers. Built in 1877 this building is a distinguished and beau- 
tiful memorial given by Mrs. Charlotte Morris Manigault in mem- 
ory of her father. There is a bedroom for each student and a 
private living room with fire place for each two students. 



to Sewanee, his acute foresight and plan- 
ning have enabled the mountain-top 
University to remain strong and pro- 
gressive. 

The popular Sewanee Summer Train- 
ing School will reopen in the summer of 
1949 for the first time since 1942, accord- 
ing to an announcement by the Rev. 
Girault M. Jones of New Orleans, chair- 
man of the executive committee. Op- 
erated by a joint board of the Depart- 
ment of Christian Education of the Pro- 
vince and of the University of the South, 
the co-educational two-weeks training 
program is one of the high spots in sum- 
mer activity of the Sewanee Province. 

Founded in 1910 by the late Rev. 
Gardiner Tucker, D. D., one of the great 
advocates fo Christian training of lay 
leaders, the school prospered for thirty- 
two years until it was forced to close by 
the accelerated wartime training pro- 
gram at Sewanee, which took all avail- 
able facilities of the University. The 
resumption of the school is in response 
to repeated requests from sponsoring 



church organizations. 

"The one opportunity of lay people 
to meet for systematic training in the 
techniques of Christian leadership", is 
the description of the training school 
offered by the Rev. Mr. Jones. Other 
executive members of the committee are 
Miss Ellen Correll, registrar-treasurer, 
of Memphis; Henry M. Gass, acting 
Vice-Chancellor of the University; and 
Charles E. Thomas, director of admis- 
sions at Sewanee. The remaining com- 
mittee members are the Rt. Rev. Thom- 
as N. Carruthers, Bishop of South Caro- 
lina; the Rt. Rev. John Moore Walker, 
Bishop of Atlanta; the Rev. Clarence 
R. Haden, Jr., of Durham, North Caro- 
lina; the Rev. Mortimer Glover of Wil- 
mington, North Carolina; the Rev. John 
Turner of Birmingham, Alabama; the 
Rev. Edgar L. Pennington of Mobile, 
Alabama; Mrs. Randall Chase of San- 
ford, Florida; Mrs. John Morson of 
Greenville, Mississippi; and the direc- 
tor, ex-officio, who has not yet been ap- 
pointed. 



8 



St. Mary's School, Raleigh, Looks To Us For Support 



On the suggestion of Bishop Levi Sil- 
liman Ives, the Rev. Dr. Albert Smedes 
came down from the Diocese of New 
York in 1842 and opened a school for 
girls in Raleigh, N. C. This school was 
named Saint Mary's, and, as Dr. Smedes 
wrote in an account of the school: 
"There is significance in its name . . . 
Its title, 'Saint Mary's,' designates it as 
an institution of the Church, a school 
of Christ, whose chief desire and care 
are to instill into the minds of its pupils 
the wisdom that is from above, and to 
form in them habits of obedience, in- 
dustry and piety that will make them 
blessed and a blessing here and meet 
for the inheritance of Saints in light 
hereafter." Thus, although Saint Mary's 
was established as a privately owned 
school, from the very beginning it has 
received the approval and the patronage 
of the Church and has placed an em- 
phasis on spiritual training. 

Also from the beginning, Saint Mary's 
has aspired to a very high standard of 
learning and has practised a very broad 
concept of education. Dr. Smedes de- 
fined education to his students as "the 
drawing out, the developing, the training 
of all your powers of body, mind and 
heart, that you may become strong, and 
intelligent, and good, and wise, and thus 
be fitted for usefulness and happiness in 
this life, and for immortal happiness in 
the life to come." His aim was to inspire 
in them the love of knowledge and a 
sense of the responsibility entailed in 
the privilege of education. They were 
taught in such a way that they in turn 
might be teachers, either vocationally 
or to the children in their homes. 

There has been not change in this con- 
cept of education as Saint Mary's has 
progressed through the years. While 
many courses have been added to the 
curriculum and great improvements and 
additions to the equipment, the ideal has 
remained the same. 

When Saint Mary's first opened its 
doors, there was no separate chapel 



building. The first floor of East Rock, 
now used as offices for the staff, was 
furnished with pews and an upright or- 
gan and all services were conducted 
there. In the summer of 1855 the con- 
struction of the original chapel was be- 
gun according to a plan, as Dr. Smedes 
stated in his report to the Diocesan Con- 
vention of 1856, "of such expressive tho 
simple architecture, that it will be a con- 
stant witness to the religious character 
and object of the school, and add much 
to the interest and efficiency of the ser- 
vices." Bishop Atkinson, who followed 
Bishop Ives in the Diocese of North 
Carolina, was greatly impressed with 
the beauty and functional quality of the 
chapel. After preaching his first sermon 
there and confirming sixteen persons 
connected with the school, he reported 
to the Diocesan Convention of 1858: 
"I need scarcely repeat here my convic- 
tion of the exceeding value of the ser- 
vices which has been rendered to the 
cause of Christian education, and indeed 
to all the best interests of society, not 
only in this state, but through a large 
portion of the South by this Institution." 
With the help of the alumnae the chapel 
was rebuilt and enlarged in 1905. 

The chapel is indeed the heart of Saint 
Mary's. There, the school year opens 
with an initial chapel service and there 
in closes with a final benediction. 
Throughout the year the student body 
gathers in the chapel three times during 
the week and twice on Sundays. The 
quiet surroundings, the beauty of the 
ritual, and the fellowship of audible par- 
ticipation in the service — all create a 
lasting influence in the hearts of the girls 
and remain their constant inspiration 
throughout life. 

Strong and active church workers 
have come out of Saint Mary's. Many 
of the students attending Saint Mary's 
have been reared with church affiliations 
other than Episcopalian. Yet, each 
spring a large number of these girls are 
confirmed into the Episcopal Church, 



and when they return to their homes be- 
come leaders and missionaries in their 
communities. 

In 1896, Dr. Bennett Smedes, who 
had taken over the management of Saint 
Mary's on his father's death, because 
of ill health and financial difficulties 
brought on by years of depression, re- 
quested that the Diocesan Convention 
take charge of Saint Mary's. The con- 
vention acceded to his request. Through 
a charter granted by the Legislature on 
March 2, 1897, trustees elected from the 
Diocesses of North and East Carolina 
and the jurisdiction of Asheville were 
incorporated; by an amendment to the 
act of January 10, 1899, additional 
trustees from the Diocese of South Caro- 
lina were elected. Thus, Saint Mary's 
became the Diocesan School of North 
and South Carolina. 

Under Church jurisdiction Saint 
Mary's has moved steadily forward in 
the field of education, adding through 
the years extra courses and higher class- 
es to its curriculum. In 1927 under Dr. 
Way's administration Saint Mary's was 
accredited as a junior college by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. Today Saint Mary's 
is the largest Episcopal Church School 
for girls in the country and is a member 
in good standing of the American Asso- 
ciation of Junior Colleges. 

With a faculty of thirty members. 
Saint Mary's offers a standard liberal 
arts curriculum, and, in addition, courses 
in Bible, speech, theatre arts, modern 
dance, fine art and commercial art, 
piano, violin, organ, voice, home econo- 
mics, and a full commercial course. Fol- 
lowing the retirement of Mrs. Ernest 
Cruikshank in 1946, Dr. Richard G. 
Stone, formerly professor of economics 
and sociology at Converse College, be- 
came president of the school. 

Western North Carolina is represent- 
ed on the Board of Trustees by the 
Bishop of the diocese as ex officio offi- 
cer and by four trustees. Mrs. A. B. 
Stoney of Morganton, an alumna, and 
Mrs. C. C. Dawson of Cramerton, the 



mother of two graduates and one mem- 
ber of the present student body, are 
actively interested in the affairs of the 
school. Mrs. Dawson has served with 
distinction as a member of the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. 
The Rev. G. Mark Jenkins of Fletcher, 
and the Rev. B. M. Lackey of Lenoir, 
are faithful members of the Board and 
are active in their support of the school. 

Saint Mary's has experienced a great 
many improvements under Church 
ownership. But there is always need 
for repair and further improvements to 
a school as old and yet as progressive 
as Saint Mary's is today. In order to 
continue her fine services the school will 
have to add new buildings and facilities 
and afford higher salaries to maintain 
the excellence of her teaching staff. To 
do this Saint Mary's must depend as 
always on the support of her alumnae 
and of the Church. 



ST. JOHN'S, MARION 

On Sunday, November 7th, Bishop 
Henry made his first visitation to St. 
John's Parish, was the celebrant of the 
Holy Eucharist at eight and eleven 
o'clock, and preached at the latter ser- 
vice. Fie talked to the children of the 
Sunday School and visited each class. 
In the evening an informal reception for 
him was held at the Rectory. On Mon- 
day afternoon he met with the Vestry. 

Sunday, November 14th, was the day 
of the annual parish canvass. The mem- 
bers of the Vestry were assisted by mem- 
bers of the Woman's Auxiliary. By late 
afternoon, with a few exceptions, all the 
pledges were in. The budget, which is 
the largest in the history of the Parish, 
was over-subscribed. It is an annual 
event in the Parish, and one which the 
community looks forward to, the spa- 
ghetti supper given by the Woman's 
Auxiliary, which took place on Novem- 
ber 18th in the Community Building. 
Two hundred tickets at $1.25 each, were 
sold. It was hard work but there were 
many willing hands and a good profit 
was made. 



10 



UNITED THANK OFFERING, FALL 1948 

First District 

Asheville, Trinity $ 357.11 

Asheville, Grace Mission 35.00 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel — Haw Creek 6.50 

Asheville, St. Luke's Chunn's Cove 10.00 

Asheville, Church of the Redeemer 16.00 

Biltmore, All Souls 181.50 

Black Mountain, St. James 55.00 

Canton, St. Andrews 24.19 

Fletcher, Calvary 73.00 

Franklin, St. Agnes 28.59 

Highlands, Incarnation 18.65 

Murphy, Messiah 12.00 

Waynesville, Grace 39.45 

Second District 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration $ 21.24 

Brevard, St. Philips Woman's Auxiliary 55.50 

Brevard, St. Anne's Guild 20.55 

Edneyville, St. Paul's 8.50 

Hendersonville, St. James 40.94 

Tryon, Holy Cross 355.69 

Third District 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's $ 9.00 

Boone, St. Luke's 4.67 

Hickory, Ascension 128.26 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 14.38 

Lenoir, St. James 47.50 

Marion, St. John's 35.05 

Morganton, Grace 124.00 

Morganton, St. Mary's 7.15 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 26.13 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 17.50 

Fourth District 

Gastonia, St. Mark's $ 103.35 

High Shoals, St. John's 8.00 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 20.00 

Lincolnton, Church of Our Savior, Woodside 8.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis 108.34 

Shelby, Church of the Redeemer 26.60 

Fifth District 

Asheville, St. Matthias $ 20.14 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 15.00 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 8.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 4.50 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 1.25 

Individuals 16.00 

St. Francis, Cherokee 10.00 

Total £2,122,23 

Elizabeth C. Wiese, Treasurer, LI.T.O. 

11 



PATTERSON SCHOOL SERVES 
THE CHURCH 

(Continued from Page 6) 

members has limited the school's ability 
to choose a faculty and inconvenienced 
those already on the staff. The quality 
of our service will be somewhat condi- 
tioned by the fulfillment of this need in 
the near future. 

A special appeal is being made in this 
Diocese for funds to pay for the new 
heating system in Palmyra, the most 
necessary machines for a modern gen- 
eral shop course, completing the roof 
over the gymnasium, and building one 
faculty or chaplain's residence. The 
total cost is $15,800. Of this $1,225 has 
been received to date, leaving a balance 
of $14,575. Several small branches of 
the Woman's Auxiliary have contributed 
most generously. Each contributor 
shares in the larger service his gift en- 



ables Patterson School to render. 

Plans for the future include dormi- 
tories so that we may provide for 120 
to 150 boys, thus doubling our field of 
service and operating more economically 
in so doing; a chapel to be built of 
memorials "instead of flowers" to honor 
loved ones; and a camp with separate 
dining room and cottage facilities. Each 
summer the school opens its doors to the 
young people of the Diocese for a six- 
day camp. When the separate camp 
units are constructed, we shall be able 
to serve other Church organizations — 
Woman's Auxiliary, Men's Clubs, Choirs 
— as well as Boy Scouts and farm or- 
ganizations. 

We appreciate the interest the Church 
people of our Diocese are taking in the 
Patterson School. We shall look to you 
for your prayerful, support to help us 
grow and to help us serve more effec- 
tively. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy who wish to 
supplement the protection for their families given by the Pension Fund, 
and to lay officials and active lay workers of the Church, either volun- 
tary or paid, and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



12 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

By Lanthe Rush Campbell 



DISTRICT MEETINGS 

The fall District Meetings of the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina 
reached an all time high in attendance, 
inspiration and interest. Bishop Henry 
attended all the meetings and gave a 
comprehensive picture of our Diocese. 
He reminded the women that there are 
sixty-nine churches in the Diocese with 
fifteen active clergymen. One priest is 
serving nine congregations. Thirteen 
churches are closed and there are priests 
getting salaries as low as $2,000 a year. 
Fifty years ago, there were nineteen 
active priests and four active deacons. 
There are more churches that are closed 
today than fifty years ago. Bishop Hen- 
ry urged the women to see that every 
parish and mission accept its apportion- 
ment and assessment. Our Bishop gave 
every woman a real challenge, and under 
his enthusiastic leadership we look for- 
ward to real growth in our Diocese. 

Following Bishop Henry's address at 



each meeting, Miss Fletcher introduced 
Miss Avis Harvey of New York, the 
National Secretary of Christian Educa- 
tion. Miss Harvey spoke on woman's 
work in the church. She gave a detailed 
picture of the Church's task and wom- 
an's part in the task. Women's program 
in the Church is nothing other than the 
Prog-am of the Church. Sometimes we 
are apt to think of the women's program 
as money. That may be good or bad. 
If you think of the budget as work in 
China, Africa, and other parts of the 
world, then it is good. For our Church 
has a tremendous missionary responsi- 
bility at home and abroad. Miss Harvey 
enumerated the countries where our 
church is carrying on our missionary 
program. She followed this by the tre- 
mendous responsibility we also have on 
the home front. The real problem in 
the United States is evangelization of 
America, whether it be in the country 
or city. Christian Education is a term 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4'/2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 1 1 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 
Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



13 



causing a great deal of excitement. 

Our Church's work is so wide and 
varied that every woman should be ac- 
tive in some phase. The ever present 
task is to try to interest the uninterested 
woman. At the different meetings there 
was a discussion period. One need fore- 
most in the minds of many people was 
a need and desire for more interesting 
church school material and more inter- 
esting auxiliary meetings. The women 
of Western North Carolina hope Miss 
Harvey will come back again soon. 

The offering goes to Valle Crucis to 
buy a range for the parish house. 



Way"— Miss 
-Mrs. R. 



The following speakers are available 
for your program: 

"Personal Religion"— Mrs. Mark Jen- 
kins. 

"The Church and Social Service" — 
Mrs. W. I. Carpenter. 

"Why I am an Episcopalian" — Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg.. Asheville, N. C. 



"The Church and Its 
Lucy Fletcher. 

"Christian Race Relations' 
L. Sanborn. 

"United Thank Offering"— Mrs. 
George Weise. 



A RARE SPIRIT PASSES 

Death which came last night to Mrs. 
Pearl Dixon Balthis carried from the 
community a rare personality, a woman 
whose life had been devoted for the past 
40 years to her home, her church and 
her community. Until disease laid its 
heavy hand upon her some two years 
ago she was active in church and civic 
affairs, continuing some of those activi- 
ties until long after her health became 
such as to largely incapacitate her for 
work. 

In her passing, the community sus- 
tains a heavy loss and her host of 
friends are deprived of a glowing per- 
sonality, contact with which brought 
them pleasure through a long period of 
years. — "The Gastonia Gazette". 

Editor's Note: Mrs. Balthis' death 
on November 21st is a blow to the whole 
Diocese as well as to her parish church 
and the Woman's Auxiliary. We extend 
our deepest sympathy to Mr. Balthis. 



Jeep Given To Holy Cross, 
Valle Crucis 

The priest-in-charge at Valle Crucis 
is still a bit amazed at the great good 
fortune which came to the mission in 
the form of a brand new Jeep truck 
which was given to the church. During 
the summer Fr. Leach had put an ad in 
a church paper asking for such a vehicle, 
but it seemed rather hopeless. In the 
interest of honesty and accuracy, it must 
be reported that the gift did not come 
as a result of the ad. A personal friend 
knew of the need and made the gift. 
The truck has already been put to hard 
use in serving a down river mission sta- 
tion and in hauling supplies for the 
quonset hut floor which is reaching com- 
pletion. It is expected to have the build- 
in? in use well before Christmas. 



14 



Bishop Visits The Southwest 

Bishop Henry paid his first visitation 
to the missions which are under the care 
of the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, and al- 
though there were no hikes on the 
agenda, there seems to have been every- 
thing else. On Sunday, October 31st, 
there was a service at Highlands at 11, 
At 2 p. m. St. Francis' of Assisi Church, 
Cherokee, was consecrated and two per- 
sons confirmed. At 5 o'clock there was 
a service at St. Cyprian's, Franklin, fol- 
lowed by a supper served in the mission 
house. To round out the evening there 
was a service at 8 at St. Agnes', Franklin. 

All Saints' Day was quiet, early ser- 
vice, luncheon meeting at Highlands, 
consecration of St. John's Cartooge- 
chaye, and supper meeting at St. Agnes'. 

On Tuesday afternoon a visit was 
made to Murphy for confirmation of two 
children from a new negro group which 
has been meeting under the direction of 
Mr. Posey Blackwell. After a supper 
meeting, the bishop preached and held 
confirmation at the Church of the Mes- 
siah. 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

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The Tatters on School 




Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. "/iese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
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Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
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DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



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A RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN 
OUR BORDERS 

(Continued from Page 4) 
types of institutions, as we are not spe- 
cially an orphanage, but provide the 
means of home and school for young 
children who find it necessary to be 
away rfom their families, and may still 
not have to remain here throughout the 
twelve months of the year. The full 
rounds of childhood activities find their 
usual expression and one is aware of the 
central place of the necessity of the rudi- 
ments of religion and education as a 
solid foundation for life which equips a 
child to assume the obligations and privi- 



leges that the Diocese and Church at 
large make available for them as they 
grow to the full statue of adulthood. 

SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

IOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic course* fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



1 6 



tMKgManb 
CTjurcgman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
VOL. XIX FEBRUARY, 1949 NO. 8 




400 tlj AmtroerBanj 

Honk of 
(Common Prag?r 

15494949 



GUjurrljman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943. at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March i, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rev. M. George Henry, 
46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



The Bishop's Caravan 

On February 22nd something new will 
be added to our Diocese. The clergy 
will be given the opportunity to learn 
at first hand what is going on in every 
parish and mission. Under the direction 
of the Bishop, a motorcade will leave 
Asheville for a three day tour of the 
Diocese. The purpose of this tour is 
simple in conception, but its results will 
have far-reaching effect on the whole 
life and work of the 'Household of God." 
As every priest now engaged in active 
work becomes better acquainted with 
the work and possibilities of each field, 
he will come back to his home parish 
with a renewed enthusiasm for the tasks 
that lie before every clergyman and lay- 
man in the Diocese. Because real en- 
thusiasm is infectious, he will be able 
to pass his enthusiasm on to the laymen 
under his pastoral care. 

There are already abundant signs that 
this Diocese is stirring with new vigor. 
The recent decision of the Executive 
Council to make this a self-supporting 
Diocese in 1949, successful canvasses 
being reported from many parishes and 



missions, and the very encouraging fin- 
ancial picture which is reported in this 
issue of The Highland Churchman, 
are only a few of the signs of growing 
strength. 

When our priests come back from 
their unprecedented tour and tell the 
story of what they have seen and where 
there are even greater tasks to be done, 
we are confident that we shall go "from 
strength to strength." 



Hail and Farewell 

We take this opportunity to welcome 
to the Diocesan Family its newest mem- 
ber, the Rev. Richard J. Lee, now rector 
of St. Luke's, Lincolnton. Fr. Lee comes 
to us from the Diocese of Chicago where 
he has had a most successful pastorate 
and where he has been most active in 
the work of that Diocese. In the short 
time he has been at Lincolnton the work 
there has felt the impact of having a 
resident priest. Much has been done 
already to improve the material resourc- 
es of the parish and we are confident 
that the more important spiritual re- 
sources are not going neglected. 

It is with real sorrow that we have to 
accept the fact of Fr. Ralph Webster's 
resignation as rector of St. Francis', 
Rutherfordton. Fr. Webster is leaving 
in February to assume charge of a grow- 
ing mission in Daytona Beach. We are 
sure his acceptance comes as the result 
of a real ''call", for it is a reversal of the 
usual trend when we hear of a priest 
going from a thriving parish to a mission. 
His leaving will make a vacancy which 
will be hard to fill, but we can only wish 
him Godspeed and success in his new 
work. 

NEWS 

Again we plead for news from the 
Parishes and Missions. The editor gets 
awfully tired of making up news out of 
clip sheets. Doesn't anything news- 
worthy happen in your Parish? 



Executive Council Meets 

The Executive Council of the Diocese 
met at the Diocesan House January 11, 
1949, and enjoyed the hospitality of the 
Bishop's House for lunch. Air. V. Jor- 
dan Brown reported $23,387.57 cash re- 
ceived for the Bishop's House, with 
about $950.00 outstanding in pledges yet 
to be paid. In the course of the meeting 
an additional $3,000.00 in pledges was 
revealed. Acceptance and reasonable 
expectations for the 1949 Apportionment 
or Church's Program for the Diocese 
totaled $18,300.00 or more. Mr. Red- 
wood reported a good year financially 
for 1948, with a balance of about $1,- 
000.00 in the fund for the Bishop's sal- 
ary and between $4,500.00 and $5,000.00 
balance on hand in the Missionary Sti- 
pend Fund, due in great measure to 
vacancies. This condition of finances 
taken as a whole induced the Finance 
Department to recommend no asking 
from National Council for 1949 clergy 
salaries, and the Executive Council 
passed this recommendation without 
"batting an eye." This momentous de- 
cision, however, deserves comment. So 
far as we know this is the first time in 
its history this Diocese has not asked for 
help from the National Council (aside 
from Woman's Auxiliary United Thank 
Offering women workers always consid- 
ered an "extra" and at work in many 
strong dioceses) in meeting its regular 
budget, and is a mile-stone in our pro- 
gress. 

Other most important business of the 
Council was re-organization of various 
committees and commissions under one 
or the other of the five main Depart- 
ments of Missions, Christian Education, 
Social Relations, Finance, or Promotion. 



Diocesan Boundaries 

All six members of the special Com- 
mittee of Convention to consider pos- 
sible change in Diocesan boundaries 
within the State met at the Diocesan 
House January 1 1th preparatory to talks 
in Raleigh, N. C, January 27th with 



similar committees from the Dioceses of 
North Carolina and East Carolina. The 
Rev. G. M. Jenkins, Chairman, presided. 
Other members are Rev. James P. 
Burke, Rev. C. G. Leavell, Hon. Kings- 
land Van Winkle, Mr. W. L. Balthis, 
and Mr. S. Walker Blanton. 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO BISHOP'S 
HOUSE AND ENDOWMENT FUND 



Source 


Cash 


Pledges 


Trinity, Asheville $6,575.00 


$350.00 


All Souls, Biltmore 


3,835.95 


100.00 


St. Francis, 






Rutherfordton 


2,782.00 




Holy Cross, Tryon 


2,185.32 




Grace, Morganton 


2,612.25 


1,000.04 


St. Mark's, 






Gastonia 


300.00 




St. James, 






Black Mountain 


500.00 




St. James, 






Hendersonville 


250.00 


750.00 


St. Luke's, Boone 


180.00 




Grace, Waynesville 


171.00 




St. James, Lenoir 


148.00 




St. Paul's, 






Wilkesboro 


143.50 




St. Philip's, Brevard 


125.00 




St. John's, Marion 


125.00 




Incarnation, 






Highland 


105.10 




Chapel of Rest, 






Legerwood 


90.00 




Good Shepherd, 






Penland 


50.00 




St. Agnes, Franklin 


50.00 




Christ School, Arder 


l 36.00 




St. Mary's, Asheville 


! 35.00 




Ascension, Hickory 


24.76 




St. Luke's, 






Chunn's Cove 


10.00 




St. Stephen's, 






Morganton 


9.30 




Redeemer, Asheville 


5.00 




Outside 


50.00 





TOTALS $20,399.18 $4,200.00 

TOTAL CASH 
& PLEDGES $24,599.18 



Lincolnton Rector Installed 

Bishop Henry installed the Rev. Rich- 
ard J. Lee as Rector of St. Luke's 
Church at an evening service on Sunday, 
December 17th. The new rector came 
to Lincolnton on December 5th from the 
Diocese of Chicago where he had been 
rector of Grace Church, Hinsdale, Illi- 
nois, for nearly 27 years. 

Fr. Lee left a very distinguished re- 
cord of service to the Diocese of Chicago. 
He was a member of The Bishop and 
Council, Board of Church Extension, 
Chairman of Missions Becoming Par-' 
ishes, Trustee of the Chicago Church 
Home for Aged, Trustee of the Chicago 
Cathedral Board, a member of the 
Diocesan Audit and Appropriations 
Committee, the President of the Chicago 
Clergy Round Table and a trustee of 
DuPage County Tuberculosis Board. 

Recently St. Luke's has installed a 
new oil heating system in the rectory, a 
stoker in the Church, and the men of 
the parish are now giving their Satur- 
days in painting the exterior of the par- 
ish house. It is expected that a memo- 
rial pulpit in harmony with the beauti- 
fully carved altar will be presented to 
the Church in the near future. Another 
expected gift will be new lantern lights 
for the nave which will be in keeping 
with the Gothic architecture of the 
building. 

The Every Member Canvass, delayed 
until the new rector arrived, it now 
under way and already shows every in- 
dication of being most successful. 



Organ Fund Increases 
At St. Mary's 

At the parish meeting of St. Mary's 
Parish, Asheville, it was announced that 
the Organ Fund had reached a total of 
#1,577.80. This amount is now on de- 
posit drawing interest, and is the result 
of only ten months of effort to raise a 
fund. 

The Christmas offering reached a total 
of nearly #400. In the parish paper 
"The Angelus" Fr. Webbe in comment- 
ing on this splendid offering wrote, "The 



consecrated generosity of St. Mary's 
people is continually noteworthy, and 
continually humbling. However, what 
else could be expected of people who 
take for their Patron Saint the Blessed 
Mother of God who herself gave all — 
and received All. 

There are now 140 communicants in 
the parsih, the largest number in its 
history. 



TO OBSERVE 400TH ANNIVERSARY 

OF THE BOOK OF COMMON 

PRAYER 

New York, N. Y., — Observances all 
over this country, also in the various 
parts of the British Commonwealth, 
will mark the 400th anniversary of the 
first Book of Common Paryer used in 
services of the Church of England. The 
Book of Common Prayer used by the 
Protestant Episcopal Church grew from 
the original Church of England and 
Church of Scotland Books. 

Plans for the commemoration are be- 
ing made in this country by a Commit- 
tee of the Episcopal National Council, 
and overseas by a special committee ap- 
pointed by the Archbishops of Canter- 
bury and York. The celebrations are 
expected to reach a climax overseas dur- 
ing May and June, and in this country 
at the General Convention of the Epis- 
copal Church in the autumn, at San 
Francisco. 



Miss Blair of Saluda Dies 

Miss Rachel Elizabeth Blair died at 
her home in Saluda on December 21st. 
She was 84 years old. Since coming to 
reside in Saluda many years ago Miss 
Blair had been active in the Church's 
work, always faithful in Church attend- 
ance, a member of the Woman's Auxili- 
ary, and a teacher in the Sunday School. 
She had been in failing health for a year 
or more. Miss Blair took an active in- 
terest in community matters. 

The burial service was said at The 
Transfiguration on the afternoon of De- 
cember 22nd, the Rev. J. B. Sill officiat- 
ing. Interment was in Macon, Ga. 



Convocation of Morganton 



THE PRIEST'S FELLOWSHIP met 

in St. Francis', Rutherfordton, January 
13th, the Rev. G. D. Webbe, President 
of the Fellowship, presiding. The Rev. 
A. W. Aucock read a most scholarly and 
helpful paper on "The Virgin Birth". 
In the afternoon session the Rt. Rev. 
M. G. Henry, D. D., spoke on "The 
Book of Common Prayer", emphasizing 
our unity of worship as found therein, 
and bringing out its teaching and preach- 
ing possibilities. This was the first 
meeting of the Fellowship Bishop Henry 
has been able to attend; the clergy are 
grateful for his stimulating contribution 
at this meeting and for the fact that they 
can look forward to this intimate con- 
tact with their Bishop. 

GRACE CHURCH, MORGANTON, 
held its annual parish meeting January 
18th with about a hundred persons pres- 
ent. Mr. J. E. Erwin, Senior Warden 
for the past year, recalled some of the 
earlier days of the parish, remarked on 
its growth, and expressed his willingness 
to relinquish his place on the Vestry to 
some of the younger and more hand- 
some men of the parish. Junior Warden 
H. M. Walton followed Mr. Erwin's talk 
with another delightful mixture of humor 
and hope for the Parish. Dr. P. N. De- 
Vere as Canvass Chairman and Treas- 
urer reported nearly $10,000.00 pledged 
for 1949, an increase in Church's Pro- 
gram pledges which he hoped would be 
pleasing to the Bishop and his program 
for the Diocese, and reduction of the 
Rectory mortgage principal to $10,- 
400.48 from the original $15,000.00 bor- 
rowed, with over a thousand dollars on 
hand yet to be applied thereon. Mr. 
J. T. Roughton reported 94 enrolled in 
Church School with a peak of 80 present 
recently. Mr. F. W. Davis reported 
activity of the Woman's Auxiliary; Mrs. 
H. L. Riddle, Jr., reported for the Altar 
Guild; Mrs. Donnel Van Noppen for the 
choir; Mr. John Oxford and Miss Alice 
Whisnant for St. Mary's Mission; Miss 
Florence Chaffee for the Y.P.S.L.; Scout 



Douglas Van Noppen for Boy Scouts; 
Scout Douglas Leavell for Cub Scouts; 
Mrs. John Berry and Scout Betty Land- 
ingham for Girl Scouts; and Mr. W. E. 
Cobb for the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. 
Those elected to the Vestry for a three 
year term were Lt. Col. C. M. Walton, 
Mr. Henry E. Colton, Mr. William Kez- 
ziah (formerly of St. Andrew's, Canton), 
and Mr. Hugh Bigham. Thev succeed 
Mr. J. E. Erwin, Dr. J. S. Howell, Mr. 
H. L. Riddle, Jr., nad Dr. P. N. DeVere. 



Hickory Church Badly 
Damaged 

Fire that originated from a stove in 
the parish house, badly damaged the 
Church of the Ascension, Hickory, on 
December 23rd. The fire, coming just 
before Christmas, would have caused 
more loss if it had not been for the fact 
that much of the silver and brass had 
been removed for cleaning. Some of the 
hangings and a good many hymnals and 
prayer books were removed before suf- 
fering damage by fire and water. 

The Christmas Eve midnight service 
was held in the First Presbyterian 
Church, and since that time regular Sun- 
day services are being held in the City 
Hall. 

The congregation of Ascension have 
been planning for some time to erect a 
new Church, but building had not been 
contemplated before next September. 
Although insurance was carried on the 
church building and equipment, nego- 
tiations had been underway to sell the 
building for more than the insurance 
coverage. 

The Church of the Ascension was one 
of the oldest church buildings in the 
diocese, having been built in 1878. The 
Rev. Robert B. Cambell is the present 
rector. 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH 

CAROLINA FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS 

lanuary 15th, 1948, to January 15th, 1949 

On Assessment For On Quota For 

Support Of The Diocese Program Of The Church 

Made Paid PARISHES Accepted Paid 

Asheville, Trinity $ 2,507.44 $ 3,101.17 

Asheville, St. Mary's 430.71 543.65 

Asheville, St. Mathas' 291.86 162.68 

Biltmore, All Sous' 2,233.55 1,664.53 

Brveard, St. Philip's 384.53 252.25 

Flat Rock. St. John's 219.74 219.74 

Fletcher, Calvary 650.00 677.00 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 792.20 877.00 

Flendersonville, St. James' 684.25 684.25 

Hickory, Ascension 637.22 692.22 

Lenoir, St. James' 495.39 493.35 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 471.50 253.62 

Marion, St. John's 382.70 382.70 

Morganton, Grace 1,119.88 1,450.46 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis' 657.98 682.47 

Tryon, Holy Cross 1,269.25 1,242.19 

Waynesville, Grace 284.27 284.27 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 179 42 179.44 



$ 891.35 


$ 900.00 


207.39 


203.69 


99.66 


50.00 


794.16 


797.47 


135.58 


135.38 


70.76 


70.76 


261.66 


261.72 


281.67 


281.64 


243.27 


243.29 


226.57 


226.57 


175.43 


179.44 


167.64 


167.64 


136.07 


136.07 


398.18 


398.18 


233.95 


233.95 


451.29 


413.71 


101.07 


101.07 


63.80 


63.80 


£4,939.69 


$4,864.58 


35.00 


35.00 


36.73 


35.73 


16.72 


16.72 


17.49 


18.07 


10.00 




10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


87.27 


43.64 


30.00 


30.00 


24.91 


24.91 


60.54 


60.54 


6.00 




13.11 


13.00 


61.35 


61.55 


10.00 


13.50 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


52.36 


52.36 


10.00 


10.00 


25.00 


25.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


20.00 


12.00 


12.00 


10.00 


10.00 


18.00 


18.00 


30.50 


30.50 


10.00 


10.00 


67.30 


67.30 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


43.00 


54.20 


12.00 




10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


6.00 


18.00 


10.00 


10.00 


12.00 


12.00 


$ 895.69 


$ 786.02 



TOTAL $13,671.69 213,842.99 

MISSIONS 

Arden, Christ School 85.00 85.00 

Asheville, The Redeemer 100.50 50.50 

Asheville, St. Luke's 47.03 49.03 

Ashevile, Trinity Chapel 49.18 62.03 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 80.10 32.00 

Baever Creek, St. Mary's 21.55 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 27.30 52.40 

Black Mountain, St. James 245.43 122.72 

Blowing Rock, Strngfellow M. 56.84 63.44 

Boone, St. Luke's 70.06 70.06 

Canton, St. Andrew's 190.29 106.25 

Cullowhee, St. Davd's 8.50 

Edneyvlle, St. Paul's 36.87 56.74 

Franklin, St. Agnes 193.10 201.43 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 16.25 38.33 

Glen Alpine, St. Paul's ___. 12.00 13.29 

Glendale Springs, Holy Trinity 17.30 

High Shoas, St. John's 21.11 21.11 

Highlands, Incarnation 147.26 147.26 

Hot Springs, St. John's 10.00 10.00 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 81.95 81.95 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 18.33 

Lincoln. Woodside, Our Saviour 3 7.15 37.25 

Little Switzerland, Resurrection 30.50 

Morganton, St. Mary's 60.12 99.58 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 13.82 24.82 

Murphy, Messiah 25.58 64.18 

Rutherfordton. St. Gabriel's 85.99 62.00 

Saluda, Transfiguration 55.00 64.45 

Shelby, The Redeemer 189.30 189.30 

Sylva, St. John's 15.74 

Todd. St. Matthew's 8.05 8.25 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 133.96 456.63 

Asheville, Grace 17.70 9.45 

Blackstone, Mission 5.00 3.35 

Cashiers, Good Shepherd 10.00 

Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 13.00 16.26 

Dutch Creek. St. Anthony 

Edneyville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Lincolnton, St. Stephen's 

Linville, All Saints 24.40 18.00 

Morganton, St. Elizabeth's 

Penland. Good Shepherd 30.55 83.20 

Rutherfordton. Missions 8.00 50.00 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 11.00 11.00 

Upward, St. John Baptist 61.00 66.65 

Valle Crucsi, St. lolin Baptist 



.TOTAL $ 2,358.57 $ 2,527.91 



$5,835.38 $5,660.60 GRAND TOTAL $16,030.26 $16,370.70 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Lanthe Rush Campbell 

WORSHIP STUDY SERVICE 

GIFTS FELLOWSHIP 

PRAYER 

God, who hast opened to me the 
door of this New Year, go with me into 
it. I know not what a day may bring 
forth, but all my way is known to Thee. 
Guide my feet that I may not stumble, 
and keep me lest I go astray. If my way 
shall be in the sunshine, keep me humble 
and make me unselfish. If the darkness 
of sorrow shall cover me, take my hand 
and let me feel Thee near. May Thy 
Holy Spirit lead me in all the way 
through which I shall pass, and help 
me to live this year as if it were my last; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 
' STUDY — CHINA 

We are deeply concerned with the 
present and future of China. No one 
really knows exactly how many Chinese 
there are. However, we feel that we 
can safely say there are between four 
hundred and fifty and five hundred mil- 
lion. Eighty per cent of them are de- 
pendent on agriculture, and if we exclude 
Manchuria, there are only about 217,- 
000,000 acres of land under cultivation, 
as compared with approximately 365,- 
000,000 acres under cultivation in the 
United States. The average Chinese 
farm is 4.18 acres; the average farm in 
America is 157 acres. In China more 
than 100,000,000 people are city dwell- 
ers, the majority of whom depend on 
trade for a livelihood. About 95 per cent 
of business is still done by the old type 
shop handling, one class of commodity, 
grouped together on one street, and or- 
ganized into guilds. China has prac- 
tically no known oil reserves, but she 
dominates the world market in the pro- 
duction of tungsten. What happens to 
China will deeply affect the lives of all 
of us. 

SERVICE 

Miss Virginia Greene, Diocesan Altar 
Guild Chairman, and Mrs. M. C. Mc- 




Mrs. A. B. Stoney 

The lady whose picture appears here 
was wronged by poor proof reading on 
the part of our large corps of proof 
readers. In a recent issue of the High- 
land Churchman, MR. Stoney was 
given credit for being co-chairman of the 
committee charged with raising the 
House and Endowment Fund. 

Laren have started a noteworthy pro- 
ject of securing white Altar hangings 
for the chapel of The Transfiguration at 
Kanuga Lake. 

We all love the Chapel at Kanuga, 
and any gift that we can make, large or 
small, will be most deeply appreciated. 
The needs are— white super frontal, 
white pulpit hanging, and white book 
markers. Please send your contribu- 
tions to Mrs. M. C. McLaren, 35 Cum- 
berland Circle, Asheville. 

Mrs. Alex Menzies, Diocesan Supply 
Chairman, has received a letter from the 
Rev. Aristides Zillafane, rector of St. 
John's Spanish congregation, Senturce, 
Puerto Rico, in which he thanked the 
women of the diocese for the most ac- 
ceptable box of clothing. He said that 
they are trying to make the congregation 
of St. John self-supporting in the next 
two years. Mrs. Menzies stated that 
the next request for supply work will be 
sent to you around February 1st. 



Remember we want news from you 
for this page. 

LORD REVIVE THY CHURCH 
BEGINNING WITH ME. 



Early Days of Grace 

Church, Morganton 

By The Rev. J. B. Sill 

In reading of the days when our 
Churches in Western North Carolina 
began to organize, there was no one of 
them that had a more promising begin- 
ning than that of Grace, Morganton. 
Prominent families in Burke County 
were ready to form an Episcopal con- 
gregation when the Rev. E. M. Forbes 
came as the first missionary in 1841. 
Before then we find ministrations to 
Church families by "Parson" Miller who 
had formed a parish near Lenoir. Mor- 
ganton had attained some reputation be- 
cause of the State Supreme Court hold- 
ing its summer sessions there. Besides 
the prevailing agriculture, gold mining 
was carried on in places not many miles 
distant. 

The first Church, a frame building 
with bell tower, was completed in 1847, 
the Rev. J. C. Huske, Deacon, having 
taken charge of the recently organized 
parish. It was consecrated in the same 
year by Bishop Ives. Services had been 
held in the town for several years and 
24 communicants were reported in 1848. 
Mr. Huske was made priest in 1849 and 
continued as rector until 1851. After 
Mr. Huske's time, the Rev. J. T. Pick- 
ett, Deacon, left a record of a faithful 
pastorate. He returned to make Mor- 
ganton his home upon his retirement 
and is buried in the Churchyard. 

For ten years from 1857, the Rev. S. 
C. Roberts was rector, being succeeded 
by the Rev. Neilson Falls. The latter 
also had a continued attachment to the 
parish and returned there before his 
death and burial in the Churchyard. 
During Mr. Falls' rectorship E. M. Joy- 
ner was made deacon in 1873 and later 
priest in Grace Church. So in its earliest 
days, Grace Church had the outstanding 
record of being the scene of five ordina- 
tions to the sacred ministry. 

I am indebted to the Rev. W. S. 
Stoney for most of the information given 
in this sketch. While rector of Grace 
Church he published an "Historical 
Sketch of Grace Church" in 1935. 



Fr. Webster Resigns 

It has been announced that St. Fran- 
cis, Rutherfordton, has regretfully ac- 
cepted the resignation of its rector, the 
Rev. Ralph K. Webster. Fr. Webster 
has accepted the call to Holy Trinity 
Church, Daytona Beach, in the Diocese 
of South Florida. He is to take up his 
duties there in February. 

Fr. Webster came to Rutherfordton 
in 1946 from Puerto Rico where he had 
been engaged in educational mission 
work. He was the first head of the 
Colegic Agricultura, an agricultural 
school for boys. Before going to Puerto 
Rico, Fr. Webster served as a master 
at Christ School, Arden, in order to 
familiarize himself with school admin- 
istration. 

In the few years he has been in Ruth- 
erfordton, he has done much to advance 
the work of the Church there. Under 
his leadership extensive repairs have 
been effected on the Church and the 
membership was growing. 

The Vestry of St. Francis' Church has 
not yet announced a successor. 



Endowment Fund Chairman 
Speaks 

Mr. V. Jordan Brown, chairman of 
the committee charged with raising the 
#50,000 combined bishop's house and 
endowment fund, has given the following 
statement to be used exclusively by The 
Highland Churchman. 

"We are almost half way to our goal 
of #50,000 and we hope that further 
contributions will continue to come in. 
Many parishes and missions have not 
yet been heard from. 

From a total of #24,599.18 cash and 
pledges, #1,050.00 is designated for the 
Endowment Fund, leaving #23,549.18 to 
pay for the house which cost #27,880.00. 
It is our earnest desire that we free the 
Bishop's House of the mortgage by 
July 1st." 



Supper Meeting at Waynesville Bishop Gribbin Writes Article 

"The Pacific Chuchman", diocesan 
magazine of the Diocese of California, 
had as a lead article in its January issue, 
"The Use of the Collects in Worship" 
which was written by Bishop Gribbin. 
The author wrote that the value of the 
Prayer Book as an aid to worship de- 
pends to a large extent on how well the 
worshipper understands the meaning of 
the Collects. Since it is impossible to 
realize the full beauty and meaning of 
the Collect in the brief time it takes the 
Minister to read it during the service, 
the article urged the worshipper to read 
and study the Collect before the service 
begins, preferably at home. The main 
part of the article was devoted to an 
analysis of the Collect for Purity from 
the Communion Service, discussing in 
some detail the five parts: The Address, 
the Basis of the Address, the Petition, 
the Aspiration, the Mediation. 

In addition to his work in assisting 
the Bishop of California, Bishop Gribbin 
taught a course on the Prayer Book to 
the members of the Cathedral staff. He 
left California on December 15th to take 
up his work at Hobe Sound, Florida. 



The annual congregational meeting of 
Grace Church was held January 14th 
in the Parish House. Supper was serv- 
ed before the business session. 

The Rev. Edgar Goold, rector of the 
church, discussed the progress of the 
church work and the following commit- 
tee chairmen reported: Mrs. John Tay- 
lor, Miss Clara Belle Williams, Mrs. 
William I. Lee, Robert Hill, and Miss 
Rosemary Britten. L. K. Barber, senior 
warden, and Mrs. J. F. Abel, church 
treasurer, also gave talks. 

David Felmet and Robert Hill were 
elected vestrymen to serve with those 
already in office. 

A rising vote of thanks was given to 
William McCallum for his assistance in 
the renovation of the church rectory. 

Members of the Young People's Ser- 
vice League served the supper, which 
was planned and prepared by Mrs. 
Cleveland Kirkpatrick, Mrs. Janie Love 
Taliaferro, Mrs. William Lee, and Mrs. 
Roy Campbell. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4'/2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



Hendersonville's Rector 
Injured In Fall 

The Rev. James P. Burke, rector of 
St. James Church, has been taken to an 
Asheville Hospital for treatment of in- 
juries suffered in a fall on the night of 
January 18th. 

Mr. Burke had attended a basketball 
game and was returning to his home 
when he fell from a wall in the darkness. 
He suffered fractures of the ankle and 
leg, a shoulder injury and body bruises. 

ARMED FORCES RELIGIOUS 
PREFERENCE REGISTRATION 

Under a new system of registration, 
inductees in the armed forces may state 
their religious preference by denomi- 
nation. Thus the members of the Epis- 
copal Church called for service should 
register "Episcopalian." By registering 
his definite Church connection, the man 
in service will be sought out by a chap- 
lain of the Episcopal Church where 
there is one. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg.. Asheville. N. C. 



Mixed Marriages 

'The Conference (Lambeth) earnest- 
ly warns members of our Communion 
against contracting marriages with Rom- 
an Catholics under the condition impos- 
ed by modern Roman Canon Law, es- 
pecially as these conditions involve, 
among other things, a promise to have 
their children brought up in a religious 
system which they themselves cannot 
accept." 

A Committee of the Bishops went 
further, to say, of the promises required 
by the Roman authorities, that for an 
Episcopalian "To Give Such An Under- 
taking (i.e. promise) is a sin." 

Lest any misunderstand, Lambeth 
was not interested in picking a fight with 
Roman Catholics over marriage. Quite 
the contrary, the fight began in 1908 
when the Holy See declared excommuni- 
cate any of its adherents who were mar- 
ried other than by its own priests, and 
at the same time ruled that any non- 
Roman, to be married by a Roman 
priest, must give up all right in the re- 
ligious education of his children. 

A parent's duty in the religious in- 
struction of his children is too solemn 
an obligation to bargain away. The 
highest authority in the Anglican Com- 
munion has ratified the conviction of 
millions in publicly declaring it is not 
right for an Episcopalian to "bargain 
away" his religious responsibilities to 
his children. 

We don't want mixed marriages any 
more than the Romans. No one can 
prevent young people of different al- 
legiances from falling in love with each 
other. But Lambeth is warning all such 
couples that religious differences should 
be frankly faced, thoughtfully studied, 
and positively settled before marriage 
takes place. 

— From The Church Militant 
Diocese of Massachusetts 
December, 1948 

Thunder without lightning: After 
Lambeth spoke, the Archbishop of 
Canterbury's son married a Roman 
Catholic. He is reported to have signed 
a promise to have his children brought 
up as Roman Catholics. 



10 



"Cruel or Unusual 
Punishment " 

The attention oi the clergy and laity 
of the Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina is called to the abrogation of the 
third provision of Section 8 of the Bill 
of Rights. Bishop M. George Henry 
has notified his clergy that beginning on 
February 21st, all active clergymen in 
the Diocese will make a tour of every 
parish and mission in the Diocese. The 
tour will last until Thursday, February 
24th. 

At the time of the visitation in each 
parish or mission, the clergyman who 
has charge of the work will tell of his 
activities or the lack thereof. 

A letter sent to all clergy by Bishop 
Henry stated that there was an obvious 
need among the clergy for knowledge of 
the work throughout the Diocese. He 
further stated that he did not feel that 
the laity could be expected to be en- 
thusiastic about the Diocesan Program 
until the clergy were well informed and 
enthusiastic about it themselves. 



Compliments 
oi 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 




TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



SiD 


fc§&ii£fcj' 




vm' 




mum 





tmmmmwm 

tT*Tl HIGHEST • SKILLED ■ CRAFTSMANSHIP [Jfi 



*ft— T\+**i\ lrjf ffi bj nyi ft n Tp 



Tfie Rrttersofi School 



Episcopal, School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt . 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs. Nellie H, Gates 
15 1 Tfc Ed. 

• ville. 




STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGE- 
MENT, CIRCULATION, ETC.. REQUIRED BY THE 
ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, AS 
AMENDED BY THE ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1933, 
AND JULY 2. 1946. 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared William F. Toms, 
who, having been duly sworn according to law, deposes 
and savs that he is the Business Manager of THE HIGH- 
LAND' CHURCHMAN and that the following is, to the 
best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management (and if a daily, weekly, semi- 
weekly or triweekly newspaper, the circulation), etc., of 
the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the act of August 24, 1912, as 
amended by the acts of March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946 
(section 537, Postal Laws and Regulations), printed on 
the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, and business managers are: 

Publisher: Department of Promotion — Diocese of West- 
ern North Carolina — Protestant Episcopal Church, Ashe- 
vile, N. C. 

Editor: Rev. W. C. Leach, Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Managing editor: Same. 

Business manager: William F. Toms, Asheville, N. C. 

2. That the owner is: Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina of Protestant Episcopal Church. No stockholders. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgages, and other 



security holders owning or noloing i per cent or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: 
None. 

Wm. F. Toms, Business Manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th day of 
September. 1948. 

(seal) Doris Oates 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for GirU owned by the 
five Diocese of North arid South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XIX 



APRIL, 1949 



No. 10 



A Tf trtnrtmtH, ICtwng Christ 

THE EASTER MESSAGE OF 

The Rt. Rev. Henry Knox Sherrill, 
Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church 

MANY centuries ago a small, pathetic group of disciples 
watched their Master die on the Cross at Calvary. Dis- 
couraged, disillusioned, fearful, they were about to return 
to their homes when something happened which changed them 
completely and sent them out as Apostles of overwhelming Good 
News. Their testimony as to this transforming event was that 
the Living Christ appeared to them. This witness of theirs was 
given no only in words but in the kind of people they were, in 
the heroic way they lived and died. Certainly a great event took 
place. Why should we doubt the sincerity and the conviction 
of their experience? 

"He is Risen." That is the clarion call which has brought 
courage and inspiration to many millions in succeeding centuries. 
Today in our disillusioned and fearful generation, we need to 
realize that our faith is not alone in a crucified Christ of long 
ago but in a victorious, living Christ Who gives men power and 
strength to follow Him. Here once again in our time as it was 
of old is the faith which overcomes the world. God grant that 
Eastertide may make us in our turn courageous witnesses to the 
Living Christ. 



(Elfttrrtjman 



Box 55 



Valle Crucis, N. C. 



Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943. at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue. Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wra. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



BISHOP HENRY VISITS FLETCHER 

Calvary Church, Fletcher, was visited 
by Bishop Henry on Sunday, March 27, 
to administer the sacrament of confirma- 
tion and to dedicate a number of memo- 
rial windows. After the service Bishop 
and Mrs. Henry and the confirmation 
class were honored at a luncheon and 
reception in the parish house. 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins presented the 
class and the memorial windows. The 
windows were in memory of the follow- 
ing: 

The Resurrection windows on the 
Epistle side of the high altar in memory 
of Ruby McDonald Washington, wife 
of Bushrod C. Washington, Jr., and 
given by Mr. Washington. The Cruci- 
fixion windows on the Gospel side of the 
high altar in memory of Henrietta 
Lance, given by her nephew, William 
N. Lance. The baptistry windows in 
memory of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Small 
Neff, given by the Rev. Edgar R. Neff, a 
son and former rector. 

The Matthew-Mark windows in the 
Founders' Chapel, next to the altar in 
memory of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ed- 
ward Dameron, given by the family and 
friends. Mr. Dameron was for many 



years a vestryman at the church and 
Mrs. Dameron was organist for 45 
years. The Luke-John windows in the 
Founders' Chapel in memory of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chauncey Depew Cushing given 
by their children, George Washington 
Cushing and Rebecca Cushing Robert- 
son. 

Also to be dedicated was the cross on 
the high altar given in memory of the 
Rev. Lynne Burgoyne Mead, a former 
rector, given by his aunt, Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Jones. 

In the afternoon, Bishop Henry made 
a visitation to St. Paul's, Edneyville, 
where he preached and confirmed a class 
which had been prepared by the Rev. 
Mr. Jenkins. 



CHURCH SCHOOL BULLETIN 

PUBLISHED BY ST. IAMES, 

LENOIR 

Something new and unusual is being 
done by the Church School in Lenoir 
with the publishing of a monthly bul- 
letin. The one page mimeographed 
sheet contains news of enrollment, at- 
tendance, new members, a sick list and 
items of interest to children and parents. 
As far as is known, this is the only bul- 
letin of its kind ever published by a 
Church School in the Diocese. 



DIOCESAN OFFICE TO BE CLOSED 

The Diocesan Office will be closed 
from April 26th until the close of the 
Clergy Tour of the Diocese, Thursday, 
May 5th. 



IN MEMORIUM 

Our Woman's Auxiliary has sustained 
a real loss in the passing of Mrs. W. L. 
Balthis, who entered the higher life on 
November 21st. She was United Thank 
Offering Custodian from 1929 to 1935; 
Secretary of Missions from 1941 to 1945. 
Auxiliary Representative of the Depart- 
ment of Missions of the Province of 
Sewanee from 1944 to 1947. She repre- 
sented the Woman's Auxiliary at dif- 
ferent Provincial meetings. We extend 
to her family the deepest sympathy of 
the Auxiliary family of our Diocese. 

"Let light perpetual shine upon her". 



Prayer Book Rubrics 



By The Rt. Rev. R. E. Gribbin 

There are three words which should be carefully observed by clergy and 
laity if the possibilities of the Prayer Book worship service are to be realized. 
These words are "shall", "or", "may". They are in the rubrics, the italicized 
directions for the conduct of the service which are printed in the Prayer Book. 
(Rubrics have that name because they formerly were printed in red, and are 
so printed in the Standard Book of Common Prayer in the case of the Custodian. 
Rubrica means red coloring-matter from ruber, red. In The American Prayer 
Book by Parsons and Jones there is the interesting information that rubrics was 
the term applied to chapter headings of the books of civil law because they were 
written in red. This idea that something written in red was a law passed from the 
civil books to the ceremonial directions in the Church service-books.) 

Some of the rubrics are laws. There are disciplinary rubrics and liturgical 
rubrics. The latter are intended to insure ease and uniformity in the conduct of the 
service. They provide for unity of service as well as flexibility and variety. 

If the minister fails to comply with the "shall" rubric, he is depriving the con- 
gregation of that minimum which is regarded as essential for edifying worship. 
There are regular attendants at Church who say that they have not heard the Ten 
Commandments in ten years although there is the rubric that the Decalogue must 
be said at least one Sunday in each month. Again, it is reported that seldom 
does one hear the Long Exhortation on page 85 even on the three Sundays when 
it "shall be said." 

In the "may" or discretionary rubrics the minister should remember that when 
he acts on his discretion then that becomes mandatory as far as the congregation 
is concerned. The laity should be familiar with the rubrics at the beginning of 
Morning and Evening Prayer which permit the omission of the Confession and 
Absolution. Otherwise, they may not be ready to join in the Lord's Prayer if it is 
used after the Creed. The Minister might well ask himself how often he should 
leave out the Exhortation in the choir offices since that statement sets forth the 
elements of worship found in those services. The provision that permits Morning 
and Evening Prayer to be ended after the Third Collect means that frequently no 
Thanksgiving is used. This is a serious matter. "It is a good thing to give thanks." 
"A joyful and pleasant thing it is to be thankful." St. Paul counsels, "In every 
thing give thanks." The Communion office says "that we should at all times, and 
in all places" (certainly in Church) "give thanks". A service without thanksgiving- 
is only a partial service. The General Thanksgiving service reminds us that we are 
to bless God not only for our material gifts but "above all, for thine inestimable 
love in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ; for the means of 
grace, and for the hope of glory." Certainly no service should be minus that 
thought. 

Worship is a corporate act. The rubrics help the layman to take his part. A 
recent article stated that the "amen" at the end of the Prayer of Consecration 
spoken audibly by those present is virtually necessary to a valid Eucharist. The 
rubrics do not direct the worshipper to say "Amen", yet his responsibility for par- 
ticipation is indicated in the various "Answers" and the parts to be said by Priest 
and People. Let us know and follow the rubrics in our worship. 

3 



Young People of The Church 



Diocesan Camp At 
Patterson School 

Plans are under way for the Young 
Churchmen's Camp of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina to be held at 
Patterson School this summer begin- 
ning July 10th and continuing to July 
16th. The Camp has been held at Pat- 
terson School every year since 1943 
when it was organized for the Diocesan 
young people under the Rev. Tracy 
Lamar, Diocesan Secretary for Youth 
Work and first Director of the Diocesan 
Camp. Since that time it has grown 
steadily and has developed quite a tra- 
dition amongst the Young Churchmen 
of the Diocese. 

This year the Rev. G. Mark Jenkins, 
Rector of Calvary Church, Fletcher, is 
to be the Director, with the Rev. C. G. 
Leavell, Rector of Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton, Vice-Director. The Chaplain 
this year is to be the Rt. Rev. M. G. 
Henry, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina, who will also 
teach a class. 

The July 10th-16th dates are about a 
month later than usual because of the 
late closing of school in several localities 
and in order to avoid a conflict with 
Junior and Y. P. S. L. Conferences at 
Kanuga. It is also expected that the 
waters of Buffalo and the Yadkin will 
be a bit warmer for swimmers in July, 
and the vegetables of Happy Valley 
more plentiful to appease the healthy 
appetites of the young ladies (not to 
mention the boys!) attending Diocesan 
Camp. Cost of the Camp this year has 
been set up from $7.00 to $10.00 to take 
care of the increased cost of food and 
play fair with Patterson School as to 
real expense. Registrations may even 
now be sent to the Rev. G. M. Jenkins, 
Calvary Church Rectory, Fletcher, N. 
C, simply by giving name, address, age, 



and sending one dollar. More official 
registration blanks will appear in a later 
issue of The Highland Churchman 



Do you need a program for your 
Young Peoples' Service League? If so, 
write Mary Aston Leavell and arrange 
lor a date for her to visit your League 
and report on the recent meeting of the 
Provincial Youth Commission held at 
Monteagle, Tennessee. She is Diocesan 
President and your member of the 
Youth Commisison of the Province of 
Sewanee. Her address is 301 S. King 
St., Morganton, N. C. 



The Youth Commission which met 
March 5th at the Diocesan House in 
addition to arranging for leadership of 
the Diocesan Camp also provided for a 
brief Diocesan Convention. Prelimi- 
nary plans provide for its being held at 
Patterson School Thursday, July 14th, 
beginning in the afternoon and con- 
tinuing through the early evening, with 
Bishop Henry's address being the climax 
of the Convention. 



We hear that the Ascension, Hickory, 
Young Churchmen meet every Sunday 
night with an enthusiastic gathering at 
the Rectory, and that things are "boom- 
ing" under the leadership of Libby Huff- 
man, President. 



Patsy Peeler is the President of a 
newly - organized group of Young 
Churchmen meeting regularly at Our 
Saviour, Woodside, near Lincolnton. We 
understand the League there has an av- 
erage of around sixteen young people 
at their meetings. 



Joye Reading is President of the St. 
Mark's Gastonia, Young Churchmen, 
and things there are humming under her 
leadership. 



Qualitatively if not quantitatively, the 
Young Peoples' Service League of Grace 
Church, Morganton, is having its best 
year in a long time under the leadership 
of Florence Chaffee, President. Mrs. 
Julia Wayt and Mr. Henry Colton are 
Counsellors who aid the two group lead- 
ers, Clara Kate Boggs and Douglas Van 
Noppen, in arranging the programs at 
Bi-monthly Sunday night supper meet- 
ings in the Parish House. Average at- 
tendance runs around 15 persons. 



Recent programs have been on 
"Choosing a Vocation" and a report of 
the Provincial Youth Commission Meet- 
ing held in February at Monteagle, Ten- 
nessee. 



The Young People of Trinity Church, 
Asheville, meet every Friday evening at 
7:30. They have a social hour with 
games, ping pong, etc., after which they 
proceed with the program and business 
session. New officers for the group are: 
Bill Russell, President; Betty Kirby, 
Vice-President; Margaret Reid, Secre- 
tary; Laura Chapman, Treasurer; Betty 
Shuford, Program Chairman; and Peg- 
gy Jones, Social Chairman. At present, 
they are busily engaged in working out 
programs for several months in advance, 
so that the members will have a preview 
of what is to come each week, instead 
of waiting until they arrive to find out. 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 
MEETING 

The North Carolina Episcopal College 
Student Association met in Raleigh Feb- 
ruary 11-13 in the Church of the Good 
Shepherd and in Christ Church with the 
Episcopal students of State College as 
host. Approximately seventy-five stu- 
dents were present. 

The theme of the convention was The 
Anglican Communion. Dr. Arnold G. 
Nash, Head of the Department of Re- 
ligion, Chapel Hill, gave a series of talks 
on the history of the Anglican Com- 
munion, and discussion groups on the 
subjects Why have the church?, De- 
nominational Differences (Ecumenical 
Movement), Opportunities of Lent, Lay 



and Professional Vocations of the 
Church, Holy Communion, and Prepar- 
ing for Christian Parenthood, were held. 
These groups were led by ministers from 
the dioceses of North Carolina. 

During the business sessions of the 
association a new constitution was pre- 
sented and ratified, and officers of the 
executive council for the coming year 
were elected. The officers elected were: 
Jack Olafson of State College, president; 
Edith Winslow of Chapel Hill, secre- 
tary; Leslie Homan of East Carolina 
Teachers College, first vice president; 
James Hall of St. Augustine College, 
second vice president; Hubert Ray of 
Duke, treasurer; Carl Anderson of East 
Carolina Teachers College, publicity 
chairman; Terry Holmes of Chapel Hill, 
delegate at large. 

The convention was climaxed Satur- 
day night by a banquet held in Christ 
Church when the Rt. Rev. Thomas H. 
Wright of Wilmington, Bishop of East 
Carolina Diocese, spoke on the Lambeth 
Conference. 

Officers of the association were in- 
stalled after Holy Communion Sunday 
morning. 



Dear Father: 

Now that I have completed all my tax 
forms, I will sit me down to send you 
some young people's news. It's about 
time, I can hear you say! 

Provincial Youth Commission 

The mid-winter meeting of the Youth 
Commisison of the Province of Sewanee 
was held from February 11 to 13 at 
Monteagle, Tennessee. Our delegate 
from the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, Miss Mary Aston Leavell, was 
present at this meeting. 

Following supper on the evening of 
the 11th, a service was held, after which 
delegates from the fifteen Diocesses in 
the Province were welcomed. The dele- 
gates then gave a report of the youth 
work in their Diocese and the question- 
aires which had previously been sent to 
the members of the Commission were 
discussed. This is to allow the members 
to get helpful suggestions from each 



5 



other as to the best course to follow in 
expanding Diocesan youth work. 

Special committee chairmen, which 
had been appointed before this meeting, 
gave their reports on the following day. 
Included in these reports was an account 
of the Interdenominational Conference 
at Grand Rapids. The most interesting 
phase of the report of the conference 
was the account of the Socialists, Com- 
munists and Progressives who waited 
every night outside the conference hall 
to try and influence the delegates to fol- 
low their political parties. Mary Aston 
expressed her opinion thus: "It was 
amazing to me to hear of their earnest- 
ness and faith in their beliefs. If we as 
Christians would be as enthusiastic 
about our beliefs as they were about 
theirs, we would have many new con- 
verts." That is certainly true, and I 
am sure we all would echo her words. 
But if all of you are studying your 
PLAN, you should have learned by now 
about Evangelism and how to put it into 
practice. 

The remainder of the meeting con- 
sisted of plans for the Provincial Youth 
Convention, which will be held this 
summer at Monteagle. The last official 
gathering was to attend Sunday services 
at Sewanee. 

Grace Church, Morganton 

New officers were elected recently. 
They are: President, Florence Chafee; 
Vice-President, Douglas Leavell; Secre- 
tary, Doug Van Noppen; and Treasurer, 
Tommy Lyman. Group leaders for this 
up and coming organization are Doug 
Van Noppen and Clara Kate Boggs. 
Note 

Mary Aston volunteeered this infor- 
mation about Grace Church "In case 
you are desperate for news". I can tell 
you that I am. It has been so long since 
anyone has sent in news that I am be- 
ginning to feel the youth of the Diocese 
are hibernating! Please do tell us of 
your activity. The Highland Church- 
man is for the young and old alike, and 
even our older church members enjoy 
reading about the activities of the up 
and coming future churchmen. It is 
hoped that the June issue of the 



Churchman will be devoted entirely to 
Youth, so please send in your news. 
Plan activities, in order that this issue 
will be the best yet, and will give all our 
readers something to think about. , Send 
your news to Helen Thomas, Trinity 
Church, Asheville, N. C. 

Youth Commission Meeting 

The Diocesan Youth Commission met 
Saturday, March 5, in the office of 
Bishop Henry. The Rev. G. Mark 
Jenkins, Chairman, presided. The main 
purpose of the meeting was to make 
plans for the annual Youth Camp at 
Patterson School. This year the camp 
has been planned for July 10-15. It was 
decided to have the camp in July so as 
not to interfere with the Young People's 
Conference at Kanuga, which is held 
June 11-24. The Rev. Mr. Jenkins is 
to direct the camp this year. 

The Bishop is making a full survey 
of the Diocesan Youth Work, so as to 
find out the number of active youth 
groups in the various parishes and mis- 
sions, and just what type group it is, 
such as Junior Altar Guild, Young Peo- 
ple's Service League or Acolyte Guild, 
etc. This will be of great value, and 
will enable the Bishop to know the 
youth who are active in the work of the 
Church, and they, in turn, will feel clos- 
er to the Church in general. 

Another purpose of the meeting was 
to make requisitions for the part the 
young people would have in the Depart- 
ment of Christian Education for 1950. 
It was the first meeting of the Youth 
Commission for 1949, and also the first 
meeting with our Bishop. 

— Helen Thomas. 



RECOGNITION 

An English clergyman preached a 
sermon on the subject "Recognition of 
Friends in Heaven." Next week he re- 
ceived a note which read: "I should 
be much obliged if you would preach 
to your congregation on 'The Recog- 
nition of Friends on Earth, 1 as I have 
been coming to yuor church for six 
months and no one has taken any notice 
of me yet." 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



The Rev. William H. Anthony, B. D., 
Ph. D., will become Priest-in-Charge of 
Redeemer, Shelby, about April 1st. Dr. 
Anthony is a native of Newfoundland, 
but has spent most of his ministry in this 
country, lately having been in charge of 
St. Andrew's, Hartford, Connecticut. 
He was educated at the University of 
Pennsylvania, the Chicago Law School, 
Marberg, Germany, and at Oxford, 
England. 

The new six-room bungalow Rectory 
at Shelby is about ready for occupancy, 
and we trust will actually be occupied 
by Dr. and Mrs. Anthony by the time 
this issue of The Highland Church- 
man goes to press. Dr. Anthony will 
also be Priest-in-Charge of St. Andrew's, 
Bessemer City, at present under the 
ministry of the Rev. W. C. Cravncr. He 
has requested that no aid be given to- 
wards his salary by the Diocese, and 
looks forward to parochial status of Re- 
deemer, Shelby, in the near future. 

There is already some talk in Shelby 
of building at least the first unit of a 
new church in the near future. Con- 
gregations there have recently averaged 
around thirty to forty persons under Mr. 
Edward L. Kemper as Lay Reader. 



It is expected that the Parish House 
of the new Ascension Church, Hickory, 
will be ready for occupancy and to be 
used temporarily for Sunday services by 
early summer. Construction is well un- 
der way, with rock now being laid for 
the church proper, and much of the 
Parish House portion completed. Mean- 
while, 11:00 A. M. services are being 
held at the Court House in Hickory and 
have been attended even better than 
were services at the old church before it 
burned last December. 



Consecration thereof. It is to be sold 
for secular use, proceeds from which 
sale will be applied to the cost of the 
new St. Stephen's. The new misison is 
now under room, and the basement 
about ready for occupancy. The whole 
church will probably be ready for Con- 
secration by the latter part of April or 
the middle of May. April services may 
be held in the basement of the new St. 
Stephen's, located on Bouchelle Street. 



At noon on March 10th Bishop Henry 
held a service in old St. Stephen's Mis- 
sion, Mor^anton, for the Removal of 



The Church School of Grace Church, 
Morganton, Mr. J. T. Roughton, Super- 
intendent, recently set a new record for 
attendance at 87. This has been due in 
large measure to a terrible family fight, 
more or less friendly, between Mrs. A. 
B. Stoney, teacher for the Women's 
Bible Class for many years, and Mr. A. 
B. Stoney who this past fall took over 
leadership and organization of a Men's 
Bible Class. The latter has grown re- 
cently to an enrollment of 23 men, neces- 
sitating repairs on the Parish House 
basement in order to house them in the 
dry, and also making necessary the 
"borrowing" of several old pews not in 
use at St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows. 

A new record attendance for the Wed- 
nesday night Lenten services was set 
when 89 persons attended the first of the 
series of such services being held with 
guest preachers. A newly-organized 
junior Choir, under the direction of 
Miss Lily D. Burley, is singing at these 
services and relieving the regular choir. 
The latter, incidentally, is under the 
direction of the Organist, Mrs. Donnel 
Van Noppen, and at present is flourish- 
ing to such an extent it has a waiting 
list. Lenten preachers in Grace Church 
were the Rev. Richard J. Lee, St. Luke's, 
Lincolnton, March 9th; the Rev. W. C. 
Leach, Holy Cross, Valle Crucis, March 
16th; the Rev. G. M. Jenkins, Calvary, 
Fletcher, March 23rd ; the Rt. Rev. M. 
G. Henry, D. D., March 30th; the Rev. 



R. B. Campbell, Ascension, Hickory, 
April 6th. 

Grace Church x^uxiliary, St. Eliza- 
beth's Chapter in particular, recently 
sponsored a spring fashion show in the 
Parish House netting around sixty dol- 
lars profit, filling the Parish House to 
capacity, and featuring Doncaster dress- 
es^ Diocesan product from nearby 
Rutherfordton. Mrs. Henry E. Colton 
is local Doncaster agent who shared her 
profits with fellow St. Elizabethans. 



The Diocesan Convention is to meet 
in Grace Church, Morganton, May 12th 
and 13th, Thrusday and Friday. All 
overnight reservations of delegates 
should be made through the Rector of 
Grace Church, the Rev. C. G. Leavell, 
301 S. King St., Morganton, N. C. 
Notice of intention to attend the Con- 
vention should also be sent him by all 
delegates and alternates who expect to 
be present even for only a portion of the 
sessions. 



The Convocation of Morganton is to 
hold the presentation of the Lenten mite 
box offering in St. Mary's Mission, 
Quaker Meadows, Sunday, April 24th, 
at 4:00 P. M. St. Mary's is getting 
ready for a large delegation of children, 
and is "sprucing up" for the occasion. 
The old pulpit used in St. Margaret's, 
Morganton, (not inactivated) has been 
placed in St. Mary's and other improve- 
ments made. A new room and a front 
porch have been added to the misison 
house occupied by the Lay Reader, Mr. 
John Oxford, and his family. Mr. 
Joseph Harrison and Mr. Ervin Queen 
did most of the work on this addition, 
and gave a tithe of their labor as well 
as holding down the cost in other ways. 
St. Mary's is located about one-fourth 
of a mile off Highway No. 161 (to right 
going towards Linville) slightly more 
than a mile beyond the town limits of 
Morganton at the Catawba River, on 
second road to right after crossing the 
river. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy who wish to 
supplement the protection for their families given by the Pension Fund, 
and to lay officials and active lay workers of the Church, either volun- 
tary or paid, and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



RENEWED ACTIVITY AT SYLVA 

The congregation of St. John's 
Church, Sylva, has been stirred to re- 
newed activity through the interest of 
a group of laymen and the organization 
recently of a Woman's Auxiliary. The 
men, along with representatives from 
neighboring missions, have had a Lay 
Reader's School under Bishop Henry, 
and are now serving regularly. This 
makes possible services every Sunday, 
though the minister in charge is able to 
come only every other Sunday. 

The congregation of St. John's have, 
at their own initiative and expense, had 
some repairs done on the fabric of the 
Church, have had the whole building 
painted inside and out, and have had a 
new roof put on the Church. All of this 
is definitely an outward, visible sign of 
a renewed spirit. 



NEWS FROM TRINITY, ASHEVILLE 

Trinity is cooperating with the or- 
ganization known as the Churchmen of 
Church Street in presenting a weekly 
series of Lenten services. Every year 
this group combine sthe several church 
forces of Church Street to attract out- 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4'/2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville. N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



standing clergymen as guest preachers 
for union services. 

Mr. Josef Privette has assumed his 
duties as organist and choir master. He 
comes to Trinity after notable services 
at All Souls, Biltmore, and churches in 
Baltimore. He takes the place of Mrs. 
Erwin Heers whose resignation was ac- 
cepted when she moved to Marion. 

The nominations by the Rector of 
Mr. Julian Woodcock as Senior Warden 
and Mr. Lavon Sarafian as Junior War- 
den were unanimously approved by the 
vestry and these men were elected to 
these offices for the ensuing year. 



CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS 
AVAILABLE 

It has been announced that there are 
several scholarships now available for 
those wishing to go to Kanuga from the 
Diocese. There are four scholarships 
for the Young People's Conference, ages 
15 to 19; seven for the Junior Confer- 
ence, ages 12 to 14; and seven scholar- 
ships for the Adult Conferences, ages 
15 and over. 

Young people who would like to apply 
for these waiter's scholarships may do 
so by writing to the Bishop. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

By Lenthe Rush Campbell 



WORSHIP STUDY SERVICE 

FELLOWSHIP 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER 

A World Day of Prayer service was 
held in the Congregational Church at 
Tryon. Mrs. W. T. Capers, Jr., and 
Mrs. W. M. Spivey of the Church of the 
Holy Cross were leaders. Fourteen 
members of the Girls Friendly Society 
of Holy Cross Church took part in a 
youth choir. Twenty-five members of 
Tryon Churches for Colored People sang 
spirituals. There was standing room 
only in the Church. 

In Hickory the World Day of Prayer 
Services were sponsored by The Hick- 
ory Council of Church Women of which 
Mrs. Robert B. Campbell is President. 
A total of six hundred and thirty peo- 
ple attended the services in different 
Churches. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



STUDY 

Many of the Auxiliaries in the Diocese 
are studying the Prayer-Book during 
Lent. The New York Bible and Com- 
mon Prayer Book Society reports that 
it has sent out over one hundred thous- 
and leaflets on the Prayer Book. 

THE BOOK OF COMMON 
PRAYER IN IRISH 

The work of preparing a new transla- 
tion in Irish of the Book of Common 
Prayer, which has been going on for 
some years, is nearing completion. It 
has been undertaken by the Irish Guild 
of the Churc, Cummain Gaedhealach, 
which has had the assistance of several 
priests and laymen of the Church of 
Ireland who are authorities in Gaelic 
scholarship. 

The present Irish edition of the Book 
of Common Prayer is the work of the 
late Canon Paul Quigley. It does not 
contain the entire contents of the Prayer 
Book; for example, only the first fifty 
Psalms in the Psalter have been includ- 
ed. The new translation, however, con- 
tains the whole Book. So far as pos- 
sible, the new form of spelling in Irish 
has been followed. 

— "London Church Times". 



YOUTH WORK 

Twenty-six women of Holy Cross, 
Tryon, are now sponsors of the recently 
organized Girls Friendly Society in that 
Parish. Five new members were ad- 
mitted to the Society in February. 

What is your Branch doing for the 
Youth of your Parish? 



FLASHES FROM THE WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY BOARD MEETING 

The Spring meeting of the Board of 
the Woman's Auxiliary met Wednesday, 
March 16, in Asheville in Bishop Hen- 
ry's office. At the noon hour the mem- 
bers of the Board were guests of Bishop 
and Mrs. Henry at a delightful lunch, 
served in the Bishop's home. 



10 



A few highlights from the meeting are 
as follows: 

The total Fall Offering from the Dis- 
trict meetings amounted to $196.17. 

Tentative plans were made to hold a 
Summer Conference at Valle Crucis 
from July 24-30. 

Tentative dates for the District meet- 
ings are as follows: 

District I. St. Agnes, Franklin, April 
21st. 

District II. St. Philip's, Brevard, 
April 27th. 

District III. Holy Cross, Valle Cru- 
cis, April 28th. 

District IV. St. Francis, Rutherford- 
ton, April 26th. 

District V. St. Gabriel's, Rutherford- 
ton, April 10th. (Palm Sunday) 

The offerings from the district meet- 
ings will go to St. Cyprian's, Lincolnton, 
which has recently been re-opened. 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



ii>Tvii 


k]??3i&&?* 


i^oii 


Hjir] 


i$c-J 


5Tt??"&k' j i 


TV^vTyaS/. 








IP* 



p'HElsi^KEGfti&f 

IMIfirMB^LfirlSSi! 

■°W ^ITC] TT\TA*iQi^wsENE3EE-5T-:j 

I.VjJOjJAVJLL/Ia/ .SYRACUSE -NY "■'♦ Si 



TFk Rrtterson School 




Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of '.Vestern North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. "/iese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs, B 8 P* Holnes, 
15 Edgemont RcU , 
Ashevillc, N* C* 




LIVING COSTS AND CLERGY 
STIPENDS 

In September, 1947, the Church Pen- 
sion Fund released details of the course 
of average clergy stipends over the 
years since the Fund was started. Re- 
cently the Fund's bulletin, "Protection 
Point", which is sent to all clergy, car- 
ried a chart depicting the comparison of 
stipends and the cost of living. The 
chart shows that stipends and living 
costs move along in general in the same 
direction, although there is a time lag 
in the movement of stipends. The Fund 
finds that the clergy stipend average 
continues to go up. It is working to- 



ward adjustment with living costs. The 
stipend increases in recent years have 
been concentrated in the lower salary 
brackets and among the younger clergy. 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girlt owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Rel igious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



CTjutcljmmt w issue 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
VOL. XIX TUNE, 1949 No. 12 ~ 



/;/ 77w Issue 

Highlights of the 27th 
Annual Convention 

Diocesan Youth News 

Patterson Camp 



®ljr ijtgtjlanb 
(tttjttrrljmatt 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943. at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Excerpts From The Bishop's 
Convention Address 

"I have every confidence each of you 
will do everything humanly possible to 
further the effective work of the Church 
. . . You may have noted . . . everything 
that is humanly possible . . . You need 
not just human application, but Divine 
power and serenity to face the world in 
which you are God's chosen witnesses . . . 

In Europe the guns were stilled four 
years ago ... we only have to look at 
the world and see that there is no peace 
in our world on a human level . . . 
Neither is there peace in our economic 
life . . . People have lost their faith in 
the continuance of present conditions . . . 
we shall lose our economic life in an 
effort to save it. 

. . . The war and the immediate after- 
math of the war has done much to dis- 
turb the peace and understanding that 
there was between various racial and 
cultural groups . . . Today we find a 
separation building up, and that coward- 
ly group, that hides behind sheets, the 
Ku Klux Klan, has made its appearance 



just to the south of us . . . 

God's power is not overcome by these 
temporal forces that are attacking us on 
all sides. God's peace is not determined 
by this world and its peace. It stands 
forever one and the same . . . Today in 
our world, there is needed again a strong 
victorious group who know the truth of 
God's victory and who are never over- 
come, and who have peace in a chaotic 
world . . . This is your calling. 

I commend you for your faithfulness 
to your obligation during the time when 
you were without a Bishop. Truly 
something of the grace and power of 
God was in you as you continued in the 
work of spreading God's light in the 
world. 

. . . The great shortage of clergy is 
one of our foremost problems. It is one 
that will not be remedied overnight . . . 
I ask all of you to pray fervently that 
more able men will offer themselves . . . 
Particularly is our shortage in evidence 
when we consider that there is not a 
negro priest active in our Diocese to min- 
ister to seven active congregations of 
negro people . . . 

You have most cordially received me 
and my family into your midst . . . You 
have taken us into your hearts, and I 
pray God I may never disappoint you. 



Twenty - Seven 

We are glad to dedicate most of this 
issue to the youth of the Diocese, for 
the emphasis on youth serves as a re- 
minder that we are members of a young 
Diocese. After all, we are only twenty- 
seven! The Youth Camp Director and 
the Vice-Director, who, alas, are well 
past twenty-seven, know that is young. 
Or if they don't know it now, they will 
by the 16th of July. 

At twenty-seven the Diocese is just 
reaching a point where youthful vigor is 
quite evident. There is a youthful, for- 
ward looking attitude prevailing. This 
is evidenced to by the optimism and 
enthusiasm with which the Convention 
attacked the problems of increased bud- 
get, shortage of clergy and a special as- 
sessment. 



A Message From Bishop Henry 



The Young People of our Diocese are to be the leading members of the Church. 
Therefore, it is important that they know the teachings, programs and life within 
the Church. The whole organization of the Young People is designed to make them 
more able to assume this future leadership. 

In the Young People's group meetings throughout the year this instruction and 
life together fit them for greater participation in the future. The Summer Con- 
ferences and Camp are a period of intensive instruction and life in the church. I 
commend the year-round program to all of you and especially the Camps and 
Conferences. 

We have many able young people — we need more. The Church depends upon 
this group for its continued strength and life. As Chaplain and one of the instruc- 
tors of our Patterson School Camp, I am looking forward to being with this group 
of Young People. I hope to know them intimately and to be able to enter in to 
their hopes and outlook for the future. 

From Your Youth Editor 

Dear Young Churchmen: 

It seems like no time at all since we were all at Patterson Camp in Happy 
Valley, enjoying a week of fun and fellowship. This is the sixth year of the Camp, 
and I am looking forward to it as much as I did the first year. It has been interest- 
ing to watch the growth of the Camp, the number of campers, and the improvement 
in the classes. And Patterson School has also had some added improvements 
which you will note with pleasure when you arrive this July. The gymnasium 
will be ready for our use when it is raining and too wet to have our athletic program 
outdoors. The school Library will certainly miss all the activity this year, espec- 
ially since the library is the place where quiet reading and study is always done! 

As I have done in past years, I will list here the things the new campers might 
need to know before coming to Camp. We hope that there will be many new faces 
this year, as well as many familiar ones. For classes, you should bring Prayer 
Book and Bible and notebooks and pencils. For entertainment, bring any musical 
instrument that you can play and all the ideas you have for "stunt night", such 
as short skits or plays, readings or quiz program dialog. We will hope to have 
a camp fire program one evening, so you might need a flashlight to guide you back 
to the camp. 

There is nothing formal about our life at Patterson. We start things off right 
by dressing comfortably in old clothes, jeans, shorts and some of the girls stick 
to dresses. Swimming period is a popular time, and requires an extra towel (and 
your bathing suit, of course). No linen is funished, so please don't forget to bring 
along your sheets and blankets and towel and wash cloth. Incidentally, if you are 
not used to sleeping without a pillow, you had better bring your own. 

We don't mean to sound barbaric, but we are not kidding when we say that we 
will be camping in the rough. The boys will not think so maybe, but I am sure it 
will be a new experience for many of the gals! No joke, it is really fun and I 
am sure you wouldn't want to miss it. 

I am looking forward to seeing all of my old friends again, and am anxious to 
meet the new campers. Until July 10th, when we will meet again at Patterson. 

Sincerely, 

Helen Thomas. 



Patterson Camp 



by 
Mark Jenkins, Director 



The Public Schools opened late last 
fall because of the polio epidemic, and 
therefore we find the schools in various 
parts of our Diocese closing one, two 
and some even three weeks later than 
in past years. When plans were laid 
for the Camp in a Youth Commission 
meeting in January we had to set a 
later date than usual for our week at 
Patterson. This later date should be 
better because we will be in Happy 
Valley in the middle of the hot months. 
Hot days are welcome when one has 
the cool waters of this valley to swim 
in. Vegetables fresh from the rich soils 
of Patterson School's gardens will stay 
our well-earned appetites. All in all, 
I cannot think of a better time to gather 
in this lovely part of God's world than 
the second full week of July — the 10th 
to the 16th. 

We all will have the opportunity of 
initiating Bishop Henry into the life of 
Patterson Camp. We will also have the 
privilege of having him as our Chaplain 
and as teacher for one class. 



Other classes will be taught by some 
who are familiar to campers of past 
years and by some who are new to our 
faculty. A completely reorganized pro- 
gram of recreation and entertainment 
is planned for this year. 

Worship, study, play and fellowship 
have been, are, and will be the reason 
for this Diocesan Camp. Is there any 
boy or girl who does not dream of an 
opportunity to join others in such a 
program? Here is the chance to make 
this dream come true! Join us the week 
of July 10-16 at Patterson Camp. 

In this issue of the Highland Church- 
man you will find a registration blank. 
Cut it out, fill it in, and mail it with 
one dollar registration fee to the Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, Fletcher, N. C. Do this 
at once, as our enrollment is limited by 
the dormitory space at Patterson. When 
your registration blank is received a 
letter will be mailed to you with all 
necessary information and directions. 

See you at Patterson Camp! 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL— IULY 10-16, 1949 

Name Age 

Address 

Parish or Mission 

Signature of Parent or Guardian 
I recommend the above named applicant to the Diocesan Camp. 

(Rector or Priest in Charge) 

Cut out this application and mail to the Rev. Mark Jenkins, Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, N. C, together with #1.00 registration fee. 



Youth Leaders And Advisors 



We hope that you will make use of the following list of Young People's Pres- 
idents and Advisors from the various groups in the Diocese. This list was recently 
obtained through a questionaire sent the clergy. If you are wondering what the 
other groups are doing or what success they are having in reaching new members 
and getting up programs, write to them and find out: 



PARISH 

Trinity, Asheville 
Transfiguration, 

Bat Cave 
All Soul's, Biltmore 
St. Philip's, Brevard 
Calvary, Fletcher 
Asecnsion, Hickory 

(Junior Group) 
St. Luke's, Lincolnton 
Grace, Morganton 

St. Mary's, 

Quaker Meadows 
Holy Cross, Tryon 



Grace, Waynesville 
Our Saviour, Woodside 
St. James', 
Hendersonville 



PRESIDENT 
Mr. Bill Russell 



Mr. William P. Holt 
Miss Fuller Chaffee 
Miss Diane Miller 
Miss Libby Huffman 
Mr. Wm. Whitener 
Mr. David Seagle 
Miss Florence Chaffee 



Mr. Paul Whisnant 



Miss Rosemary Britten 
Miss Patricia Peeler 

Miss Ernestine Medd 



ADULT ADVISOR 
Mrs. H. Kenneth Lee 
Mrs. Norman Greig 

Mrs. Carleton T. Smith 
Rev. H. Boyd Edwards, 
Mr. H. S. Miller 
Mr. Charles Bagby 
Miss Bobby Lee Kendale 
Rev. Richard Lee 
Mrs. Julia H. Wayt 
Mr. Henry E. Colton 

Mr. John Oxford 
Mr. Wm. M. Spivey 
Dr. R. A. Laslett Smith 
Mrs. Wm. T. Capers, Jr. 
Mrs. Edgar H. Goold 
Miss Mary W. Sumner 

Miss Mary Turner 
Miss Julia Fisher 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 

PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 



For catalogue address 



The Rev'd. 



P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



The 27th Annual Convention 
HIGHLIGHTS 



At the opening service in Grace 
Church there were over one hundred 
people present. With the exception of 
last year's convention when a bishop was 
to be elected, this was one of the largest 
convention gatherings in recent years. 

Bishop Henry introduced the new 
clergy and lay workers in the Diocese 
by saying that along with him they were 
the babies of the Diocese. Those who 
have come since the last Convention are 
the Rev. Richard J. Lee, now rector of 
St. Luke's, Lincolnton, Fr. Edwin Ross- 
maessler, chaplain at Christ School, and 
the Rev. Dr. William H. Anthony, priest 
in charge of Redeemer, Shelby and St. 
Andrews, Bessemer City. Two lay 
workers, Mr. William Bolton and Cap- 
tain George Graham, C. A., were in- 
troduced as additions to the work in the 
Southwest. Mr. Bolton is working at 
the Church of the Messiah, Murphy, 
while Graham has charge of the negro 
work in Franklin and Murphy. 

A report from the Department of 
Finance included the request for a spec- 
ial assessment to be levied this year in 
order to provide more funds for deputies 
to the General Convention. There was 
not a sufficient amount in the Diocesan 
Treasury to send men as far as San 
Francisco. In the resolution, which was 
passed, it was made clear that no penal- 
ty was attached to non-payment as 
there is if the regular assessment is not 
paid by a parish or mission. 

All delegates and many visitors were 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Stoney 
at a luncheon served at the Community 
House. The amount and good quality 
of the food made it rather difficult to the 
delegates to transact the afternoon busi- 
ness, for naps seemed highly desirable. 



The afternoon of the first day was 
devoted largely to reports from the chair- 
men of departments and committees. 
Following these reports, nominations for 
elected officers were received. 

When the Convention recessed, dele- 
gates and visitors were the invited guests 
of the State Hospital for a short tour 
followed by dinner. The new chaplain 
at the Hospital spoke on his work, not- 
ing that his appointment as chaplain 
was a new venture in the State's care 
for the mentally ill. 

At an evening service, Bishop Henry 
made his address to the Convention. 
This marked a change in the usual order 
where the Bishop's address was part of 
the first order of business. Excerpts 
from the Bishop's address are printed 
elsewhere in this issue. 

gfc 3|g 3]g gig j|g 

On the second day of the convention, 
Mr. Redwood was presented with a 
silver dish in token of the appreciation 
of the Diocese for his twenty-five year's 
service as Treasurer. He was re-elected 
by unanimous consent of the Conven- 
tion. 

The forward-looking temper of the 
meeting can be judged by the fact that 
a greatly enlarged budget was passed 
upon with no opposition. In fact, the 
only change made was to raise the 
amount paid to the Secretary of the 
Diocese. The budget calls for expend- 
itures of $28,407.00 and represents an 
increase of about $4,000.00 over last 
year's budget. 

***** 

When the dust had settled, it was 
found-that the following had been elec- 
ted: General Convention Deputies: 
Clerical; Rev. Messrs. Morgan, Leavell, 
Tuton, Jenkins. Lay; Messrs. Balthis, 



Receipts For Diocesan House And Endowment Fund 



House 

Asheville, 

St. Mary's 520.75 

Asheville, 

St. Matthias _ 17.00 

Asheville, 
Trinity __ .___ 6,773.39 

Biltmore, 

All Souls 3,835.95 

Brevard, 

St. Philip's ___ 125.00 
Gastonia, 

St. Mark's 300.00 

Hendersonville, 

St. James' 250.00 

Hickory, 

Ascension 24.76 

Lenoir, 

St. James' 148.00 

Marion, 

St. John's 125.00 

Morganton, 

Grace 4,632.25 

Rutherfordton, 

St. Francis 2,782.00 

Tryon. 

Holy Cross _ _ 2,180.32 
Waynesville, 

Grace 181.00 



April 26, 1949 






ndoivment 






Wilkesboro, 






St. Paul's 


143.50 




Arden, 






Christ School __ 


36.00 




Asheville, 






Redeemer 


5.00 




Asheville, 






Trinity Chapel 


10.00 




Black Mountain, 






St. James' 


500.00 




Boone, 






. „„„ St. Luke's 


1 80.00 




1,000.00 Franklin, 






St. Agnes 


50.00 




Highlands, 






Incarnation, 


106.10 




Hot Springs, 






St. John's 


40.00 




Ledgerwood, 






Chapel of Rest_ 


90.00 




Morganton, 






St. Stephen's 


9.30 




Penland, 






Good Shepherd 


50.00 




Saluda, 






Transforation 


5.00 




A Friend 




50.00 



23,120.32 1,050.00 



Brown, Stoney, Blanton. Standing Com- 
mittee: Clerical; Rev. Messrs. Tuton, 
Leavell, Jenkins, Burke. Lay; Messrs. 
Balthis, Stoney, Redwood, Hartshorn. 
Executive Council: Clerical; Rev. 
Messrs. Campbell and Morgan. Lay; 
Messrs. Balthis and Dawson. 



Despite the violent opposition put up 
by himself, The Rev. J. P. Burke was 
re-elected Secretary of the Diocese by 
overwhelming consent. He has served 
19 years. 



YOUTH NEWS 



As a result of cards sent to all the 
clergy of the Diocese, we have quite a 
bit of news to report from the various 
youth groups. 

ST. JOHN'S, MARION 

As yet, there is no young people's 
organization in St. John's Parish. There 
is, however, an up and coming group 
which will soon be organized. (The 
best of luck to this new group, and if 
we can be of any help in getting organ- 
ized, I am sure all the young people will 
be glad to lend a hand.) 

TRINITY, ASHEVILLE 

Our group was disappointed several 
weeks ago when a very bad rainstorm 
prevented us from going on a hayride 
which we had planned. We still intend 
to have it, however, and we did enjoy 
having our food cooked in the parish 
house instead. For the past six weeks. 



We are having discussions and outside 
speakers, such as a recent program on 
programs have been exceptionally good. 
"Getting over feelings of Inferiority", 
and discussions on hobbies, crafts, etc., 
in regard to vocations. 

The Sunday School was well repre- 
sented at the Mite Box Presentation 
Service at Calvary Church, Fletcher, on 
the second Sunday in May. On Youth 
Sunday there was a Corporate Commun- 
ion service, followed by a delicious 
breakfast. Twenty-four of our group 
were here for this service. 

The Junior Altar Guild meets the 
Saturday before the first Sunday in the 
month and does an excellent job of 
polishing the Altar brass. 

CALVARY, FLETCHER 

The Young Churchman's Club of 
Calvary Church lost many of its active 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy who wish to 
supplement the protection for their families given by the Pension Fund, 
and to .lay officials and active lay workers of the Church, either volun- 
tary or paid, and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



members this past year. Some entered 
the armed services, some are away at 
college and still others are working away 
from home. But the ranks did not 
remain depleted long. Out of the thirty- 
two confirmed in the middle of Lent, 
twenty-six were young people, all of 
whom came into the club and are now 
taking an active part in its work. 

The Choir of Calvary Church is com- 
posed entirely of young people, and 
they help to make the service more 
beautiful by taking part in the musical 
life of the parish all year round. 

Because of the need for social life 
amoung the boys and girls of the com- 
munity, square dances, parties, picnicks 
and game fests are carried on regularly. 
The educational side is taken care of 
by talks and films on religious and ed- 
ucational subjects. 

On May 15th, we observed Youth 
Sunday by attending a Corporate Com- 
munion Service, followed by breakfast. 
Officers for the coming year were also 
elected at this time. 

ALL SOULS, BILTMORE 

All Souls Church has a considerably 
enlarged Youth program now that the 
Parish House has been completely ren- 
ovated and is very useful for the meet- 
ings of all kinds of groups. An Acolyte 
Group, which is under the personal 
direction of the Rector, assisted by Mrs. 
G. Lyle Jones; the members of the so- 
called Younger Congregation, which in- 
cludes married couples and also single 
folk in their 20's and 30's meet once a 
month for supper and a program, and 
the Young People's Fun Night, goes to 
show us that fun can be had by all — 
even in Church. Mr. William P. Holt 
is Chairman of the youth group. 
ST. MARY'S, ASHEVILLE 

Thirty-seven of the Sunday School 
children from St. Mary's Church were 
present for the Lenten Mite-Box pres- 
entation at Calvary Church. Fletcher, 
the second Sunday in May. The young 
people's group was badly interrupted by 
the polio epidemic last summer, but is 
now well on the way up. Father Webb 
plans to take the group to Mills River 
for an all day picnic in July, at which 



time he will introduce to them his plans 
for revival of organized young people's 
activities. On May 22, at 4:00 P. M., 
the second annual Acolytes' Festival of 
the Diocese was held at St. Mary's, 
at which time the Rev. Charles G. 
Leavell, Rector of Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton, was the preacher, and Christ 
School Choir led the singing. 

One of the St. Mary's young people, 
Miss Grace Blackmore, played the organ 
at all the Wednesday night Lenten Serv- 
ices this year. 
GRACE CHURCH, WAYNESVILLE 

The Young People's Service League 
of Grace Church in-the-Mountains, 
Waynesville, was organized last fall. At 
present there are fourteen members. 
The officers are as follows: President, 
Rosemary Britten, Vice President, Peter 
Dock, Secretary, Mary Osborne, Treas- 
urer, Mary Michal, Advisor, Mrs. Ed- 
gar Goold. Meetings are held every 
two weeks, on Sunday evenings, either 
at the Rectory, in the Parish house or 
at the home of one of the members. 
After a program of devotions and dis- 
cussion, light refreshments are served. 
The group has been studying a booklet, 
"Talks on the Episcopal Church" by 
Canon Averill, also the work of Albert 
Schweitzer in Africa. Members of the 
group use the "Rule of Life" and sub- 
scribe to the Youth Edition of Forward 
Day by Day. A number of them sing 
in the choir and help in the Church 
School, especially in the music and in 
looking out for the younger children. 

One of the projects of the group was 
to paint the small chairs and table used 
by the Primary Grade of the Church 
School. Several members are planning 
to attend the Kanuga or Patterson 
Camps. 

ST. ANDREWS, BESSEMER CITY 

The Service League of St. Andrews is 
resuming activity under the leadership 
of Bill Harmon. On Sunday, May 15, 
Dr. William Anthony, the new Rector, 
conducted a youth service, to which the 
whole congregation was invited. The 
service projects in which the members 
are engaged consist of singing in the 
regular church choir, teaching in the 



Church School, acting as assistant 
Superintendent of the Church School, 
playing the piano, caring for and im- 
proving church grounds and church 
furnishings and helping with transpor- 
tation to church services. This group 
is looking forward to attending Camp 
Patterson again this year. 
APPALACHIAN SCHOOL, PENLAND 

Although there are no young people 
over twelve years of age at Appalachian 
School, they still keep up with the 
Church life. An acolyte group and choir 
function regularly, and for chief festivals 
they sing the whole service. Five of the 
older ones went to the Presentation 
service at St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows, 
on April 24, and sent $33.00 toward the 
Mite Box offering from their group. 

CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION, 
HICKORY 

The young people of Ascension 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

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Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



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Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

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18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



Church, Hickory, are divided into two 
groups, a Senior and Junior group. The 
two groups meet for supper every Sun- 
day evening at the Rectory, following 
which the groups meet for a program, 
consisting of devotions, a study of some 
topic, and games. During Lent they 
studied China and the Book of Common 
Prayer. During the year the various 
members take part of the program. 

As their project for this year, the 
groups have taken on the job of furnish- 
ing the Rector's study in the new church. 
Thus far, they have raised three hund- 
red dollars. They gave $29.00 to mis- 
sions last year, and at a recent meeting 
of the Woman's Auxiliary the Young 
People presented the program. 

ST. JAMES, HENDERSONVILLE 

The Young Churchmen of St. James, 
Hendersonville, have recently reorgan- 
ized and now have a rapidly growing 
group, the ages from 11 to 20. The 
officers elected are: Ernestine Medd, 
President, Arthur Shepherd, Vice- 
President, Nancy Sterling, Secretary and 
Treasurer. The adult advisors for this 
group are Miss Julia Fisher and Miss 
Mary Turner. 

Meetings are held every Sunday eve- 
ning, opening with the evening service 
at 5:30. Two of the young people take 
part in this service each week. A light 
supper is served by the St. James Volun- 
teer group, after which the business 
meeting and program follow. A recre- 
ation program consisting of ping-pong, 
games and quizes concludes the program. 

On Youth Sunday the Young Church- 
men had their Corporate Communion 
at the 11 o'clock service. The group has 
as their main projects the Junior Choir, 
and also, learning how they can be of 
service to the Church as a group or in- 
dividually. They all hope to be at Camp 
Patterson this year and are looking for- 
ward to it. 

HOLY CROSS, TRYON 

Holy Cross Church, Tryon, organized 
a Junior GFS branch in November and 
now has twenty most active members. 
In February the girls gave an excellent 
performance of a Chinese missionary 
play for the regular meeting of the Wo- 



10 



man's Auxiliary; the outcome of this was 
that they gained a number of Sponsors 
from among the women. 

On the first Friday in Lent fourteen 
of the girls formed a Youth Verse Chorus 
and took part in the World Day of 
Prayer Service conducted by Tryon 
Council of Church Women. Two GFS- 
ers took up the offering at this service. 

On Friday, May 6th GFS had a Once 
Upon A Time Exhibit in the Parish 
House for which they charged admission. 
Antique dolls, books and toys were ex- 
hibited, the girls modelled old time 
dresses, sang songs and did skits. The 
general reaction of the audience was that 
they should repeat the performance and 
charge more for admission. 

GFS supports a missionary who teach- 
es English in a college in China and also 
organizes GFS branches. Most of the 
$50 raised by the Exhibit will be sent 
to help on this GFS Mission Object. 

The Church of the Holy Cross is very 
proud of the six month's record of ac- 
complishment of these young girls. 



Compliments 



Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 




TAIWAN 

OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



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Episcopal. School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of" Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



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11 



Mrs* B # P^ Holnes, 
15 Ed^emont Rd», 
Asheville, N* C* 

GUILD PUBLISHES COOK BOOK 

The Rector's Guild of Grace Church 
in-the-Mountains, voted in May 1947 
to publish a cook book of favorite 
cipes of its members. 

The book in its entirety is hand-done 
and photographed. Stephens Press of 
Asheville handled the lithography. This 
book was received from the printer the 
first of August and sold so well that the 
printer's bill of almost $300 was com- 
letely paid within two months. Since 
that time the Rector's Guild has cleared 
over $300 on this project. Copies of 
The Rector's Guild Cook Book may be 
obtained by writing The Rector's Guild, 
Box 765, Waynesville, N. C. Copies 
are $1.00 each. 



Order Your Copy Today 

RECTOR'S GUILD COOK BC^T 

Favorite recipes oi members Grace 
Church In-the-Mountains, Waynesville, 
N. C $1.00 Prepaid. 




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Waynesville, N. C. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville. N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girl 6 owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 











The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XX 



SEPTEMBER, 1949 



No. 2 



:wm~-~ rm 




Church of The Ascension 
Hickory, North Carolina 



St}? Iftgtjlani* 
(ttljurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19. 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3. 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville. N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest. Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mer. 



Religion 

Once upon a time, Satan asked his 
helpers to propose ways and means of 
breaking up a revival meeting on earth. 

One said: "I would tell the people 
that there is no God, no devil, no 
heaven, no hell, and that they should 
eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow 
we die." 

"You need not go." said Satan. "No 
one would believe you." 

Another imp, shrewder, said: "Let 
me go and tell them that the Bible is 
a good book, but that it is only partiallv 
true. I would tell them there is a God 
and a heaven, but no devil and no hell; 
that no matter how they live they will 
be eternally happy." 

But Satan said: "Only a minority 
would believe that." 

Finally the shrewdest imp said: "I 
would tell them the Bible is all true, 
that they must make a choice between 
God and Satan, but there is no hurry." 

"Go," said Satan. "You have the 
system." 

— Christian Action. 



Report of W. N. C. 
Committee on Boundaries 

In January a committee from the 
Diocese met with similar committees in 
the other two dioceses in the state for 
a discussion of the possibility of changes 
in the present diocesan boundaries. The 
report of the W. N. C. committee was 
presented at that time and was publish- 
ed in the July issue of East Carolina's 
diocesan paper, "The Mission Herald." 
Reprinted below is the report as it ap- 
peared in that issue. 

Although the claims of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina for cession of 
territory from the Diocese of North 
Carolina may not in the historical sense 
be as real as those of East Carolina, 
they nevertheless are quite as sound 
from the practical point of view. It is 
manifest that W. N. C. is the weakest 
of the three Dioceses within the State 
of N. C. It was founded as a mission- 
ary district in 1895 and composed large- 
ly of that portion of the State not want- 
ed by its Mother Diocese. For some 
t ; me it was a missionary field of the 
General Church. It still has within its 
borders perhaps the greatest missionary 
challenge and opportunity of any sec- 
r'on within the State. It became a 
Diocese in 1922, but has never been 
strong enough to meet its obligations 
adequately. Although it recently has 
come to the status of self-support, it has 
done so under strict limitations such as 
we believe do not exist within the other 
two Dioceses of the State. 

We do not think it presumption on 
our part to ask our Mother Diocese to 
give us aid which she is able now to 
give. We want her to be proud of her 
child, and to give her the opportunity 
to go forward beside her and grow on 
equal terms. We therefore respectfully 
request that necessary steps be taken 
for a vote as to cession of the counties 
of Mecklenburg, Iredell, Yadkin, and 
Surry. This would obviously give W. 
N. C. (the weakest Diocese, we again 
remind you) the largest City in the 



State along with three contiguous coun- 
ties similar to much of W. X. C. We 
offer through this proposal, coupled per- 
haps with the possible cession of eastern 
counties asked for by East Carolina, a 
plan to give us three strong Dioceses 
within our State and also ample Epis- 
copal supervision without the necessity 
for a coadjutor in any one of the three. 
We believe contacts between the coun- 
ties we ask for and our present Diocese 
would be mutually beneficial, cordial, 



and natural. 

The cession for which we ask would 
mean addition to W. N. C, and conse- 
quent loss to N. C. of 2,824 communi- 
cants, 8 clergy, 14 parishes and missions, 
$16,308.32 in missionary giving, $3,- 
180.11 in support of the Episcopate, and 
total receipts of $141,677.83. For the 
moment assuming this cession and also 
the cession asked for by East Carolina, 
comparative statistics of the three Dio- 
ceses would be: 





North 
Carolina 


East 
Carolina 


Western N. 
Carolina 


Communicants 


10,465 


11,530 


7,653 


Clergy 


51 


53 


40 


Receipts Church's Program 


$41,744.66 


$99,695.78* 


$27,522.56 


Receipts for Episcopate 


$10,128.21 


$6,531.96 


$7,510.30 


Total Receipts 


$595,491,92** 


$335,733.21** 


$370,565.54 



* Includes $5,954.93 Reconstruction and Advance Fund in E. C. Journal, around $12,000.01) 
Episcopal maintenance carried under a lumping of receipts, other items such as $3,500.00 Good 
Shepherd Hospital. 

** Does not include shift of receipts from N. C. to E. C. in proposed territory to be ceded E. C; 
suggest this be done by somebody knowing this territory better! The only financial missionary 
"liability" we find in the four counties we ask for is $638.06 to Rector of Trinity, Statesville, for 
work at St. James', Iredell County. 



Whatever the outcome of these con- 
versations may be, it is the intention of 
our delegation to go home and work 
harder for the advancement of Christ's 
Kingdom within that portion of His 
vineyard committed to us. We honestly 
believe the work of the Church would 
be furthered and benefitted by the ces- 
sion we purpose not only in W. N. C, 
but also in the entire three Dioceses. In 
any event we are ready to work with 
whatever we have, believing it is God- 
given. We believe that by God's grace 
the Church is going forward throughout 
North Carolina as a whole, and more 
especially the Western portion wherein 
it is our privilege to labor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. G. Leavell, Secy. W. N. C. 

"Borderline Committee." 



CHURCH MAY CHANGE NAME 

Toronto — A proposal that the Church 
of England in Canada change its name 
is being considered by the Church's 
General Synod meeting in Halifax. The 
proposal is supported by the Rt. Rev. 
William T. Hallam, Bishop of Saska- 
toon, who declared that "our present 
title has led to misunderstanding both 
in England and Canada. Among sug- 
gested new names Bishop Hallam said, 
were "Anglican Church of Canada, 
Catholic Church of Canada, and Epis- 
copal Church of Canada." 



3 



Received By The Diocese of Western North 

Carolina From Parishes and Missions 

January 1st, 1949, to July 27th, 1949 

On Assessment Fur On Quota For Support Oj 
Support Oj The Diocese Program Of The Church- 
Made Paid PARISHES Accepted Paid 

$1,315.00 $ 600.00 Asheville, Trinity $ 2,510.00 $ 2,144.92 

322.00 234.55 Asheville, St. Mary's 615.00 651.08 

109.00 50.00 Asheville, St. Matthias' 208.00 117.23 

1,170.00 487.50 Biltmore, All Souls' 2,232.00 1,020.18 

219.00 219.00 Brevard. St. Philip's 417.00 194.33 

130.00 130.00 Flat Rock, St John's 250.00 250.00 

398.00 199.02 Fletcher, Calvary 759.00 553.65 

410.00 205.02 Gastonia, St. Mark's 775.00 479.00 

370.00 135.00 Hendersonville, St. lames' 707.00 379.12 

334.00 62.65 Hickory. Ascension 637.00 234.32 

253.00 105.40 Lenoir, St. James' 482.00 252.31 

216.00 54.00 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 412.00 131.50 

234.00 134.00 Marion. St. John's 445.00 175.25 

580.00 580.00 Morganton, Grace 1,346.00 747.00 

358.00 Rutherfordton, St. Francis' 684.00 16.00 

729.00 425.25 Tryon, Holy Cross 1,391.00 811.50 

170.00 125.00 Waynesville, Grace 323.00 165.00 

103.00 51.50 Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 196.00 98.00 



27,420.00 23,862.89 TOTAL $14,389.00 $ 8,420.39 



MISSIONS 

68.00 34.00 Arden, Christ School 85.00 42.00 

89.00 Asheville, The Redeemer 110.00 6.53 

36.00 29.00 Asheville, St. Luke's 68.00 51.00 

31.00 31.00 Asheville, Trinity Chapel 60.00 38.50 

30.00 30.00 Bat Cave, Transfiguration 57.00 57.00 

10.00 Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 12.00 

34.00 39.00 Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 47.00 24.46 

117.00 Black Mountain, St. James 224.00 10.40 

30.00 Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. 37.00 

48.00 48.00 Boone, St. Luke's 99.00 99.00 

114.00 114.00 Canton. St. Andrew's 218.00 228.00 

10.00 Cullowhee, St. David's 12.00 

19.00 Edneyville, St. Paul's 36.00 20.53 

98.00 48.00 Franklin, St. Agnes 183.00 108.94 

110.00 6.50 Franklin, St. Cyprian's 12.00 23.64 

10.00 10.00 Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 17.00 21.73 

13.00 Glendale Springs, Holy Trinity 12.00 

10.00 10.00 High Shoals, St. John's 12.00 12.00 

80.00 80.00 Highlands, Incarnation 154.00 154.00 

10.00 10.00 Hot Springs, St. John's 12.00 12.00 

20.00 20.00 Legerwood. Chapel of Rest 80.00 80.00 

10.00 10.00 Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 12.00 12.00 

26.00 26.00 Lincoln, Woodside, Our Saviour 49.00 25.00 

20.00 Little Switzerland, Resurrection 

12.00 Morganton, St. Mary's 60.00 19.03 

12.00 Morganton, St. Stephen's 12.00 8.87 

23.00 23.00 Murphy, Messiah 44.00 44.00 

41.00 41.00 Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 79.00 

10.00 Saluda, Transfiguration 35.00 

95.00 95.00 Shelby, The Redeemer 182.00 101.54 

22.00 Sylva, St. John's 42.00 

10.00 Todd, St. Matthew's 12.00 12.00 

67.00 52.25 Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 134.00 95.87 

24.00 Asheville, Grace 46.00 5.46 

10.00 Cashiers, Good Shepherd 10.00 

10.00 10.00 Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 12.00 12.00 

8.00 Linville, Al Saints 12.00 12.00 

22.00 22.00 Penand, Good Shepherd 42.00 75.61 

10.00 Rutherfordton Missions 

12.00 Tryon, Good Shepherd 12.00 

Upward, St. John Baptist 60.00 8.75 



$ 786.75 TOTAL $ 2,402.00 

$4,649.64 GRAND TOTAL $16,791.00 



The Great Thanksgiving 

Bv The Rev. R. E. Gribbin 



Although the world Holy Eucharist 
is employed only once in the Prayer 
Book (first rubric page 574) as a name 
for the service Christ instituted in the 
night in which He was betrayed, it is 
used more than any other term for that 
service except the "Holy Communion". 
Eucharist is a Greek work meaning 
Thanksgiving. Since the Catechism sets 
forth as one of the requirements for 
coming to the Lord's Supper "a thank- 
ful remembrance of his (Christ's) 
death", it is easily understood why so 
often the thanksgiving character of the 
Holy Communion is stressed, and why 
this ancient name for the service is so 
frequently used. 

Perhaps at one time the thought up- 
permost in the mind and heart of the 
communicant is that of spiritual hunger 
coming to have that hunger satisfied; 
another time desire for fellowship with 
God and man might be the special in- 
tention; and at another occasion he may 
wish to open his heart in thanksgiving 
to God for what He has done in Christ. 
The General Thanksgiving states that 
"above all" we are to thank God "for 
thine inestimable love in the redemption 
of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ; 
for the means of grace, and for the hope 
of glory". 

Many who have made a careful 
stud}' of the history of Christian wor- 
ship and how the theology of the Church 
has been incorporated into the liturgy 
(and has not in some instances) feel 
that in the Eucharist it is improper to 
place so much emphasis upon the Pas- 
sion and the Atonement of Christ to the 
exclusion almost of the memorial of the 
other acts included in the Incarnation. 
In fact, to the writer, the offering of 
the Eucharist should include Thanks- 
giving for the entire work of the Trinity 
—Creation, Redemption and Sanctifica- 



tion. The thought might well be ex- 
pressed in the Obsecrations (second and 
third petitions in the Litany on page 55, 
beginning with "By"). Instead of say- 
ing, or thinking to himself "By" as in 
the Litany the worshipper could substi- 
tute "For" and respond "We thank 
thee, O Lord." The earliest known text 
or the fixed part of the Eucharist (found 
in the Apostolic Tradition of Hippoly- 
tus, about the year 217) shows thanks- 
giving for the whole ministry of Christ, 
including the invocation of the Holy 
Spirit. 

The candles at each end of the altar 
are called "Eucharistic candles" because 
ordinarily they are lighted only at a 
celebration of the Eucharist. They re- 
mind us of the Light of the World. They 
should remind us too of the test of 
thanksgiving is in "thanksliving"; that 
it is not alone with our lips how we 
show our gratitude to God for his great 
gifts to men. The way we use our gifts, 
material and spiritual, is the best indi- 
cation of our thanksgiving. Let our 
light so shine before men by consecrat- 
ing God's gifts to vis to his honor and 
glory. Let us lift up our hearts. Let 
us give thanks. 



SERVICES HELD REGULARLY 
IN SALUDA 

Services were held each Sunday at 
The Transfiguration, Saluda, during the 
summer months. Messrs. Allen Jones 
and Gordon Thomas, lay readers, aided 
by the Rev. Lawrence Harkness, served 
through June. During the whole month 
of July, the Rev. Allen Clarkson, rector 
of Good Shepherd Church, Augusta, 
Georgia, was in charge of services. In 
August the Rev. C. E. B... Robinson of 
York, S. C, had charge of some of the 
services. 



5 



The Ideal Layman 

By a Priest 



"T'ain't necessarily so!" seems a good 
way to start such an article. The ideal 
layman is not necessarily the largest 
Contributor to the budget. He is not 
necessarily the most active man in the 
parish. He is not necessarily in attend- 
ance at every service. He is very likely 
to be all three of these, but, in that case, 
it is because he is the ideal layman and 
not that he has become ideal through 
these things. 

The ideal layman is one who has dis- 
covered the profound truth that Holy 
Church is his mother. He looks to 
Mother Church for all those things that 
a child needs: love, nourishment, dis- 
cipline, advice, forgiveness, solace, 
strength, encouragement. He is not 
"goody-goody," but errs daily as any 
normal child errs with the full know- 
ledge that, though mother may scold, 



she will forgive and love. He accepts 
discipline and even punishment from 
Mother Church like an erring child, re- 
sentful at first, but finally loving Her, 
because She is his Mother. 

In actual practice a not-too-pious in- 
dividual would not more stay away from 
the Eucharist on Sunday than he would 
miss a regular meal at home; who would 
no more think of remaining away from 
the Church because he had sinned, than 
he would think of leaving his mother 
and father because of some wrong he 
had done them; who would no more 
think of not supporting the church, than 
he would think of leaving his own moth- 
er and father starving and destitute. 

That is the ideal layman! The man 
who treats the church in every way as 
an average man treats the best possible 
mother. 

— The Diocesan Bulletin. 



Figures Show Serious 
Clergy Shortage 

In 87 dioceses of the Church there 
are 1,023 openings for clergy which 
cannot be filled, according to statistics 
recently compiled by the Rev. Joseph 
Fletcher of the Episcopal Theological 
School. 

His report says that the current trend 
indicates that 2,141 clergymen will be 
needed in these dioceses during the next 
five years but present facilities and ap- 
plication will not produce more than 
1,000 trained clergymen during the same 
period. 

Part of the reason for the clergy 
shortage, Dr. Fletcher says, lies in the 
fact that the average salary for the Epis- 
copal clergy equals that of a bus driver, 
and that the retirement pension for 
clergy averages less than the payments 
made by the Government to the aged 
poor. 



ST. GABRIEL'S LEAGUE MEETING 
WITH SUCCESS 

The young peoples group which has 
been recently formed at St. Gabriel's 
Church, Rutherfordton, is being very 
well attended. Interest seems to be 
running high in all activities of the 
League. It is expected that four of the 
young people will be confirmed soon. 

During August a Bible School was 
conducted by Bishop Gribbin who had 
been supplying St. Francis' Church dur- 
ing the summer. 



UTO OFFERING ON WAY UP 

In 1946 the women of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina gave #10,000 
as their United Thank Offering. This 
high figure will be well surpassed when 
the Fall ingathering report is made, for 
already there is on hand #10,297.60 
which has been given in the last trien- 
nium. 



Students From Valle Crucis Work In The Diocese 

By Rev. E. D. Butt 



A good rule, it is said, works both 
ways, and this precept has been dem- 
onstrated this summer in connection 
with the students of the Southern Rural 
Church Institute at Valle Crucis. The 
Diocese of Western North Carolina 
provides a place and much of the re- 
sources for the operation of the Insti- 
tute, and in return the majority of the 
students work in the Diocese for a good 
part of the summer. After the three- 
week period of instruction, the students 
are sent to do their field work under 
some priest working in the town-country 
field for a period of seven weeks. This 
year fifteen of the twenty-four students 
were assigned work in Western North 
Carolina, and the results of their efforts 
have been most gratifying. 

In their field work the students enter 
into all the activities of a rural parish 
under the direction of the clergyman 
under whom they are placed. Their 
work includes holding services, preach- 
ing, pastoral visitations, survey of the 
field, church school work, choir work, 
youth work, assisting in preaching mis- 
sions, community recreation, holding 
daily vacation church schools, visiting in 
hospitals and other institutions, using 
audio-visual aids, publicity work, meet- 
ing with church organizations, speaking 
over the radio, social service work, and 
manual labor on church buildings and 
grounds. This year students were as- 
signed as follows: to the Rev. W. C. 
Leach for the Valle Crucis field, four 
students, and one student for Boone and 
Beaver Creek; to Mr. Wiese for work 
in Happy Valley, two students, one of 
whom also held services in Wilkesboro; 
to Mr. Lackey at Lenoir, one student; 
to Mr. Leavell for Morganton. Quaker 
Meadows and St. Paul's Church, Burke 
County, three students; and to the Rev. 
Rufus Morgan for work in his field, 
four students, one for Sylva, one for 



Murphy, and two for Cherokee and 
Cartoogachey. 

In the Valle Crucis field services were 
held at Valle Crucis, Banner Elk and 
St. John's Church on the Watauga Riv- 
er. Vacation Schools were held at Valle 
Crucis and at St. John's. At Boone 
services were held regularly and work 
done among the college students at the 
state teachers' college there. There were 
baptisms. A confirmation class was 
presented. Students assisted in finish- 
ing the quanset hut parish hall, and in 
painting St. John's Church. 

In Happy Valley the students assisted 
with the Diocesan youth camp, held a 
bible school at the Buffalo Negro 
Church, and held services regularly at 
the Chapel of Rest. Services were held 
regularly in Wilkesboro, and pastoral 
calling done there. 

At Lenoir the student helped to or- 
ganize the Vacation School, held services 
during August while the Rector was 
on vacation, and spoke for a week on the 
family devotional hour on the radio. 

At Morganton Vacation Schools were 
held at Grace Church, Negro Church 
and at Quaker Meadows. Chapel ser- 
vices were held at the local hospital. 

In the Franklin field, the student at 
Sylva organized and presented a class 
for confirmation, under the direction of 
Mr. Morgan. Bible schools were held 
at Cherokee and Cartoogachey. At 
Murphy the student working with the 
resident student of the diocese made 
quite a few improvements on the build- 
ing and ground, as well as the other 
work. 

While making their contribution to 
the life of the Diocese, the students gain 
a great deal of insight into the life and 
work of the town or country church. It 
is hoped that through this means many 
will in the future give of their time and 
talents in working in the town-country 
field of the Church. 



Save When You Build 

New York, N. Y. — Now that building 
materials are available again, the need 
for additional Episcopal churches, and 
improvements to existing ones, is re- 
ceiving attention all over the country. 
A great deal of money is necessary for 
this construction work, and in many in- 
stances the finances of individual con- 
gregations are being taxed to the utmost. 
Consequently, such work should be 
done in a manner which will result in a 
minimum of expense for future upkeep. 

When new buildings are erected, or 
existing ones effect major alterations, 
new fire insurance rates must be pub- 
lished by local rating organizations. 
The gentlemen employed by these bu- 
reaus are authorities on what local re- 
quirements exist, and are usually glad 
to help an assured review plans for con- 
struction work, and to offer suggestions 
on how the work should be done to pro- 
duce the lowest possible rate. It is 
wise, therefore, for churches who are in 
this position to present their plans to 
the rating authorities, and to discuss 
their problems with them. Such discus- 
sions may result in minor changes in 
original plans which will produce a sub- 
stantial saving in the future fire insur- 
ance rate. 

After a building has been completed, 
it is often costly to correct conditions 
which do not meet with the approval of 
the rating board, but if the requirements 
of the board are met in the original 
plans, then expense is cut to a minimum. 
as well as the cost of the insurance. 

After you have obtained the best 
tariff rate possible, it would be well for 
you to consult The Church Fire Insur- 
ance Corporation, 20 Exchange Place, 
New York 5, N. Y., for they will grant 
you protection at the five-year published 
rate (which is the cheapest term rate — 
usually four times the annual cost), and 
permit you to pay premiums in quar- 
terly installments without additional 
charge. In addition, in most States, 
their rates will show a substantial sav- 
ing below tariff. 



This Corporation is owned by The 
Church Pensoin Fund, and all profits 
accrue to the benefit of the Fund. 



Report Compares Church 
School Figures 

The Methodist Church ranks first in 
numbers of church schools and officers 
and teachers and number of pupils, ac- 
cording to statistics just released by the 
International Council of Religious Edu- 
cation. 

The Episcopal Church ranks sixth 
in church membership with 2,160.277 
members, according to the statistics. It 
ranks 10th in the number of church 
schools, 12th in the number of officers 
and teachers and 13th in the number 
of pupils. 

The figures show that the Episcopal 
Church has 4,851 church schools, 51,455 
officers and teachers, and 423,873 pupils. 
The Methodist Church, with 8,567,772 
members, has 4,871,983 pupils. 



BISHOP FLIES PLANE 

Fairbanks, Alaska — The Bishop of 
the Episcopal Missionary District of 
Alaska, the Rt. Rev. William J. Gordon, 
Jr., will make his long-distance visita- 
tions by airplane in the future. The 
Bishop has acquired a small Piper Super 
Cruiser plane and has learned to fly it. 
He will be the only Bishop of this 
Church to fly his own plane on official 
visitations. 

Bishop Gordon commented that ''one 
is called upon to learn a good many 
things when serving the Church in 
Alaska.' 1 When he came to Alaska six 
years ago he had never seen a dogteam. 
Since then he has covered some 6.000 
miles by dog sled, during five Arctic- 
winters. He said too, that he found 
that to visit river missions it was neces- 
sary to use a launch, so he learned to 
operate the boat, "Godspeed," covering 
3400 miles on visitations last summer. 



8 



Survey Of Church 
Planned 

A survey of the Episcopal Church in 
North Carolina is being made by W. S. 
Powell of the State Department of 
Archives and History, Raleigh. Ques- 
tionaires are being sent to the clergy of 
all parishes now active in the State as 
well as to persons known to have in 
their custody records of inactive church- 
es. 

As a result of this survey a report will 
be prepared showing the present con- 
dition of the records of our Church and 
advising those interested just what re- 
cords exist for each parish. When such 
a record has been made the next logical 
step will be the preparation of a detailed 
history of the Church in North Caro- 
lina. It will be appreciated if informa- 
tion pertaining to inactive parishes can 
be forwarded to Mr. Powell so that 
these records can be established. 




W . Ted Gannaivay, Charleston, S. C, 
business man, who will give several 
months to the work of training laymen 
to forward the work of the Episcopal 
Church by means of information and 
education. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr., O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



General Convention 
Advance 

Proposed program plans for seizure 
of new opportunities in overseas mis- 
sionary areas — stress on Evangelism at 
home — enlargement of work in Christian 
Education and Social Relations. 

Convention meets in San Francisco 
September 26-October 7. 

This is the supreme legislative body 
of the Church, meeting like the Con- 
gress of the United States, in two Hous- 
es. Legislation must be approved by 
both Houses before becoming the law 
of the Church. San Francisco's second 
General Convention will coincide with 
the Centenary of the Days of '49, and 
the 100th anniversary of the founding 
of the first Episcopal parish on the 
Coast, Trinity, San Francisco. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



Meeting concurrently with the Gen- 
eral Convention in the Triennial Meet- 
ing of the Woman's Auxiliary, and dur- 
ing the Convention period, there is to 
be a Youth Convention, and a Laymen's 
Weekend under the auspices of the 
Presiding Bishop's Committee on Lay- 
men's Work, of which Harvey Firestone, 
Jr., is Chairman. 

The great opening service of the Con- 
vention, which previously has been at- 
tended by as many as 25,000 people, is 
to be in the Civic Auditorium, San Fran- 
cisco, on Monday, September 26, at 
10:30 A. M. The opening part of the 
service will be by the Rt. Rev. E. A. 
Penick, Bishop of North Carolina and 
vice-chairman of the House of Bishops. 
The Lessons will be read by the Secre- 
taries of the two Houses, a traditional 
custom. The Rev. C. Rankin Barnes 
of New York, formerly rector of St. 
Paul's Church, San Diego, Calif, is Sec- 
retary of the House of Deputies, the 
Rev. John H. Fitzgerald of Brooklyn, 
is Secretary of the House of Bishops. 
The sermon will be preached by Presid- 
ing Bishop Henry Knox Sherrill, and 
the closing part of the service and the 
Benediction will be by the former Pre- 
siding Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Henry St. 
George Tucker. 

Expected guests at the Opening Ser- 
vice are the Archbishop of York, the 
Supreme Bishop of the Philippine In- 
dependent Church, the Presiding Bishop 
of the Nippon Sei Ko Kwei (Holy 
Catholic Church) of Japan, the Primate 
of All Canada, and others. 

The business sessions of the Conven- 
tion will transact a great deal of routine 
business, hear and act upon many re- 
ports. Attention will be given to the 
Church Pension Fund, aiming at devel- 
opment of plans whereby pensions for 
retired clergymen and their widows may 
be put more in line with present living 
costs. Another major subject will be 
Christian Education, for which a greatly 
increased budget will be proposed. This 
leads to consideration of the whole 
budget of the Church's National Coun- 



10 



cil, which will be much larger than pre- 
viously presented to the Convention, in 
view of the many opportunities at home 
;:nd abroad for effective Christian work 
and service. 

Another pressing subject is the short- 
age of clergy in the Episcopal Church, 
and the support and expansion of theo- 
logical seminaries. 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

OUR MAGAZINE 

POSSIBLE 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore. N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



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(?0m HIGHEST • SKILLED ■ CRAFTSMANSHIP ?T#Ti 



FiT i f if win W m VitlSliftMn 



The Rrtterson Scftool 




ahkx ~Sla\k&£ 



Episcopal, School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt . 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs* B # P„ Holnes, I 
15 Edgemont Rd*, 
Asheville, N # C«» 




Young people find life today so stren- 
uous that they want to lie in bed on 
Sunday morning when they should be 
in Church and Church School. 



Order Your Copy Today' 

RECTOR'S GUILD COOK BOOK 

Favorite recipes of members Grace 
Church In-the-Mountains, Waynesville. 
N. C $1.00 Prepaid. 

Box 765 Waynesville, N. C. 



SAINT l|lARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



Year In and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

AshevUle, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 
An Zpiscopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

1 1 th, 1 2th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
-indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XX 



OCTOBER, 1949 



Xo. 3 




Founder and Present Head of 
Patterson School, Legerwood 



©tje Iftgljland 
Qltjurrljman 



Box 55 



Valle Cruris, N. C. 



Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19. 
1943. at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy. 50c a year. 

The Bishop. The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. \V. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



A Great Heritage 

(An Editorial from The Charlotte 
Observer) 

The Anglican communions, which are 
now celebrating the 400th anniversary 
of the Book of Common Prayer, are 
observing the compilation of a work 
that, considered purely as literature, is 
the heritage, not only of the Anglican 
Churches, but of the whole English- 
speaking world. 

For, as literature, the Book of Com- 
mon Prayer is no more sectarian than 
the Book of Psalms. Indeed, many of 
its rolling sentences, which, by the very 
majesty of the language, lift one above 
mundane trivialities and into the spir- 
itual realm, are taken almost bodily 
from the Psalms of David. 

The Prayer Book, as it is commonly 
called, is not the product of any one 
writer or even of any one age; it grew, 
rather, through the centuries out of the 
hopes and aspirations of the English 
people. Those familiar with its history 
can trace through certain phrases in the 
Litany, in the Order for Holy Com- 
munion, and in the Morning Prayers, 



the long struggle of England and the 
English-speaking world for religious 
liberty. 

As the growth of centuries, therefore, 
it is a distillation of the finest prose that 
has been written in English. Hundreds 
of prayers were written in that time, but 
only those that went to the hearts of the 
people, gave voice to their mute long- 
ings, put into words that which they 
felt deeply but could not express — only 
those that were written for all times and 
for all men were worthy of inclusion in 
the prayer book. 

As a result, Roger Taine, the French 
scholar who wrote the greatest history 
of English literature, observed that, 
when all of England went to church on 
Sunday morning and joined in the 
solemn and elevated language, the meas- 
ured cadences of the Litany, it was like 
the recitation of a national poem. 

It is a poem that all can understand, 
for, in spite of its epic style, it talks the 
language of the people; it abounds in 
words of one syllable; it abhors the 
abstruse and clings to the simple. In 
that simplicity lies the key to its great- 
ness. 

Last Sunday six thousand people 
knelt in the Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine in New York to begin the cele- 
bration by repeating those deathless 
phrases, age old, yet somehow always 
new. 



Patterson School 



Like many priests and laymen of his 
day, Samuel Patterson saw the need for 
educating youth in schools which taught 
the Christian way of life. To this end 
he made possible the founding of Pat- 
terson School which has rendered such 
notable service to the Diocese for forty 
years. 

Should we be content with just laud- 
ing founder and past leaders, Malcolm 
Taylor, Alfred Lawrence and Hugh 
Dobbin? Are we to tell George Wiese 
that Patterson must continue with token 
financial support from the Diocese? We 
can do more. We can attend the Field 
Day and give generously to Patterson 
School. 



Confirmation, A Study 

By The Rt. Rev. R. E. Gribbin 



Few members of the Church have the privilege of taking part in a Confirmation 
Service more than once or twice a year. The expression ''taking part" is used 
advisedly because Confirmation, like the other services of the Church, is a cor- 
porate act in which the laity as well as the clergy have their important part. Be- 
cause the church member seldom participates in this service it seems advisable to 
set forth these few notes on Confirmation with the hope that Confirmation may 
mean more to those already confirmed and that the confirmed will be able to tell 
others about the significance of the service. 

The Bible name of the service is "Laying on of Hands" (see top of page 296 
of the Prayer Book). The first record of the service of laying on of hands is found 
in the passage from the 8th Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, page 296 of the 
prayer book, which is usually read in the Confirmation Service. The Apostles 
Peter and John were sent by their fellow Apostles from Jerusalem down to Samaria. 
Peter and John prayed for those in Samaria who had been baptized that they might 
receive the Holy Ghost, and following that prayer they laid their hands on them 
and they received the Holy Ghost. In the 19th Chapter of the Acts of the Apostles 
there is a record of St. Paul in the City of Ephesus, laying his hands on some men 
who had just been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. They received the 
Holy Ghost. In Hebrews VI, vs. 1 and 2, the laying on of hands is declared to be 
one of the six principles of the doctrine of Christ. These are the only references 
in the Bible to the laying on of hands in connection with Confirmation. However, 
some of the passages mentioning annointing and the seal of the spirit are regarded 
as indicating Confirmation. 

The confirmed renews the promises made at his baptism. This act, as well as 
the promise to follow Christ, is preliminary to Confirmation, but very important. 
It is of interest that to follow Christ is placed in the duty of a member of the 
Church (Prayer Book p. 291). The Office of Instruction, p. 291, states that the 
receiving of the strengthening gifts of the Holy Spirit will help the member of the 
Church to fulfill his bounden duty — follow Christ, to worship God every Sunday in 
His Church; and to work and pray and give for the spread of His kingdom. 

The essence of this service is the receiving of the strengthening gifts of the 
Holy Spirit. The initial gifts of Baptism are completed, and the Christian is 
strengthened for his daily warfare. 

The versicles on p. 297 come from the Psalms. The corporate act of Confirma- 
tion is first indicated in the middle of p. 297, where the Bishop says "Let Us Pray". 
This prayer has been used since at least the year 375, and has been in its English 
form over 400 years. 

The prayer for the manifold (seven gifts of grace) is based on Isaiah XI, 
though it should be noted that we find only six of these gifts in the Authorised 
and Revised versions of the Bible. The Vulgate and the Septuagint list the seven 
gifts. 

The blessing of the Bishop as he places his hands on the head of each person 
emphasizes the confirmand's continuing relationship with God and his daily in- 
crease in the Holy Spirit. 

3 



40th Anniversary Field Day Saturday, October 29 

At Patterson School in Happy Valley 



On September 6, Patterson School 
opened its fortieth consecutive session 
with an enrollment of 60 students. Since 
its founding by bequest to the Mission- 
ary District of Asheville (now the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina) of his 
home and lands by the Hon. Samuel 
Legerwood Patterson, the school has 
been devoted to the values of Chris- 
tianity and offered a high type of prac- 
tical and theoretical education at a low 
cost. In the forty years since its open- 
ing on September 29, 1949, the school 
under the direction of the Rev. Mr. 
Taylor, the Rev. Hugh A. Dobbin, and 
Mr. George F. Wiese has seen buildings 
erected, changes and improvements take 
place, boys grow into men, and always 
the worship of God, the work on farm 
and in forest, and classroom learning has 
gone hand in hand. 

The value of the Patterson School of 
the past is seen in the lives of the men 
who received their training here and now 
hold places of service in many walks of 
life. Today we sometimes wonder if a 
Church farm school still fills a need. 
Believing that it does and that at no 
other time has the effort to build char- 
acter and train the spiritual life of our 
future citizens been more important, the 
Patterson School on this fortieth anni- 
versary is looking forward to further 
expansion. The long-term plan includes 
doubling the number of boys who will 
enjoy the opportunities the school of- 
fers, completing the gymnasium which 
is being built by the labor of the boys 
and the contributions of friends, new 
dormitories, a memorial chapel, faculty 
houses, swimming pool, and a perma- 
nent camp. 

Between the past and the future, in 
honor of Patterson's forty years, it is 
planned to hold a FIELD DAY on Sat- 
urday, October 29, designed to pass in 
review the work and teaching of Pat- 



terson School and especially to show the 
products of the soil and its value to man. 
There will be tours of the school forest, 
dairy barn and milk house, fields, school 
buildings, exhibits of farm implements 
and school work, contests on the athletic 
field for one and all. There will be in- 
teresting speakers on agricultural topics. 
There will be a community fair in the 
gymnasium, to which friends and neigh- 
bors are invited to bring entries of any- 
thing of interest and value to rural life. 
In the afternoon Patterson School's 
team will play a game of football with 
Hildebran High School on its home field. 

We should like to invite everyone who 
is interested in Patterson School, any- 
one interested in a school of the Epis- 
copal Church, anyone interested in an 
agricultural and forestry school, anyone 
interested in a boy who might benefit 
from such a program as we offer, — par- 
ents, alumni, past or prospective stu- 
dents, Churchmen, friends — to enjoy the 
day with us. Bring a basket lunch 
which will be eaten, picnic style, on 
tables on the campus. The program 
will begin at 10 o'clock. The football 
game will begin at 2 that afternoon. 
Come and help us celebrate forty years 
for Church and country; come and see 
what Patterson School has done and 
hopes to do. 



HICKORY RECTOR'S WIFE 
INJURED 

Mrs. Robert B. Cambell, wife of the 
rector of the Church of the Ascension, 
Hickory, suffered an unfortunate injury 
to her foot in a fall. Mrs. Cambell was 
either entering or leaving the postoffice 
when the accident occurred. She was 
to have been a delegate from the diocese 
to the Triennial meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary in San Francisco. 




St. Stephens Mission 
Consecrated 

Bishop Henry of Diocese of Western 
North Carolina Holds Con- 
secration Services 

St. Stephen's Episcopal Mission, locat- 
ed on Bouchelle street near Catawba, 
was consecrated at 4:30 p. m. Sundav, 
August seventh. The Rt. Rev. M. G. 
Henry, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina, held the service 
of consecration. 

St. Stephen's Mission, a Negro church, 
was built by the E. P. Dale Construc- 
tion Co. following plans drawn up by 
Harry A. Boggs, architect. The Rev. C. 
G. Leavell is the priest-in-charge jointly 
with the Rev. Ven. James T. Kennedy 
who comes down from Asheville to hold 
services. The church building commit- 
tee was composed of Fred O'Neill, chair- 
man; Mrs. Augusta Scott Wilson, treas- 
urer; Mrs. Kathleen Harbison Young; 
Mrs. Belle Happoldt. 

According to the laws of the Episcopal 
church no church or chapel may be con- 
secrated until it is fully paid for. In 



addition to funds from the local St. 
Stephen's congregation and from the 
sale of the old St. Stephen's lot, consid- 
erable sums towards its erection were 
obtained from the National Council of 
the Episcopal church, from the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina, from Grace 
church, Morganton, and from the Ameri- 
can Church Building and Commissions. 
The church will seat about one hun- 
dred people. Under the chancel is a 
basement large enough to accommodate 
gatherings of an informal nature. In 
addition there are small rooms on either 
side of the chancel. The construction is 
based on cinder block, with stucco out- 
side. The type of architecture is Gothic. 



THY WILL, NOT MINE 

When in the quietude of silent prayer. 

I lay before Thy feet a world of care 

And find my supplications with re- 
quests are fraught, 

May I, Omniscient Father, heed but 
this one thought — ■ 

Thy will be done, not mine. 

— By Mildred Lescarboura Greene. 

— The Church News. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Y\ e shall devote our page this month 
to our Diocesan Altar Guild! 

Miss Virginia Green 
Saluda, North Carolina 

Dear Miss Green: 

Your report to the Woman's Auxiliary 
at Kanuga Conference was splendid. It 
was my first trip to Kanuga and I had 
a very fine time. 

Perhaps you do not recall that I asked 
you for your name and address at that 
time and that I would seek information 
of you at a later time regarding the 
little church mission with which we are 
struggling here in Sylva. When Mr. 
Green and I moved to Sylva in October 
of last year it was difficult to learn if 
there was an Episcopal church here or 
its location. We found a small, sadly- 
needing-repair building, with a leaning 
cross and a congregation of two. Since 
last October we have painted the build- 
ing, inside and out, for the first time in 
twenty-two years (at least that long 
according to the painter), had a new 
cross properly erected over the steeple, 
purchased a new wheel for the bell 
which could not be rung for fear of its 
falling, removed all the sparrow nests 
(about a truck load) from the ceiling 
which was dropping down plank by 
plank because of a leaking roof, and 
secured a new roof which was the gift of 
two doctors. An Auxiliary of eight 
members was organized in December. 
Its work has been to build and upholster 
kneeling benches, make cushions for the 
altar guild work. We begged from Otey 
Church in Sewanee, Tennessee (our 
home) vestments for one of our two lay 
readers. 

Our financial status has been some- 
thing like this : Last October the church 
was in debt the year's assessment to the 
Diocese, and owed a balance from two 
years previous of #30.00 on the oil fur- 
nace. We assessed all the members we 
could possibly corral enough to pay 



these debts. Our rummage sale netted 
#212.00 and the Presbyterians who were 
also using the building donated #50.00. 
We raised Mr. Morgan's pay #5.00 on 
the month. We have purchased rug 
runners for the aisle and now have the 
money to buy a curtain to hang behind 
the altar. 

There is much more to be done. We 
do not have a communion service or any 
linens. There is no brass except the 
cross for our altar and we have only 
two candlesticks which are wood. There 
is one set of hangings which we salvaged 
from the moths, which were dry cleaned 
free of charge, and which are sadly 
faded. In this connection I am writing 
you. We shall be grateful for any sug- 
gestions of raising funds, getting new 
members, a gift of linen or any of the 
other altar articles. We would especially 
like to have vestments for our other lay 
reader or organist, either new or used. 
I might say here, that most of our ladies 
do beautiful sewing and can and will 
make any linens or garments if they 
have the materials. 

This week the Presbyterians are mov- 
ing into their own new building making 
it possible to have Sunday morning ser- 
vices instead of the 4 P. M. servcies 
which we have been having. We hope 
to get the floors sanded this week. A 
student worker came from Valley Crucis 
last Friday and will be with us for about 
six weeks. We are hoping he will do a 
lot of visiting and perhaps we might 
even have a confirmation class as well 
as start a Sunday School. 

Do come to see us if you are in the 
vicinity of Sylva. Mr. Green and I look 
forward to knowing your brother who 
is now the Vice-Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity of The South. We shall meet 
him when we are visiting Mr. Green's 
family in Sewanee. 

Yours in Christian Service, 

Mrs. Herman W. Green. 



Dear Contributors: 

Your response to the appeal for 
money with which to buy white hangings 
for the Chapel of The Transfiguration, 
at Kanuga Lake was so generous that 
I was able to buy for the chapel articles 
in addition to the altar hangings. 

All of these things were badly needed 
by the chapel and after talking with Mr. 
Pinckney decided to buy first the stoles 
as per his suggestion — then having still 
more money I made the corporals as 
Miss Addison told me there were none. 

I hope this meets with your approval 
and I deeply appreciate your interest 
and help. 

Sincerely yours, 

Frances McLaren. 



WINTERS ORDAINED DEACON 

September 8th, the Feast of the Na- 
tivity of the Blessed Virgin Mary ac- 
cording to ancient calenders, was the 
date of the ordination of Rhett Y. Win- 
ters to the Sacred Diaconate at the 
Church of the Transfiguration, Bat 
Cave. Since his graduation from the 
theological school at Alexandria, Va., 
Mr. Winters had been serving as lay 
reader in charge of the Church. He 
will continue there as deacon-in-charge. 

Mr. Winters was ordained by Bishop 
M. George Henry, the preacher at the 
service being the Rev. David Yates, 
rector of the Chapel of the Cross, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. Mr. Winters had been a 
student member of his congregation 
during his undergraduate days at Chap- 
el Hill. 

After the service which was held in 
the presence of a full church, a luncheon 
was held in the parish house. At that 
time the Bishop introduced the newly 
ordained deacon informally to the 
guests. 

The only diocesan clergy present were 
the Rev. Messrs. Tuton, Lambert, Sill, 
Saylor. Capers, Jenkins, Rossmaessler 
and Leach. In the interest of accurate 
reporting, it must be said that the last 
named arrived very late. 

"KEY MEN" OF DIOCESE MEET 

Bishop Henry and Mr. A. B. Stoney, 
'"Key man" for the Diocese in the Pre- 



siding Bishop's work for Laymen of the 
Church, held successful meetings for the 
two convocations the first and second of 
September. Out of twenty-four men to 
attend (one from each parish or mis- 
sion) twenty-three attended in the Con- 
vocation of Asheville; fifteen out of a 
possible eighteen attended in the Con- 
vocation of Morganton. Plans were 
made at these meetings for increasing 
the work of laymen within the congre- 
gations of the Diocese, with a special 
emphasis on evangelism. 

A Diocesan-wide meeting of laymen 
is being planned for November 9th, to 
be held in the Community Building, 
Morganton. Mr. Jim Smith, of Bir- 
mingham, Alabama, is to be the chief 
speaker. Mr. Smith is Provincial Chair- 
man for laymen's work, and is described 
by Mr. Stoney as "a ball of fire." 



The Executive Council and the De- 
partment of Missions have approved 
plans which are now under way for the 
beginning of a new mission, which it is 
hoped will soon become a parish, in the 
fast-growing section of the See City 
known as "West Asheville." 

The next step is a meeting to be held 
at the Diocesan House on October 24th 
with the Rectors of the three Asheville 
parishes and certain laymen from each 
of these parishes. Bishop Henry and 
a representative from the Executive 
Council will meet with this group and 
discuss plans for a survey of West Ashe- 
ville. 



FORMER EDITOR SEEN BRIEFLY 

The Rev. Dudley Stroup, a former 
editor of the Highland Churchman 
and sometime priest in charge of mis- 
sions in Asheville, was seen in a pro- 
cession of two hundred other priests at 
the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. 
The occasion of Fr. Stroup's appearance 
was the first of many congresses being 
held throughout the nation by the 
American Church Union, the purpose 
being to give thanks for the gift of the 
Book of Common Prayer. Excluding 
the present editor, there were 5999 
people in the congregation. 



Convention Plans For Youth 



The Convention of Young Church- 
men of the Diocese is to be held at Trin- 
ity Church, Asheville, October 21st and 
22nd. The tentative program is as 
follows : 

4-6 P. M. : Registration in Trinity 
Parish House. 

6:30 P.M.: Supper. 

Welcome and Response. 

"The Rule of Life", the Rev. Hopkins 
Weston, St. Andrew's Church, Green- 
ville, S. C. 

8:00 P. M.: Evening Prayer. Ser- 
mon by the Rt. Rev. M. G. Henry, D. D. 

Recreation. 



10:15 P. M.: Preparation Service, 
the Rev. W. C. Leach, Chairman of 
Youth Commission. 

Saturday, October 22nd: 

8 : 00 A. M. : Holy Communion. 

10:00 A. M.: Business Session: Roll 
Call, Minutes, Old Business, New Busi- 
ness, Nominations. 

Lunch. 

Election of Officers. Adjournment. 

All young people of the Diocese are 
urged to attend. If you plan to attend, 
write "Hospitality Committee", Trinity 
Church, Church and Aston Sts., Ashe- 
ville, N. C, and reservations will be 
made to take care of you overnight. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy who wish to 
supplement the protection for their families given by the Pension Fund, 
and to lay officials and active lay workers of the Church, either volun- 
tary or paid, and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5. N. Y. 



Provincial Youth Meeting 



The Provincial Youth Convention met 
August the first through the sixth at the 
Dubose Conference Center in Mont- 
eagle, Tennessee, with delegates from 
the Dioceses of South Florida, Atlanta, 
Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South 
Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, 
Kentucky, Lexington, Western North 
Carolina, and Upper South Carolina 
present. 

This Conference is held annually with 
the purpose of promoting the interest 
of young people in the responsibilities 
of the Church. Different "work-shops" 
were held in the afternoons dealing with 
finances, program-building, visual aids, 
and many other subjects, — the topics 
being particularly chosen to show the 
different ways youth can help in the 
spread of Christ's Kingdom. 

Each morning lectures and discussions 
were held at which time matters con- 
cerning the life of Christ, the Church, 



and religion were openly discussed and 
the different ideas and views on the 
matters presented. 

New officers were elected to the Pro- 
vincial Youth Commission. All dele- 
gates seemed determined to go back to 
their Dioceses and present the different 
ideas and plans suggested at the Con- 
vention. 

Western North Carolina had a full 
delegation at this Convention in the per- 
son of the Diocesan President, Vice- 
President, and Secretary, Mary Aston 
Leavell, of Grace, Morganton, David 
Reid, of Trinity, Asheville, and Sally 
Goodyear, of Holy Cross ( Tryon. 

Mary Aston Leavell was re-elected to 
the Provincial Youth Commission and 
later elected Vice-Chairman of the Pro- 
vince to serve with Philip Pocher, Dio- 
cese of South Carolina, Chairman, and 
Barbara Barker, Diocese of Atlanta, 
Secretary. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

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Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



ST. JOHN'S, MARION 

Work will soon begin on the first unit 
of our building programme to enlarge 
the church building and to build a parish 
house. The nave will be lengthened 
seventeen feet and will accommodate 30 
more people. What is now the entrance 
porch under the tower will be made into 
a Baptistry. A new hot air oil heated 
furnace will be installed. Later, when 
the money is in sight, the chancel will 
be rearranged and the parish house built 
on the back of the church lot. S. Grant 
Alexander and Associate Architects, of 
Asheville, are in charge of the work. 



THE BOOK ORDER SHOP 

OF HENRY TALBOT SHARP 

2 1 Wall Street, Asheville, North Carolina 

Can Fill Your Order for Any Book at 

Publishers Rates Strictly, Postage Prepaid; 

Shipments Direct. 

Featuring Morehouse-Gorham Titles. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



Mr. Robert W. Twitty, Chairman 
and Treasurer of the Marion Manufac- 
turing Co., has been appointed "Key 
Man" for St. John's for the Presiding 
Bishop's Committee for Laymen's work. 

St. John's will go on the air over 
Station WBRM, Marion, for the first 
time on the first Sunday in October at 
eleven o'clock. During the week of 
October 10th, the Rector will broadcast 
for the "Devotional Hour", Monday 
through Friday, from nine until nine- 
fifteen, over the same station. This 
"Devotional Hour" is a weekly feature 
sponsored by the McDowell Ministerial 
Association. 



BAPTIST CLERGYMAN NOW 
EPISCOPAL PRIEST 

Syracuse, N. Y. — The Rev. Harold S. 
Knight, a 37-year-old former Baptist 
clergyman, was ordained to the priest- 
hood of the Episcopal Church by the 
Rt. Rev. Malcolm E. Peabody, Bishop 
of Central New York, in St. Mark's 
Episcopal Church, Clark Mills, X. Y. 

Mr. Knight has been in charge of St. 
Mark's Church, Clark Mills, ^and St. 
Peter's Church, Oriskany, first as lay 
reader, then as Deacon. In the Episco- 
pal Church laymen may be commission- 
ed by the Bishop to conduct certain 
Church services in the absence of a 
priest Mr. Knight was ordained Dea- 
con in January of this year. 



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10 



CHURCH PLANS TOWER PROJECT 

Little Switzerland. — Mrs. H e r i o t 
Clarkson, president of the Woman's 
Guild of the Church of the Resurrection, 
has announced a donation of $100 by 
Randolph Scott, movie star of Holly- 
wood, toward a bell tower to be built of 
native stone at the front of the church. 

The belfry would serve also as a ves- 
tibule of the building. 

A large bell was given to the late 
Judge Heriot Clarkson a number of 
years ago and has been placed in Geneva 
Hall for lack of a suitable place to hang 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

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Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
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it. For some time donations have been 
sought by Mrs. Clarkson toward the 
tower building fund. 

Mrs. Clarkson has announced that the 
bell will serve as a fire alarm for the 
community, as well as summon worship- 
pers Sundays. 



Order Your Copy Today! 

RECTOR'S GUILD COOK BOOK 

Favorite recipes of members Grace 
Church In-the-Mountains, Waynesville, 
N. C $1.00 Prepaid. 



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During his boyhood Scott was a vis- 
itor in the summer home of Mrs. Clark- 
son and the late Judge Clarkson here. 

SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Ashevffle, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 

Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 

five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. _ 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upoa 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



3Ihe]|tgI)lanb 
CTjutcIjtnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XX 



DECEMBER, 1949 



No. 5 



In This Christmas Issue: 

A Christmastide Fable 2 

Historical Survey Underway 3 

Hickory Cornerstone Laid 4 

New Gastonia Church 4 

Marion Church Expands 4 

Hendersonville's Chapel 5 

Woman's Auxiliary News 6 

Meeting the Budget 7 

Laymen's Meeting Successful 8 

Negro Priest Secured 9 

Work in West Asheville 11 

Theological Education 12 



©tj* 2jtgtjian& 
Qlifurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



A Christmastide Fable 

By The Dean of Durham 
{Reprint from CHURCH TIMES) 

When one is dealing with matters 
which are clearly beyond human com- 
prehension, in the full sense of the word, 
it is perhaps desirable and certainly 
permissible to attempt to explain them 
by the method of fable. Let us see 
whether by this method we can throw 
some light on to the central mystery 
and Incarnation. It is an obvious 
metaphor to say that the purpose of 
creation was that there should arise 
from earth a song of praise to God the 
Creator which shall be in tune with the 
hymn which Cherubim and Seraphim 
continually utter in the celestial concert. 
It is clear that the earthly orchestra 
fails completely to fulfill its task, for 
its members fail either to keep time 
with one another or to watch for the 
conductor's beat, and even dispute the 
rights of any one conductor to direct 
their efforts. This failure is not un- 
marked in heaven and it inevitably 
grieves the Son of God, by whom all 



things were made. So he, let it be 
imagined with all reverence, summons 
the Archangels to a conference. "This 
continual discord," he says, "is intol- 
erable: something must clearly be done 
about it, for it seems at times as if they 
hardly so much as know the tune which 
they are trying to play." The Arch- 
angels naturally agree, and one of them, 
perhaps Michael, says: "Yes, sir, the 
discord is terrible: it sounds to me as if 
they were all trying to play tunes of 
their own, I quite agree that something 
ought to be done." And Christ says: "I 
think I will go down myself and teach 
them." At first the Archangels are all 
dismayed, but at last Michael says: 
"Yes, sir: I can see that that would im- 
press them. If you came down like 
thunder and fire it would be bound to 
have a great effect. We all saw that an 
impression was made when that hap- 
pened on Sinai, and of course you would 
take with you a great company of angels : 
how many legions are you thinking of, 
sir? Twelve, at least, I should hope." 
But Christ smiles and says: "No, 
Michael, I am thinking of going alone." 
Michael is startled, as well he might be, 
but after a moment he says: "Of 
course, sir, that would be a very noble 
gesture, and if you come flying on the 
wings of the wind it will be very im- 
pressive, too. You'll remember, sir, that 
old Irish song: 

On cherubim and seraphim 
Full royally he rode 
and on the wings of the winds 
Came flying all alone. 

Oh, yes, sir, I think that's a great 
idea." But Christ smiles again and 
says: "No, Michael, that wasn't quite 
what I had in mind. I think I will go 
down among them just as an ordinary 
man. You see," he whent on, "they 
seem to have such strange ideas about 
Kingship, and Power and Glory. These 
kings of ssyria and Egypt are really 
terribly stupid: they seem to think that 
to raise great armies or build great 
pyramids is the way to show their great- 
ness, and I feel they ought to be taught 
a lesson. I should like to show them 



how silly and vulgar their ideas are: so 
I think I shall go down as a poor man's 
son." The Archangels are terribly 
shocked and murmur to one another: 
and at last one of them, bolder than 
the rest, says: "But forgive my saying 
it, sir, won't it be a great risk? Perhaps 
they may not recognize you and what 
will happen then?" ''Some, no doubt, 
will not recognize me," answered Christ, 
"but others will, and it is on them that 
I shall rely." "But there may not be 
enough of them, sir," argues the Arch- 
angel, "you might be in real danger of 
vour life." "That is a danger which I 
must face," says Christ, and he turns 
to Gabriel and tells him to go to Nazar- 
eth and prepare for his coming. And 
so to end our fable, he came. We know 
the rest of the story: we know that the 
fears of the Archangels were justified, 
and that his enemies were strong enough 
to put him to a shameful death. But 



we know also that in a few short years 
of earthly life he set a standard for 
human life which the world has never 
been able to forget, showing to mankind 
that true royalty is shown in service, 
that true Glory lies in the most complete 
self-sacrifice and that the only ultimate 
Power in the world is the power of Love. 

If you really think that that is a story 
which selfish men are likely to have in- 
vented as the central doctrine of religion, 
I can only say that you have a higher 
opinion of human nature than exper- 
ience suggests to me. Let me add a 
sentence from an author of far greater 
learning and authority than myself, 
whose sanity of judgment few will dis- 
pute. "The birth of Christianity is 
unintelligible unless we believe that the 
historical Jesus impressed those who 
lived with him as God made manifest 
in the flesh." 



Asheville Man To Catalog Church Portraits 



American church history is a topic 
claiming more and more attention from 
the scholars. A number of graduate 
students in the field of history, especially 
in the South, are doing research in that 
field, and feature stories in newspapers 
nearly always create an interest in the 
subject. 

At the annual meeting of the South- 
ern Historcial Association in Williams- 
burg, Ya., during the second week in 
November paper entitled "The Vir- 
ginia Vestry: A Study in Political Re- 
sponsibility" was read by Professor 
Kimbrough Owen of the Louisiana State 
University. Mr. Owen dealt with many 
of the early duties of the church vestry 
as well as the organization and the 
growth and decline of the colonial vestry 



system itself. The discussion which 
followed the reading of thisp aper indi- 
cated that a lively interest had been 
created in the subject and that there is 
need for further study along this line. 

A survey of the historical records of 
the Episcopal Church in North Carolina 
is now underway. Widespread interest 
in this project has already been shown 
by several students, an artist who wants 
to compile a catalogue of portraits now 
in the state, and numerous church peo- 
ple. Those knowing of parishes and 
missions whose records have not been 
listed for this survey are asked to con- 
tact William S. Powell, Department of 
Archives and History, Raleigh, N. C. 
A questionnaire prepared for this pur- 
pose will be sent to those desiring it. 



News Around The Diocese 



Hickory 

The corner-stone of the new Ascen- 
sion, Hickory, was laid Sunday after- 
noon, November 20th, by the Rt. Rev. 
M. G. Henry, D.D. Seventy-one years 
ago, on that same date, the corner-stone 
of the first church had been laid. 

The Rector of Ascension, the Rev. 
Robert B. Campbell, acted as Master 
of Ceremonies at the impressive service 
attended by approximately four hund- 
red persons. Extra chairs were placed 
in the aisles to accommodate the con- 
gregation in the new church which 
normally seats' 350 persons. The Rev. 
Richard Lee, Rector of St. Luke's, 
Lincolnton, read the first lesson, and 
the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Rector of 
St. James', Lenoir, read the second 
lesson. Mr. T. Manly Whitener, Jun- 
ior Warden of Ascension, told of the 
contents of the Corner-stone which in- 
cluded a proram of the service, a list of 
the members and officers of Ascension 
Church, and a copy of the Rev. Mr. 
Campbell's recent address on the build- 
ing of the new church together with ex- 
pressions of appreciation to those in 
Hickory who had made the new building 
possible. 

Towards the close of the service 
Bishop Henry struck the Corner-stone 
three times and said: 

"In the Name of the Father, and of 
the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: I lay 
the Corner Stone of the Church of the 
Ascension erected to the service of God, 
and for the spreading of the Gospel, and 
the psiritual nourishment of His child- 
ren, according to the use of that branch 
of His Holy Church, Catholic and 
Apostolic (commonly called the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in the United 
States of America.) 

Other foundation can no man lay than 
that is laid, even Jesus Christ Amen." 

St. John's, Marion 

The addition to the church has been 
completed and is a great improvement. 



The former porch is being made into a 
Baptistry which will contain a small 
altar with cross and candles. A new 
sandstone font is being given as a thank- 
offering. Twenty men of the Parish at- 
tended the meeting held in Morganton 
under the auspices of "The Presiding 
Bishop's Committee on Laymen's 
Work." One of the annual events in 
Marion is the Spaghetti Supper given by 
the Woman's Auxiliary in the Commun- 
ity Building. The limit is two hundred 
people. Possibly one hundred more 
tickets could have been sold so famous 
are the members of the Auxiliary for 
their spaghetti suppers. 

St. Mark's, Gastonia 

St. Mark's has taken on new life since 
we have moved to our new church, 
which is Georgian Colonial in architec- 
ture with columned entrances at the 
front and on the Parish House side. The 
church furnishings are all white and 
walnut, with pale green walls and wine 
carpeting. Everyone has taken part in 
getting off to a good start and several 
members have made gifts to the church, 
such as the Altar, donated by Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Dawson, a new flag, given 
by Mrs. W. D. Lawson, Mrs. R. W. 
Langford, and Mrs. W. D. Anderson. 
The crosses over each entrance were 
given by Mr. W. L. Balthis, and the 
credence table by the Y.P.S.L. Mrs. 
George Cocker has donated our new 
organ which is being installed at the 
present time. Mr. R. W. Langford has 
been untiring in his efforts to beautify 
the grounds and in constructing cab- 
inets and shelves for the Parish House, 
and Dr. and Mrs. P. L. Freeman have 
donated bookshelves for the minister's 
study. We are also to have a new oil 
heating unit installed at an early date. 

Our first service in our new church 
was an 8 o'clock Holy Communion serv- 
ice on September 18. On October 23, 
Mr. Cravner conducted an interesting 




St Mark's Church, Gastonia 



and impressive service commemorating 
the 400th anniversary of the Prayer 
Book. On October 25, the Sunday 
School had a teachers' meeting and sup- 
per in the Parish House with the Rev- 
erend Mr. Lee, of Lincolnton, making 
the address. On October 30, the 
Y.P.S.L. were hosts to our interdenom- 
inational meeting of the young people's 
organizations, with a grand program and 
refreshments served in the Parish 
House. Our bazaar, which we hope will 
be bigger and better than ever before, 
will be held on November 30. 

Extensive Building Program Underway 
at Hendersonville 

Mr. an Mrs. Carl Braznell have given 
St. James' Church #15,000 which will 
be used to complete the Morning Chapel. 
The architect gives the following de- 
scription of the Chapel: 

"The Morning Chapel is of rural 
English parish church design. The 
walls will be of solid, coursed granite, 
with doors framed in carved limestone 
of simple English Gothic design. The 
window frames, tracery, buttress caps 
and finals are of the same limestone. 



The Chapel interior will be finished 
with colorful crab orchard quartzite 
stone, and the ceiling will be molded oak 
beams and panels." 

A contract has been let to build an ad- 
ditional room on the Parish House. 
When completed this new room and the 
Guild room will make one large room 
to be used for assemblies, suppers, and 
other gatherings. Work on the new 
room has already begun. 

Bulletins Give Varied Parish News 

The weekly bulletin of Trinity Par- 
ish gives sidelights on life of a large 
parish. One issue tells of contribution 
consisting of an envelope containing 
money and two dental X-ray films. 
We've often heard that getting money 
is like pulling teeth, but Trinity seems 
to have come up with a new angle. 

Mrs. Miriam Brown has been added 
to the parish staff as Parish Hostess and 
will be in charge of the kitchen and 
dining room. 

On All Saints, at an evening service, 
special choral groups under the direc- 
tion of Mr. William Privette gave a 
performance of Brahms Requiem. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Worship Study Service Fellowship 

For the next few months let us med- 
itate on Highlights from the Triennial 
as reported by our delegates. This 
month Mrs. Wright and Mrs. Haden 
have furnished the material. Next 
month we shall hear from Mrs. Kemper, 
Mrs. Stoney, Mrs. Craven and Mrs. 
Capers. 

Mrs. Wright reporting on "The 
Christian Advance in a Revolutionary 
World." 

In this time of Revolutionary move- 
ment in the world, the Church, as it 
has done down through history, has 
been closely associated with social and 
political upheval. The Church has made 
a steady advance in history, but it has 
become not a question of Christian Ad- 
vance in the present revolutionary world, 
but a question of whether the Church 
can survive at all in this world. 

In his address to the triennial meeting, 
The Rt. Rev. Stephen C. Neills, Assist- 
ant to the Archibshop of Canterbury, 
suggests five ways the church must take 
if it is to survive. 

1. We must have a better under- 
standing of the universe, we know there 
is a spiritual world, that eternitye is 
more important than time, that loyalty, 
truth, justice, mercy are deepest real- 
ities of this life. 

2. We must have a realistic under- 
standing of the nature of man, that men 
by nature is sinful, and that most of the 
troubles of humanity comes from within 
the human heart. 

3. We must realize our responsibil- 
ity to society. The Church in its blind- 
ness to the need of peoples have allowed 
people outside the Church to step in 
and serve the need. 

4. We need better discipline and de- 
votion to our own cause. It is very 



hard to sell a gospel to peoples of other 
nations when we do not accept it. 

5. We must manifest a greater 
fellowship within the Church. Numbers 
of people have been turned away be- 
cause of lack of fellowship and petty 
jealousies. "All advances in the end 
are marginal", concludes Bishop Neill. 

There is only one way to Christian 
Advance in this revolutionary world, 
and that is in returning to Jesus. 

In returning to Him, He will set our 
feet in an ordered path that in his own 
o-ood time will truly "call us unto His 
Holy Fellowship". 

Mrs. Haden reports: 

"Bishop Sherrill was impressed with 
the awakened interest in Christian Edu- 
cation. 

Unless we at home are inspired, this 
"new" day in Christian Education will 
remain just another program on paper. 

New Christian Education program 
needs plenty of Top Sargents. We have 
the Commissioned officers and the pri- 
vates, but we need many of you lay 
people to take voluntary training and 
be our Top Sargents. 

Dr. Theodore P. Ferris, gave the mem- 
bers of the Triennial moments that will 
live with them always, as he led the 
series of meditations the second week. 

"Called unto His Holy Fellowship" — 
the theme of the Triennial was certainly 
evident throughout the convention. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of Japan sent 
this message: "Tell them we have hope 
— and faith." 

We who stayed at home, know that 
the field is the world, but the roots are 
in the parishes. Therefore, let us hear 
eagerly the reports of our delegates from 
time to time during the next three years, 
and make our parishes stronger than 
ever. 



Displaced Need Assurances 



The Episcopal Church, through action 
of its recent General Convention, pledg- 
ed the Church to an all-out effort to 
secure assurances for at least 1,200 ad- 
ditional displaced persons by Christmas 
of 1949, if possible and certainly by 
June 30, 1950. 

Displaced persons are European peo- 
ple who at the end of the war were 
stranded in Germany and Austria, 
having fled there from Soviet occupa- 
tion of their homelands, or been taken 
there by the Nazis as laborers. 

Federal legislation provides that 205,- 
000 DP's may enter our country before 
June 30, 1950, is assurances of jobs, 
housing and transportation in the United 
States is provided for them by American 
citizens. 

Episcopal Church leaders are urging 
individuals, parishes and parish organ- 
izations to "Make a Christian Christmas 
Gift" of the "assurance" that the Gov- 
ernment requires to permit admission of 
these needy people who have much to 
contribute to the welfare of America. 

Church World Service, interdenomi- 



national organization which is the clear- 
ing house for relief through the Churches 
overseas, matches assurances with fam- 
ilies best fitted to the specifications 
listed. They are able to provide farm 
hands, tenant workers, gardeners, cooks, 
domestic servants, carpenters, mechan- 
ics, secretarial workers, unskilled labor- 
ers, porters, nurses' aids, technicians, 
clerical workers, chauffeurs and people 
possessed of many other skills. 

Sponsors of DP's must agree that they 
shall not become public charges for five 
years. The Episcopal appeal states that 
information about blanks to be filled in, 
and the requirements of the Government 
are obtainable through clergymen or re- 
quests to diocesan or national Episcopal 
Church headquarters. 

A booklet explaining requirements of 
the Government and supplying other 
supplementary information is obtainable 
through diocesan Christian Social Re- 
lations chairmen, Woman's Auxiliary 
Christian Social Relations officers, 
Youth chairmen and Laymen's Work 
keymen. 



TOBIT 4:8,9 

New York — Because of the lack of 
time for proper preparation between 
General Convention's adoption of the 
1950 increased budget and the dates of 
this fall's Every Member Canvass, par- 
ishes are asked to work for at least as 
much as their 1949 goals this fall and 
then prepare for a second campaign 
early in 1950. This second campaign, 
ONE WORLD IN CHRIST, will be 
climaxed on March 12, 1950, when Pre- 
siding Bishop Henry K. Sherrill will 
speak by radio to all the people of the 
Church as they are attending Sunday 
morning Church services all over the 
land, just as he did on February 29, 
1948, on behalf of world relief. "When 
the people know, they will respond," 
the General Convention said. Hence, 
the National Council is asking every 
parish and mission throughout the 



Church to devote the period from Jan- 
uary 1 to March 12 1950, to an educa- 
tional program on different parts of the 
Church's work. "By doing the same 
thing in the same way, at the same 
time, we shall discover the great power 
which lies in a Church united in a 
common cause." 

In January the study theme is to be 
Our Work Overseas; in February, Our 
Work at Home and in the first part of 
March, Our Work in Christian Educa- 
tion. 

The National Council is preparing 
helps and suggestions about procedures, 
and the preliminary educational work 
is stressed as absolutely essential if 
Church people are to know needs and 
opportunities so that they will be willing 
and ager to give in amounts more close- 
ly approximating their actual ability 
than they have done in the past. 



170 Episcopal Laymen 

Present For Meeting 

The largest gathering of Episcopal 
laymen in the history of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina took place 
Wednesday evening, November 9th, in 
Morganton's Community Bilding as 170 
representatives from more than 25 par- 
ishes and missions assembled to hear 
church leaders outline a new program of 
laymen's work. 

It was an enthusiastic meeting high- 
lighted by addresses by the Rt. Rev. M. 
George Henry, bishop of Western North 
Carolina; James A. Smith, chairman of 
the Presiding Bishop Committee for lay- 
men's work in the fourth provience; the 
Rev. Edgar NefF, fourth provience field 
representative; and A. B. Stoney, dio- 
cesan chairman of laymen's work. 

Held under the sponsorship of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, a men's 
organization of Grace Episcopal church, 



the event attracted key churchmen from 
Gastonia to Murphy. Themes of the 
addresses heard accented the importance 
of the layman's role in advancing the 
work of the church. Representatives 
were urged to take back to their parishes 
and missions the objectives of the for- 
ward-looking program. 

As one of the featured speakers, 
Bishop Henry commended the lay dele- 
gates for their interest and hailed the 
large attendance as evidence of a pro- 
gressive spirit taking hold in the diocese. 
National Front 

Rev. Mr. Neff outlined the work the 
Episcopal church is carrying on in the 
national and international field. He re- 
ported that the Angelican Communion, 
of which the Episcopal church in the 
United States is a part, has forty million 
members, and that great strides are be- 
ing made in missionary fields. 

An inspirational talk on the need for 
a more active laity was given by Mr. 
Smith, a Birmingham, Ala., businessman. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy who wish to 
supplement the protection for their families given by the Pension Fund, 
and to lay officials and active lay workers of the Church, either volun- 
tary or paid, and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



Mr. Stoney presided during the meeting 
and introduced the visitors. John T. 
Roughton, Brotherhood director, wel- 
comed the churchmen. 

In a brief business meeting preceding 
the addresses, Ben Sumner of Ruther- 
fordton was elected secretary-treasurer 
of the laymn's work movement for the 
diocese. 



AN IMPORTANT POST 
TO BE FILLED 

One of the most important pieces of 
work facing the Diocese will have a 
partial solution on the first of the year 
when the new rector assumes his duties 
at St. Gabriel's Church Rutherfordton. 
Although the shortage of clergy has af- 
fected the Church's work everywhere in 
the Diocese, the need is most acutely felt 
among the colored congregations. With 
the exception of Archdeacon Kennedy, 
who is retired, there is no negro priest 
ministering to the six colored congrega- 
tions. 

The Rev. George B. Dayson will as- 
sume his duties as priest in charge of 
St. Gabriel's and St. Andrew's, Green 
River, on January 1st. At present he is 
on the staff of the Church of the Cruci- 
fixion, New York City. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by QVa". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



MRS. W. BAXTER BARTLETT 

Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek, has suf- 
fered a severe loss in the passing of Mrs. 
W. Baxter Bartlett, long a faithful and 
active member. Before her marriage 
she was Miss Lillian Shroat, and her 
early Church life was in Calvary Parish, 
Fletcher, which was near her home. She 
attended, and was a graduate of Christ 
School, which in its early days was co- 
educational, and drew many of its pupils 
from the neighborhood. A large throng 
crowded Calvary Church for the funeral, 
among them many of her old Christ 
School classmates. 

From earliest childhood she was a 
devoted member of the Church, and for 
many years was one of the most active 
and useful members of Trinity Chapel, 
Haw Creek. Her four children are also 
active members of the Chapel congre- 
gation, and a daughter, Mrs. Charles 
Bell, is one of the '"standbys" of the 
mission, and active in all phases of the 
Church's work. 

She is survived by four children and 
eleven grandchildren. The funeral serv- 
ice was conducted by the Rt. Rev. M. 
George Henry, and Rev. Norvin C. 
Duncan. 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr.. O.QS. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



CHAIRMAN OF CHILDREN'S 
COMMISSION REPORTS 

As chairman of the Diocesan Child- 
ren's Commission I wish to thank the 
clergy for their personal cards of en- 
dorsement, assuring their support of a 
Diocesan Interim Curriculum in our 
Church Schools. 

Your Committee will meet directly 
after Christmas and we shall introduce 
our courses of study as quickly as pos- 
sible. 

Needless to say, the preparation of 
such a curriculum demands a great deal 
of time, patience and study. 
Faithfully yours, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Chairman, Diocesan 
Children's Commission. 



THE BOOK ORDER SHOP 

OF HENRY TALBOT SHARP 

21 Wall Street, Asheville, North Carolina 

Can Fill Your Order for Any Book at 

Publishers Rates Strictly, Postage Prepaid; 

Shipments Direct. 

Featuring Morehouse-Gorham Titles. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 2-2461 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Complete Heating Plants 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



As For Jobs 

General Convention set minimum 
pensions for a retired Bishop at $2,500, 
the difference between Penion Fund and 
diocesan retirement fund pay and that 
minimum to be paid out of General Con- 
vention funds. And beginning next 
January 1st all other clergy at retire- 
ment for age will receive a minimum of 
$1,500 per year, except for those who 
were ordained very late, have not had 
premiums paid, and so on. 

Pensions are much in the industrial 
news, too. The following poem from 
"The Rotary Fellow" shows it used to 
be. 

In savage tribes, where skulls are thick 

And primeval passions rage, 
They have a system sure and quick 

To cure the blight of age; 
For when a native's youth has fled 

And years have sapped his vim, 
They simply knock him on the head 

And put an end to him. 
But we in this enlightened age 

Are built of sterner stuff, 
And so we look with righteous rage 

On deeds so rash and rough; 
For when a man grows old and gray 

And weak and short of breath, 
We simply take his job away 

And let him starve to death. 



Pension assessments will be increased 
5 per cent on Januray 1st. — N. B. 



VESTMENTS 

CHOIR AND CLERGY 


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10 



SERVICES TO BEGIN IN 
WEST ASHEVILLE 

After preliminary study and meetings 
with the clergy of Asheville and lay 
people interested in the work, it has been 
decided to organize a mission in West 
Asheville. This new work, which for the 
present will be under the personal direc- 
tion of Bishop Henry, will begin with 
services on January 15th. The Amer- 
ican Legion Hut has been secured for 
services. It has been found that there 
are 100 communicants in West Asheville 
who have given evidence of their interest 
in the new project. 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

OUR MAGAZINE 

POSSIBLE 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
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Trie Patterson School 




«jaiai£ ' Valley i 



Episcopal. School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of" Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. ?/iese, Supt . 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs, B, P„ Hollies : 
15 Edgenont Rd, , 
Asheville, N» C* 

SEWANEE SEMINARY 
SEEKS SUCCOR 

Last year only sixty-one parishes 
from seventeen dioceses in the Province 
of Sewanee gave to St. Luke's Seminary 
through the Theological Education Sun- 
day Offering. The total amount was 
#3,528.81. This is an extremely poor 
showing for a whole province of the 
Church which stands in constant need of 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 




pnest f l 

Bishop Henry has indicated to the 
Highland Churchman that his interest 
this year is centered on help for St. 
Luke's Seminary. It is hoped that every 
parish and mission in the Diocese will 
make a special effort to observe Theolog- 
ical Education Sunday in February, and 
that as far as possible the offering will 
be designated for the seminary at 
Sewanee. 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

IOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville. N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XX 



FEBRUARY, 1950 



No. 6 



We wish to announce that effective 



immediately the Reverend Robert 
McCloskey is editor of the Highland 
Churchman. All correspondence 



should be addressed to him at 



St. Andrews Church, Canton, N. C. 



Uty? iftgtjlanii 
GUjurrljman 

St. Andrews Church Ccnton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rev. M. George Henry, 
46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wrn. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDiTORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



An Expanding Diocese 

Elsewhere in this paper will be found 
an account of an interview with Bishop 
Henry which points out the many ways 
in which the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina is showing increasing strength. 
In almost every quarter one finds the 
evidence of a renewed zeal for the 
Church, a determination to let nothing 
stop the effort to minister to souls. And 
yet in the midst of this wave of en- 
thusiasm, there is always danger that 
some cautious ones may say, "But how 
can we afford it?" or "Wouldn't it be 
better to consolidate the gains we have 
already made?" The answer is to be 
found in the history of the Christian 
Church. Let the Church and the in- 
dividuals who make up that Church 
become cautious and careful of the gains 
already made and stagnation has always 
set in. It is not our intention to foster 
recklessness. W'e are all called to be 



missionaries but we are also called to 
be stewards. It will always behoove 
us to be able to give an able accounting 
of those things entrusted to us. But 
in these days when this whole section 
of the State bids fair to become the 
scene of great economic expansion, we 
dare not do less than meet the challen- 
ges placed before us and we cannot act 
too quickly. 



Great Day - March 12 

In less than a month from the time 
most of our readers see this there is 
going to be a single mighty effort to push 
forward the frontiers of the Episcopal 
Church's work throughout the world. 
At the last General Convention it be- 
came apparent that in order to meet 
the needs that were being put before 
the Church, a great increase in the bud- 
get would be necessary. To accomplish 
the goals set, an increase of over two 
million dollars was set. And it was 
proposed that this sum be raised in one 
great day's offering in every parish and 
mission of the Episcopal communion. 
On March 12th, Presiding Bishop Sher- 
rill will speak by radio to all congrega- 
tions and an offering will be taken. For 
Western North Carolina it will mean 
that $4,500 must be given. There 
should be no difficulty. 



Goodbye 

The retiring editor cannot resist the 
opportunity that is his to take this space 
to express his gratitude for the past 
years. It has been his happy privilege 
to be associated with the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina almost from 
the beginning of his priesthood. The 
friendships he has gained, the things he 
has learned and above all the sense of 
having belonged to an intimate family 
are the sources of greatest joy. 



Plan To Seize Opportunities and Meet Needs 

Now Urged 



Part of preparation for advance plan touching all mission fields and increasing 
largely the educational program throughout the Church; similar study per- 
iods will be devoted to missions at home and Christian education. 

During the month of January 1950, members of the Episcopal Church all 
through the land will make a serious study of that Church's missionary work 
overseas. In February a similar study will be made of missionary work at home, 
and in the early part ot March the study will be on the work of Christian education. 

This intensive study period, which is to reach every parish and mission of the 
Episcopal Church, is to make church members understand the need for a greatly 
increased budget for 1950, which was approved by the General Convention meet- 
ing in San Francisco last October. 

At the close of the study period on Sunday, March 12, the presiding bishop, 
the Rt. Rev. Henry Knox Sherrill, will make a radio address through a coast-to- 
coast network, directly to congregations in their parish churches. Radio receiving 
sets will be placed in the churches and at a certain point in the morning service, the 
presiding bishop will be heard, telling of needs and opportunities for advance in 
every phase of the Church's work, and urging increased giving to the Church's 
program of work by every Episcopal Church member. 

The radio hookup which will carry this message is to be one of the largest ever 
arranged for a religious message. 

The budget which the Episcopal Church is expecting to raise is #5,634,617 per 
year for the next three years. The budget for 1949 is $3,650,000. The increases 
are to provide more adequate missionary salaries, extensive enlargement of the 
work in Christian education, increased activities in Christian social relations, and 
increases in mission staffs, buildings and equipment, including the opening of a 
completely new missionary work on Okinawa. 

Leach Resigns As Editor McCloskey To Edit 

The Department of Promotion re- C<nurcnman 

grets the resignation of the Reverend Effective upon the departure of the 

Wilbur C. Leach as Editor. Mr. Leach Reverend Wilbur Leach, the Reverend 

has been faithful to his work at all times Robert McCloskey, Minister-in-Charge 

and we regret his leaving, even though of St. Andrew's Church in Canton will 

we would wish him the best of every become editor of the Churchman. Mr. 

happy thing in his venture towards the McCloskey is a relative newcomer to 

North. We know that St. Luke's our Diocese, but for many reasons we 

Chapel will be blessed in his coming believe he will be especially adept in 

and we hope that he and his family will this responsible position. We ask that 

be deeply happy there. all correspondence to the Editor be sent 

There have been many times when directly to him at St. Andrew's Church 

"printers devils" have pestered him and in Canton. 

indeed we would be remiss if we did not We also ask that all those interested 

indicate that occasionally the saints of in the future of the Diocese will co- 

the Church have not enabled him to operate in every way with the Editor 

meet his deadline. But he has dealt that the Churchman may grow in in- 

with both the saint and the sinner in rluence in the Diocese and that it may 

a remarkable spirit of charity and in a not only dessiminate news of the Diocese 

bond of fellowship. Godspeed to him but may strengthen and inspire the life 

and his. of the people. 

3 




Resigning Editor and Priest. 

Leach To Go To 
New York 

The Rev. W. C. Leach, for the past 
eight years priest in charge of Holy 
Cross, Valle Crucis and other missions, 
has resigned and will become a mem- 
ber of the staff of St. Luke's Chapel, 
New York City on February 1st. He 
came to the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina in February of 1942 from St. 
John's Church, Dover, N. J. Original- 
ly he had planned to go to the Philip- 
pines as a member of the mission staff 
which was being supported by General 
Theological Seminary, from which 
school he had graduated in 1941. 

For the first five years of his pastorate 
at Valle Crucis he was also in charge ol 
St. Luke's, Boone. St. Matthew's, Todd, 
St. Mary's, Beaver Creek and Holy 
Trinity, Glendale Springs. At the time 
of his resignation he was in charge of 
St. John the Baptist, Lower Watauga, 
St. Mary's, Blowing Rock. 



Fr. Leach served a three year term 
on the Executive Council. He has been 
Chairman of the Department of Pro- 
gram and Budget, Christian Education 
and Youth Commission. For the past 
three years he was editor of the High- 
land Churchman. 



Treasurer's Note 

To the right is the record for the year 
1949, and while it does not reconcile 
with the books of the Treasurer, it is 
nevertheless accurate. New York ad- 
vised us to close our books on January 
16th, but the receipts on the 18th-19th 
affected several places and so in order 
to make a better showing and present 
a prettier picture these arrears have 
been included in our receipts for 1949. 
The report could be better if every 
Mission and Parish had paid up in full, 
however, due to the fact that some 
places OVERPAID the total is a sat- 
isfactory showing. We are still having 
trouble over the Church Program Fund. 
Some call it Quota, some Missions, some 
Church Dues and others "our Assess- 
ment." In remitting if you will please 
place an X after your Assessment fig- 
ures, a Q after your Church Program 
we can easily understand these to mean 
Expense and Quota, and this would be 
most helpful. It now requires part of 
the wisdom of a Solomon to guess at 
the meaning of some of the remittances 
received. 

Let's make 1950 our best year yet 
both spiritually and financially, and in 
this connection it gives your Treasurer 
some satisfaction to note that the Rev. 
George H. Wieland D.D. has prepared 
The Missionary Imperative sermon — 
"Speak unto the Children of Israel that 
they go forward." This is the same text 
your Treasurer had the temerity to 
suggest to Bishop Henry last May at 
the Convention at Morganton, and the 
results in the awakening of this Diocese 
have been most gratifying. I'nder the 
guidance of our good Bishop let us 
continue to go forward. 

William M. Redwood, 
Treasurer 



RECEIVED BY 
CAROLINA 

January 

On Assesment For 
Support Of The Diocese 
Made Paid 
$1,315.00 $1,320.00 
322.00 351.30 
109.00 75.00 
1,170.00 1,170.00 
219.00 219.00 
130,00 130.00 
398.00 398.00 
410.00 410.04 
370.00 3 70.00 
334.00 334.00 
253.00 253.00 
216.00 216.00 
234.00 234.00 
580.00 580.00 
358.00 358.00 
729.00 729.00 
170.00 170.00 
103.00 103.00 


THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN N( 
FROM PARISHES AND MISSIO 
- 1st, 1949, to January 16th, 1950 

On Qu 

Program Of 
PARISHES Accepted 
Asheville, Tiinity - $ 2.519.00 


DRTH 
NS 

ota For 
The Church 
Paid 
$ 3,013.97 
858.83 
157.86 

2,235.52 
283.43 
250.00 
759.00 
866.78 
760.22 
635.84 
619.48 
412.00 
445.00 

1.323.02 
684.00 

1,391.00 
323.00 • 
196.00 






615.00 


Asheville, St. Matthias' 


— 


208.00 

. 2.232.00 
417.00 


Flat Rock, St. John's 


— 


250.00 

759.00 






775.00 


Hendersonville, St. James' _ 


— 


707.00 

637.00 






482.00 






412.00 






445.00 


Morganton, Grace 

Rutnerfordton, St. Francis' 
Tryon. Holy Cross 


— 


1.196.00 

684.00 


— 


1.391.00 

323.00 


Wilkesboro. St. Paul's 




196.00 


TOTAL 






$7,420.00 

68.00 
89.00 
36.00 
31.00 
30.00 
10.00 
39.00 

117.00 
30.00 
48.00 

114.00 
10.00 
19.00 
96.00 
10.00 
10.00 
13.00 
10.00 
80.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
26.00 
20.00 
12.00 
10.00 
23.00 
41.00 
10.00 
95.00 
22.00 
io. nn 
67.nn 

24.00 

fn.nn 
lo.on 

~8~.no 

22.00 

fo'.nn 

10.00 
$1,330.00 


$7,420.34 


$14,248.00 


$15,214.47 

85.00 
6.53 
68.00 
63.50 
57.00 
12.00 
47.00 

234.40 
63 .44 
94.00 

228.00 
12.00 
36.00 

108.94 
28.94 
36.92 

L2~00 
154.00 
12.00 
80.00 
12.00 

49.nn 

4~9~03 
20.87 
44.00 
7O.00 
3 5.00 

182.05 
42.00 
12.00 

253.45 

45.46 

5.50 

16~.34 

22.00 
75~61 

~8~.~5 


68.00 

3~6~00 
31.00 
30.00 
10.00 
39.00 

117.00 
30.00 
48.00 

114.00 
10.00 
19.00 
96.00 
11.20 
10.00 

fo'.oo 

80.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
26.00 
20.00 
12.00 
12.00 
23.00 
41.00 
10.00 
95.00 
22.00 
10.00 
67.00 
24.00 

fo.oo 

~8~00 
22.00 

iY.oo 


MISSIONS 
Arden, Christ School 





85.00 

110.00 


Asheville, St. Luke's 

Asheville. Trinity Chapel 
Bat Cave, Transfiguration 
Beaver Creek. St. Mary's 
Bessemer City. St. Andrew's 
Black Mountain. St. James' 
Blowing Rock. Stringfellow 

Boone. St. Luke's 

Canton, St. Andrew's 

Culowhee, St. David's 


— 


68.00 

60.00 




57.00 




12.00 




47.00 


- 


_ _ 224.00 
37.00 


— 


94.00 

218.00 

12.00 






36.00 


Franklin. St. Agnes 


— 


183.00 

12.00 






12.00 


Glendale Springs, Holv Tri 
High Shoals. St. John's _ 

Highlands. Incarnation 

Hot Springs. St. John's __ 
Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 
Lincolnton. St. Cvprian's 
Lincolnton. Woodsid". Our 
Little Switzerland. Resnrrec 

Morganton. St. Marv's 

Morganton. St. Stenhen's 
Murphv, Messiah 


lity 


17.00 

12.00 

154.00 

12.00 

80.00 




12.00 


Sa 
tion 


•io,,, 49.no 

~0.00 

60.00 

12.00 




44.00 


Rutnerfordton. St. Gabriel's 




79.00 




3 5.00 






182.00 


Svlvia. St. John's 

Todd. St. Matthew's 


— 


42.00 
12.00 


Valle Crucis. Holv Cross 

Asheville. Grace 

Blackstone. Mission _ 




134.00 


— 


46.00 


Cashiers. Good Shenherd 
Cherokee. St. Francis of Ass 
Dutch Creek. St. Anthonv 
F.dnevville. St. Peter's 


si 


10.00 
17.00 












Lincolnton, St. Stephen's 








12.00 


Morganton. St. Elizabeth's 
Pen! and. Good Shepherd 








42.00 


Trvon. Good Shepherd 
Upward. St. John Baptist 
Valle Crucis. St. John Bap 
Blackstone Mission 




12.00 
60.00 


tist 




GRAND TOTAL 


— 




$1,213.20 


$ 2,432.00 


$ 2.391.75 


$8,750.00 


$8,633.54 


$16,680.00 


$17,606.70 



Interview With Bishop Shows Steady Growth In Diocese 



In an exclusive interview granted the 
Highland Churchman, Bishop Henry 
reports a steady and encouraging grow- 
th in all departments of the diocesan 
life. Although thelre are yet many 
vacancies to be filled in missions 
throughout the Diocese, there is much 
interest on the part of laypeople which 
bodes well for the future. New mis- 
sions are being organized, churches are 
being built or planned for, and in one 
instance a church is being consecrated. 

The work in West Asheville is now 
moving toward the point where an or- 
ganized mission will soon be admitted 
into union with the Diocese. Although 
no name has been chosen yet, a good 
sized group has been meeting for serv- 
ices in the American Legion building, 
a Sunday School has been organized 
and officers have been elected. So far 
about 88 families have been reached, 
most of whom have not been taking an 
active part in parish activities. Mr. 
R. L. Nahikian is Warden, the treasurer 
is Mr. Fred Mutton, and Mr. Vernon 
Parker Sunday School superintendent. 

At the last meeting of the Executive 
Council, three new missions were ad- 
mitted into the Diocese. Grace Chapel, 
Asheville, Holy Comforter*, Andrews, 
and St. Barnabas, Murnhy. Mr. Ar- 
thur Brimley, a postulant for Holy 
Orders is lay reader in charge of Grace 
Chapel, his regular services mark the 
first time in three years since there has 
been services there. The organ has 
been electrified, a stoker has been in- 
stalled and many general repairs have 
been made. There is now a Sunday 
School with Mr. Porter Crisp as super- 
intendent. Holy Comforter Chapel 
meets in a room in the public library 
in Andrews. This seems to be more 
than just a temporary meeting- place, 
for the room is devoted exclusively to 
church services, with an altar, altar rail, 
seats and kneeling pads. Mr. William 
Bolton, lay-worker at Murphv is in 
charge of services under the direction 
of the Rev. A. R. Morgan. 



Mr. S. Grant Alexander of Asheville, 
an architect, has been retained by the 
Church of the Redeemer, Shelby, and 
has submitted plans for a new church 
there. It is estimated that the building 
will cost at least #25,000 and it is hoped 
that work can be started in the late 
Spring. 

On the afternoon of Sunday, April 
16th, St. Mark's Church, Gastonia, will 
be consecrated. It will be remembered 
that the congregation of St. Mark's 
bought the building formerly owned by 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian 
Church. In order to make the building 
suitable for liturgical worship, it was 
necessary to have extensive changes 
made. 

During 1949 there were 333 confirm- 
ations in the Diocese. This figure is 
greater than those for any one year in 
the past 16 years. The parishes and 
missions which have been outstanding 
in the number presented for confirm- 
ation are Transfiguration. Bat Cave, 14; 
St. Mary's, Asheville, 28; St. Paul's. 
Edneyville, 17; Calvary, Fletcher, 38; 
Grace, Morganton, 24; and Trinity. 
Asheville, 38. The Bishop points out 
that much of the rise in the number of 
people being confirmed is due to the 
efforts now being put forth by lay 
people. It is hoped that every church 
in the Diocese will set a goal of one 
tenth of its communicant strength each 
year. 

Miss Aline Cronshey, mission work- 
er at Edneyville, has just finished a 
survey of the work at St. John's, Up- 
ward, and it has been decided to reopen 
that work in the near future. 

At the request of the Board of Man- 
agers of Kanuga the Bishop commends 
to every congregation the giving of the 
Easter offering for the improvement of 
the Kanuga property. If in any place 
the Easter Offering is otherwise des- 
ignated, it is asked that some Sunday 
be set aside as a dav on which an offer- 
ing will be made for Kanuga. 



The Domestic Missionary Field 



By The Rt. Rev. Geoge H. Quart erman, 

S.T.D., Missionary Bishop of 

North Texas 

"We have a mighty sick young man 
here. You're the only minister he 
really knows. Can you come to see 
him?" The message came from a mis- 
sion congregation without clergy min- 
istration and 300 miles distant. A 600- 
mile sick call — that is domestic 
missions. Do you know that the 13 
domestic missionary districts have an 
area of 1,078,807 square miles? That 
is one-third of the total area of these 
United States. North Texas, for ex- 
ample, in area is one-and-one-half times 
the size of the state of New York. The 
bishop travels 24,000 miles annually 
in his visitations and ministrations. 
Only three times this year, except on 
holiday, he had Sunday dinner with 
his family. That's domestic missions. 



"Wh< 



do 



people 



,?» 



A 



friend flying in from the East asked 
that question. He saw few towns as 
he flew over the area. There are few. 
This is a town and countrv field. Some 
live on isolated ranches. The cities and 
towns are far apart. The mission clergy 
drive hundreds of miles each week to 
serve as many as five congregations. 
That's domestic missions. Do you know 
that the total poulation of the 13 mis- 
sionary districts is about the same as 
that of the state of Ohio? Separation 
by miles; isolation in family groups — 
yet one in the fellowship of Christ's 
Church. That's domestic missions. 

"Do you think we can have a res- 
ident priest in another year?" Mis- 
sion congregations continually ask that 
question. It brings anguish to the 
missionary bishops. How long can one 
say, "Possess your souls in patience?" 
Do you know that in 1948 the total ac- 
tive clergy in the domestic missionary 
field numbered 234? Praise God for 



them! They are devoted men on min- 
imum salaries, serving 97 parishes, 400 
organized missions and manning preach- 
ing stations in an area of more than 
one million miles. That's domestic 
missions. 

"This is the least we can do." So 
said the laymen in North Texas con- 
siding the advance missionary program. 
The "least" is a four hundred per cent 
increase in four years. The mission 
budget in 1946 was $5,000. In 1950 
it is $20,784. In addition, there is 
increasing self-support. The oper- 
ations budget in 1946 totalled $2,400. 
In 1950 it is $7,000. Other missionary 
districts can submit comparable figures. 
"Go Forward" — that is the direction of 
movement in the domestic mission field. 

"This month the Auxiliary president 
and vice-president and the Canvass 
chairman moved away." So reported a 
mission priest. "Moved away" is a 
familiar refrain in the domestic mission 
field. Much of our population is trans- 
ient. That hurts us, but brings wel- 
comed strength to established parishes 
and diocese. The cities live on the 
production of the rural field. Emigra- 
tion — that's characteristic of domestic 
missions. 

"Let us rise up and build." I wish 
that I might have the figures of actual 
building in all of the domestic field. I 
can only quote North Texas as an 
example of all missionary districts. 
The totals for the last triennium are: 6 
rectories and vicarages, 2 Church build- 
ings erected, 3 Church buildings en- 
larged and repaired, 2 mission halls 
built, 1 parish hall built. Three Church 
buildings were consecrated. Building 
for the service and worship of God. 
That's domestic missions. 

"Bishop, we have 12 persons who 
desire Confirmation. What can we do 
about that?" The query came from a 



newly organized mission without serv- 
ices of a priest. Lay evangelism brings 
in the harvest. The bishop gave the 
instructions over a period of ten weeks. 
The point is: the domestic field pre- 
sents a great opportunity which we 
must meet now. New missions are 
being organized, more should be and 
will be if the Church accepts its march- 
ing orders — "Go ye into all the world." 
Your missionary bishops are appalled 
by the inability to meet opportunities 
for Christ and His Church. Stand be- 
side us, go forward with us, by your 
support of the advance program. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

By Lenthe Rush Campbell 



Laymen of The Episcopal 
Church Club, Hickory 

The men of the Church of The As- 
cension met in the new parish house on 
November 21st for the first meeting of 
a new mens' club, following out the 
plans of the National organization of 
the laymens' work, headed by Harvey 
Firestone. 

Mr. Ervin Yount, the keyman for 
the parish, invited Mr. A. B. Stoney, 
keyman for the diocese, to be the first 
speaker. Mr. Stoney brought a very 
inspirational message, and gave the high 
lights concerning the history, purpose, 
and program of the movement to the 
forty-five laymen present. 

The dinner was served by the St. 
Catherine Circle of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary. It was decided to have a meet- 
ing once a month with the different 
circles of the auxiliary to serve dinner 
for the men on these occasions. 

The following officers were elected: 

Joe Wingo, President; Ervin Yount. 
Vice-President; Joe Cobb, Secretary- 
Treasurer; Marcus Little, Assistant 
Secretary. 



Worship Study Service Fellowship 

We are fast approaching one of the 
greatest days in which we as Christian 
women come together and make our- 
selves felt spiritually throughout the 
world. The great day, of course, is 
the World Day of Prayer. The next 
observance of which will be February 
24th and the theme is Faith For Our 
Time. At the Triennial Meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliary in 1946 a resolu- 
tion was passed encouraging women of 
the Episcopal Church to share in the 
work of the Councils of church women; 
this resolution says in part, "Every Wo- 
man's Auxiliary is urged to affiliate with 
the local Council of Church Women, 
and every woman asked to participate 
actively in the work of the Council. It 
is further recommended that if no such 
Council exists in a community, the wo- 
men of the Episcopal Church take the 
initiative in organizing local councils to 
be affiliated with the United Council of 
Church Women." The new secretary 
of the department of World Relations 
of the United Council of Church Wo- 
men is Miss Luella Reckmeyer, an 
Episcopalian. Mrs. Robert B. Camp- 
bell of Hickory is the chairman of 
Christian World Missions of the North 
Carolina Council of Church Women. 
This includes the World Day of Prayer. 
Dr. Alexis Carrel, one of our great 
scientist said in 1941 "Prayer is the 
most Powerful Form of energy that one 
can generate." The World Day of 
Prayer is one of the days The United 
Council sponsors. 

World Day of Prayer Material may 
be obtained from the United Council 
of Church Women, 156 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 10, New York. 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney our United Thank 
Offering Custodian, gives us the follow- 
ing interesting report: 



8 



A Dream Coming True 

In 1889 the first United Thank 
Offering was presented. It wasn't quite 
$500.00 but it was the beginning of 
that great dream of the thankful wo- 
men of our Church. 

In San Francisco $1,954,544.30 was 
laid upon the golden arms basin by wo- 
men from all over the world. With the 
estimated interest the offering will 
reach $2,000,000.00. 

The women of Western North Car- 
olina gave $12,688.69. This was $2,- 
688.69 more than was given during the 
last triennium. A splendid record but 
not good enough ! We won't be satis- 
fied until we know that every woman 
of every Parish and Mission has a Blue 
Box and uses it. 

One woman said, "Although my 
offering is small, I have added to it 
every day." She caught the vision. 
She was conscious every day of being 
thankful to God. The use of her Blue 



Box was the "outward and visible sign 
of that inward and spiritual grace." 

We are beginning a new triennium. 
Let's set ourselves a goal. Let's make 
a dream come true in our Diocese. See 
that every woman in your Parish or 
Mission has a United Thank Offering 
box, that she knows what it is for and 
how her offerings are spreading the 
Kingdom. 

Let us all give and pray with a deep 
sense of thankfulness for every day 
happiness, for special blessings, for 
strength in times of need. Then the 
dream will come true! 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney 

Diocesan United Thank Offering 
Custodian 



More than 500,000 teachers and 
scholars in 5,107 Church Schools — in- 
creases in the trieunium of 22.9% 
pupils, 17.6% teachers, 4.1% schools. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr., O.GJ5. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

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Clergy Hear Heuss 

The clergy of the Diocese absented 
themselves from their churches on Jan- 
uary 18th and 19th to attend a Con- 
ference in the See City at the invitation 
of the Bishop. Dr. John Heuss, Exec- 
utive Secretary of the National Council's 
Department of Christian Education, 
spent two days with the clergy going 
over the work of that department which 
has been measureably increased by ac- 
tion of the last two General Conventions. 
Many valuable leads were given con- 
cerning techniques and administration 
of Christian Education on a local level, 
however Dr. Heuss' greatest contribution 
was his firm and straightforward pres- 



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entation of the philosophy of Christian 
Education. Episcopalians need not fear 
the mistakes made by similar depart- 
ments in other Communions where 
emphases went to extremes; on the con- 
trary, the approach of the expanded 
program in our department will balance 
established truth with modern methods 
of approach; these elements being in 
compliment rather than at odds. Pre- 
views were given of the new curricula of 
the department; the first official pub- 
lications of the Dept. of Christian 
Education of the National Church were 
reviewed. The sincere sight of our fail- 
ure as a Church to measure up to the 
task of Christian Education in the past 
was overshadowed by the knowledge 
that we were "doing something about it 
now". Dr. Heuss warned the clergy 
that although new materials were being 
developed, it would be at least four years 
before they would be presentable, and, 
that in the meanwhile, we should ex- 
amine our present programs and work 
with what we had. The Diocesan Com- 
mittee on Christian Education urged 
that all churches in the Diocese follow 
as closely as possible the approved 
"interim materials" until the new ma- 
terials were completed by National 
Council. In spite of the great inade- 
quacies in our religious education work, 
the Conference caught the spirit of the 
Advance in the Church, and saw a 
vision of greater days ahead. 

The clergy were the guests of Bishop 
Henry while in Asheville. The sessions 



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10 



of the Conference were held in Diocesan 
Headquarters and fine meals were ser- 
ved by the women of Trinity, St. Mary's 
and All Souls. On Thursday morning 
the Bishop celebrated Holy Commun- 
ion at St. Marv's Church. 



Christianity does not consist in ab- 
staining from things that no gentleman 
would think of doing, but in doing 
things that are unlikely to occur to any- 
one who is not in touch with the Spirit 
of Christ. 

— H. R. L. Sheppard 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

OUR MAGAZINE 

POSSIBLE 



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11 



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MR. CAPERS GRANTED 
LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

The Rector of Holy Cross Church, 
Tryon, has been granted leave of ab- 
sence by his loyal congregation in 
order to have time for a more complete 
recovery from illness. In order to in- 
sure the steady round of services which 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



has marked Holy Cross' schedule since 
Air. Capers came, the Rev. Newton 
Middleton has been secured as locum 
tenens. Since the first of the year Dr. 
Middleton has been in residence in Try- 
on. A weekly bulletin is issued and 
among the items noted was the one re- 
porting the Rector's steady improve- 
ment. 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

AshevUIe, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 
An Zpisropal School for Girls owned by 



the 



five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th. 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Rel igious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
-indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 





MID- 
LENT 
ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XX 



MARCH, 1950 



No. 7 




ALMIGHTY God, whose most dear Son went 
not up to joy but first He suffered pain, and 
entered not into glory before He was crucified; 
Mercifully grant that we, walking in the way 
of the cross, may find it none other than the 
way of life and peace; through the same thy Son 
Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 



Sty? lftgijlan& 
QUfurrtjmatt 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 

Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey. Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins- — — -Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms —-Bus, Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville jte,T . C. , 

Robert Putnam A Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm ^Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



Easter Offering 

The giving of our Easter Offering for 
property improvement at Kanuga has 
been commended by the Board of Man- 
agers through our Bishop. Although 
the Managers did not wish to force our 
action in any way, the request could 
have been made more emphatically, for, 
the need is very great. Operating costs 
through the last few years have hinder- 
ed even normal property repair, so that 
the physical condition of Kanuga is al- 
most critical. The property is geo- 
graphically located in our Diocese, and 
through the years has immeasureably 
enriched and influenced the life of the 
Church in this Diocese. It will continue 
to do so in increasing proportions. The 
least we can do is to receive whole- 
heartedly the commendation of the 
Managers and follow the suggestion. If 
the Easter Offering has been otherwise 
designated in your Church, set aside 
another Sunday's offering for Kanuga. 



It's Later Than You Think 

More credible than not is a fictitious item clipped from a sometime news- 

'ANYTOWN, U.S.A., Feb. 22.— The people of St. Vitis Church-by-the- 
Gas-Station held their annual Shrove Tuesday frolic last evening in the 
parish house. Music for dancing was furnished by a fine orchestra; the 
most popular tune was the recent hit, "Enjoy yourself; it's later than you 
think". At the stroke of twelve, the group quietly processed to the near-by 
Church where the Penitential Offices for Ash Wednesday were read. As 
in these traditional Offices, the congregation joined with the minister in 
the great intercession, "Spare thy people . . . and let not thine heritage be 
brought to confusion . . ." 

Lest this item bring us to confusion, let us make haste to examine it. The title 
to the current radio and juke-box hit tune, "Enjoy yourself; it's later than you 
think", although wedded to non-canonical music, is never-the-less doctrinally 
sound. Before you question such a rash statement, re-examine the word "enjoy". 
"Enjoyment" entails "happiness" and "happiness" has a familiar Gospel ring — 
the Greeks and the Hebrews had a word for it, namely, "blessedness". It is later 
than we think, and we should enjoy ourselves — enjoy ourselves in terms of true 
Christian happiness. Isaiah reminds Israel that penitential fasting of an inward 
and selfish nature makes one irritable and very unhappy; that true penitence de- 
mands not only denial of self, but an outpouring of self to others. We need not 
be reminded that our Lord was concerned about true blessedness; His Cruci- 
fixion was evidence of that. The Apostle writes of Him as the One, "who for the joy 
that was set before Him, endured the cross . . ." 



The Bishop's Message 



In the Introduction of the Book of Common Prayer, there is a Table of Fasts, 
in which is mentioned the Forty Days of Lent. 

In this Table of Fasts, there is given direction by the Church as to how we 
should keep these Fasts. 

There is stated: u Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, The Forty Days of Lent, 
Ember Days, all Fridays in the year, except Christmas Day and The Epiphany, 
or any Friday which may intervene between these Feasts, and other days of Fast- 
ing, on which The Church requires such a measure of Abstinence as is more espec- 
ially suited to Extraordinary Acts and Exercises of Devotion. 1 ' You will notice 
"especially suited". 

Too often I hear of Lenten Observance which is negative and seemingly has 
no purpose. It is "especially suited" to nothing except our self-righteous Pharisa- 
ism. Would it not be well for us to take stock of ourselves — to make this a 
personal Lent — by bringing to light the ways in which we have failed the Church 
in not living up to the Vows we took when we were Baptized and Confirmed; how 
we have professed, not practiced, our Faith, and, yes, how we have "wrapped in a 
napkin" the talents God has given us, instead of using them: Having thus exam- 
ined ourselves, would it not be well for all of us to set forth for ourselves "extra- 
ordinary Acts and Exercises of Devotion 1 , which we intend to undertake, during 
this Lenten Season, and, then, set up "such a measure of Abstinence as is more 
especially suited" to these particular undertakings? 

In such an enlarged participation in the forward movement of the Church, 
our spiritual lives will be deepened, for we will be bringing ourselves under the 
discipline of the Church, by exerting self-discipline. We will be proving to our- 
selves, and to others, the true value of the practices and teachings of the Church; 
we will be "bearing witness" in a concrete, convincing way; our penitence will be 
real, not a sham. In this way, our Lenten Observance will be positive in its 
emphasis. 

The Advance and Christian Education 

By the Rev. Canon Vesper O. Ward veral adult generations had failed to 

Editor in Chief of Curriculum De- communicate the Christian Faith to the 

partment of Christian Education, rising generation. Sensing this fact in 

The Natilonal Council. a vague way, our people have demanded 

The General Convention of 1835 better curriculum materials. The Gen- 
marked a turning point in the life of eral Convention of 1946 instructed the 
the Episcopal Church. Out of the mis- National Council, through its new De- 
sionary conviction which was born at partment of Christian Education, to 
that time this Church came to a position provide approved curriculum materials. 
of unique leadership and responsibility. The implications of these instructions 
But after a century of missionary in- became a crucial issue at the General 
terest and expension our people began Convention of 1949. Not since 1835 has 
to lose the vision of 1835. In addition, this Church been aroused so unanimous- 
baptismal and confirmation vows seem- ly about any issue as it has been about 
ed irrelevant to many of us and to some the necessity for educational reform, 
the basic ideology and language of the The Christian Faith cannot be corn- 
worship and sacraments of the Church municated by teaching the facts of re- 
became a foreign tongue. ligion to children. It can only be 

What explains this state of spiritual communicated by adults for whom Jesus 

apathy? Christ is Lord. Furthermore, this pro- 

For one thing it was evident that se- cess of communication begins even be- 



fore a child is born and continues 
throughout his life. So the basic ques- 
tion is not what shall we teach our 
children, but by what kind of people 
and under what conditions are the 
children to be taught: Converted adults 
are the key to a relevant program of 
Christian Education. If this conviction 
is well founded we are driven to re- 
consider the Church's leadership capac- 
ities. This raises the question of how 
effectively we have been using good 
educational tools that are already at 
hand. What is the educational relevance 
of baptism, confirmation and holy 
matrimony? 

Leadership training, beginnnig with 
the clergy, has been established as a 
prerequisite for curriculum develop- 
ment. While this program is getting 
under way the professional editorial 
staff has been concerned with discover- 
ing how children learn and reviewing 
ways of helping a curriculum come to 
life at the parish level. The results of 
the steps that have been outlined above 
have led the Department to think of 
the shape of the new curriculum in 
terms of a parent-parish relationship to 
every member of the Church throughout 
the whole of his life experience. The 
church-home readers, the guides for 
parents and teachers, audio-visual aids, 
etc., will all be developed around the 
idea that the child is being educated in 
religion by everyone who touches his 
life. The curriculum consists of this 
total structured, guided and enriched 
experience. 

You have sensed already that this 
program is no easy panacea. It must 
come to life in the homes and parishes 
of the Church if it is to produce re- 
sults. This will require patient and 
painstaking preparation on the part of 
the clergy, teachers, parents, and parish 
leaders. 

The Church calls us again to enter 
the school of Christ and to become act- 
ive participants in God's drama of 
salvation that we may know in redemp- 
tive reality the love of Christ which 
passeth knowledge. 



Convocations 



Convocation of Morganton 

The pre-Lenten meeting of the Con- 
vocation of Morganton was held on 
Wednesday, February 15th, at St. 
Mark's Church, Gastonia. Holy Com- 
munion was celebrated by the Dean of 
the Convocation, the Rev. Peter W. 
Lambert, jr., assisted by the Rev. Wil- 
liam C. Cravner, Rector of St. Marks'. 
The Quiet Day Meditations were ably 
presented by the Rev. W. H. Anthony, 
Ph.D., priest-in-charge of the Church 
of the Redeemer, Shelby. Fr. Lambert 
conducted a short business session of 
the Convocation at luncheon. 



Convocation of Asheville 

The Convocation of Asheville met on 
February 15th and 16th at St. James 
Church, Black Mountain; Dean A. 
Rufus Morgan, presided; Mr. William 
F. Tyndall was Secretary. In the busi- 
ness session on the 15th, reports on 
missionary activitiy in the Convocation 
indicated that the Triennial Advance 
of the Church was truly "grass-roots". 
Particularly heartening were the reports 
of the work in the extreme Western 
field and in the greater Asheville area. 
(See Highland Churchman, Feb. 
1950, p. 6). Speaking for the Depart- 
ment of Promotion, the Rev. John W. 
Tuton urged that the Advance would 
go forward only if the people of the 
Church were informed; that each parish 
and mission should use the suggestions 
forwarded from the National Council. 
The Bishop reported on the state of the 
Kanuga property and the program for 
the coming summer. The exact needs 
are mentioned elsewhere in this issue 
of the Highland Churchman. Bishop 
Henry urged that the needs of Kanuga 
must be met if it would continue to 
maintain its prominent position in the 
life of the Church. The Convocation 
deferred the election of a new Dean and 
secretary until the Fall meeting which 
(Continued on Page 11) 



LAYMEN AT WORK 



All over the United States, men who 
are members of the Episcopal Church 
have been holding meetings with the 
vestries and mission committees in the 
local churches, giving them what has 
been called "a package presentation of 
the work of the Church". The twelve 
hundred laymen who led these meetings 
have all had a thorough intensive train- 
ing course, utilizing the most modern 
techniques, to fit them for their meet- 
ings with vestrymen. This is the first 
time in the history of the Episcopal 
Church that so large a number of 
trained laymen have undertaken such 
a project. 

As you know, the Episcopal Church 
has planned a program of advance 
which will require a much larger budget 
than in 1949. To assure that the new 
larger budget for 1950 will be raised, a 
Church-wide effort is being made to 
make sure that every member of the 
Church shall learn about the program 
of work and expansion, understands it, 
and believes in it to the extent of back- 
ing it financially. 

An outstanding job was done in this 
Diocese during January by the nine 
laymen who took the special training 
course in the Churches' program and 
budget. These men are: Bill Balthis, 
Jordan Brown, Ed Hartshorn, Beekman 
Huger, Allen Jones, E. L. Kemper, Cary 
Page, Ralph Todd and A. B. Stoney. 

Presentations varying in length from 
one to two hours were made by these 
laymen to every Vestry and Mission 
Committee in the Diocese. The pic- 
ture of the whole church with its ex- 
panding program and emphasis on 
evangelism was discussed at length with 
these groups with the result that many 
of our Church men now have, for the 
first time, a reasonably accurate know- 
ledge of what our Church is doing and 
hopes to do. 



Bishop Henry has decided to appoint 
all these laymen as Key-Men-at-Large 
with full membership on the Presiding 
Bishop's Committee for Laymen's Work 
in this Diocese. This is a well deserved 
recognition of an outstanding job faith- 
fully and brilliantly performed. 

The Bishop tells us that he needs 
more lay readers at once. Therefore, 
our suggestion is that you approach 
your Rector and your Laymen's Group 
with a project of Layreader's training. 

Your Rector can and will give your 
men the simple coaching necessary in 
the use of the Prayer Book. Any aver- 
age layman can quickly become a qual- 
ified lay reader. We do not hope to 
produce brilliant preachers — -just plain 
ordinary churchmen who will help to 
keep the church doors open and peo- 
ple in their pews. The Lord will accept 
a very imperfect performance if an 
humble Christian Spirit goes into it. 

The news of the Laymens work of 
the Episcopal Church in the Diocese is 
carried in a bulletin. Keystone Com- 
ments, sent to all "key men" in the 
parishes and missions of the Diocese. 
Mr. Stoney reports in the February 
Bulletin that the only reports filed from 
local key-men to his office have been 
from the men of Trinity Chapel, Haw 
Creek, and Grace Church, Morganton. 
These reports follow: 

"The men of Trinitv, Haw Creek, 
had their Corporate Communion in 
November with eieht attending. Ten 
dollars was sent to Mr. B. H. Sumner. 

"On Tuesday night, Januarv 31, 
there was a joint meeting of St. Tames, 
Black Mountain; St. Lukes, Chunns 
Cove; and Trinity Chapel, at Haw 
Creek. Supper was served by the ladies 
of the Auxiliary." 

(Continued on Page 8) 



5 



YOUTH NEWS 



By Mary Aston Leavell 

Hickory 

The young people meet every Sunday 
night in the Parish House, the Woman's 
Auxiliary iserving the supper. They 
have purchased beautiful furniture for 
the Rector's study. A party was given 
for the students home from college and 
the young people had a table at the 
annual Christmas bazaar. 

Hendersonville 

The Young Churchmen have been 
active. They have sent a Bible to a 
church in Sylva, N. C, and they have 
organized a Junior Altar Guild which 
meets every Saturday at 4:00 P. M. 
They have also started to form a li- 
brary. A novel idea was suggested by 
this group in that when they answer 
the roll, they say a verse from the 
Bible. I might say the Hendersonville 
News Editor sent in some news without 
prompting. Some of the others of us 
might take note. 

Morganton 

The young people recently elected 
Ariail Boggs and Bette Davis as their 
new group leaders. At Thanksgiving 
they took a basket to a needy family. 
Members serve on the Altar Guild and 
help keep the nursery during church. 

Diocesan Camp 

The Youth Commission of the Dio- 
cese held a meeting at Grace Church 
Rectory, Morganton, tfhe evening of 
February 4th. Those present were: 
The Rev. G. M. Jenkins, Chairman, 
Miss Clara Kate Boggs, Miss Nancy 
Barber, Miss Aline Cronshey, the Rev. 
Messrs. Robert McCloskey, Rhett 
Winters, C. G. Leavell, and Miss Mary 
Aston Leavell. The main matter of 
business was making plans for, and ar- 
ranging for leadership at, the Diocesan 
summer camp for Young Churchmen. 



The Rev. G. M. Jenkins was elected 
Director of the Camp, with the Rev. C. 
G. Leavell, Vice-Director. The dates 
were set as July 2nd-8th, and the place 
Patterson School, as of yore. Several 
courses were suggested to the Director 
at this meeting, such as "Knowing the 
Will of God", "How to Read the Bible", 
and "Young Peoples' Programs." 

Provincial Commission 

The Provincial Youth Commission 
held its mid-winter meeting on February 
17th-19th at Holy Trinity Church, 
Decatur, Georgia. All of the Dioceses 
in the Province of Sewanee were repre- 
sented except three. On February 17th 
we heard diocesan reports giving de- 
tails of the youth work in each diocese. 
Then the next day we heard the report 
of the National Youth Commission 
meeting which was held in Racine, Wis. 
According to the report from the Na- 
tional Youth Commission, next year's 
"Plan", which many of us have failed 
to use this year as a basis for programs, 
is going to be put in simpler language 
so that more people will use it in their 
youth groups. Next year "PLAN" will 
stress the fundamental teachings of the 
Bible and the Prayer Book. I'm afraid 
that many of us really don't know as 
much about these two books as we 
should, and I hope that you will try to 
use "Plan" next year. If you are on 
the Youth Leader's Mailing List, you 
will receive a copy. Otherwise send 
in your order for your copy to "Youth 
Division", 281 Fourth Avenue, New 
York 10, New York. 

After the report of the National 
Youth Commission we had special com- 
mittee meetings. The date for the 
Provincial Youth Convention was set 
as August 28th-September 2nd. The 
Convention will be held in Monteagle, 
Tennessee. The Commission meeting 
ended with our attendance at the morn- 
ing service on Sunday, February 19th. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Lent he Rush Campbell 
Worship Study Service Fellowship 

May we during the Lenten Season 
offer ourselves to God with these words: 
"0 Lord, I offer and present unto Thee, 
myself, my soul and body to be a 
reasonable, holy and living sacrifice 
unto Thee this day. LIse me as Thou 
wilt, when Thou wilt, where Thou wilt 
and with whom Thou wilt." 

Mrs. Haden, our Educational Secre- 
tary writes from Florida that she would 
like for "all women in the branches to 
order for their own personal use, the 
copy of the meditation, used by Dr. 
Theodore P. Ferris at Triennial. The 
booklet is 'His Holy Fellowship' and 
can be secured from National Council 
for 15 cents per copy". 

Mrs. Mary Craven, our Secretary for 
Christian Social Relations brings us the 
following report: 

"The aim of the Christian social re- 
lations program for this Triennium is to 
make Christianity come alive in our 
homes, parishes and communities. It 
has to do with our living and acting as 
Christians in our own locales. All want 
harmony — we want peace — we want 
tolerance. The essence of harmony, 
peace and tolerance is cohesion — not 
division. We must realize what men 
have in common and what can bring 
them together in a Christian way. This 
must begin at home. Our first aim 
should be to re-invigorate the Christian 
home and let activities branch out from 
that source. Perhaps none of us can 
do anything on a grand scale. But we 
can work for and with our people in 
our parishes and communities. It isn't 
national leaders we need so much as 
men and women of Christian good will 
in each of the little towns of America. 
Try to keep your community a decent 
place by being a correct and Christian 
citizen yourself. And we must all re- 
member that the title 'Christian Social 



Relations' covers all relations of our 
daily life — the problem is for us to make 
them Christian". 

Suggestions for your Lenten reading: 
The Atoning Life, Nash; The Words of 
Life, Dawley; Christ's Victory and 
Ours, Grant; The Man Born to be King, 
Sayers; The Man From Nazareth, 
Fosdick; The Daily Altar, Morrison and 
Willett. 



WOMENS U.T.O. SPRING 
PRESENTATIONS 

The Feast of the Annunication, March 
25th, is the time of our corporate com- 
munions for the spring presentations 
of the United Thank Offering. If this 
date is not convenient to your rector 
please have him set a date as near 
March 25th as possible. 

This year we are endeavoring to find 
out exactly the number of women par- 
ticipating. We would suggest each wo- 
man putting a slip of paper with her 
name upon it in the alms basin when she 
makes her offering. This would en- 
able you to get the exact number and 
would keep the amount of a woman's 
offering private. 

Western North Carolina has bene- 
fited so much from the United Thank 
Offering in the past and present. We 
gave $12,688.69 in San Francisco for 
the last Triennium but that doesn't 
cover the benefits we have received from 
the offering. We have four women 
workers in this diocese whose salaries 
come from this offering. The beautiful 
Church of St. Francis of Assissi at 
Cherokee, a clergy house to be built at 
the same place, a combination library 
and community center at Saluda, the 
renovation of Gard Hall at Patterson 
School, have all been made possible in 
our diocese through the LInited Thank 
Offering during the last three years. It 
is plain to see why the women of West- 
ern North Carolina should be thankful 
one hundred per cent. 



New Reredos At Waynesville 

Grace Church in the Mountains, 
Waynesville, is happy to anounce the 
recent dedication by the Bishop of the 
Diocese of a new reredos in their 
Church. The fine proportions of the 
carved oak were well-designed by 
William MacCollum in keeping with the 
existent architecture. The work was 
executed by the craftsmanship of Wal- 
ter and Robert Hill. Messrs. Mac- 
Collum, and Hills are members of the 
Congregation. The reredos is a me- 
morial to Miss Theodora Meta Adams, 
a beloved communicant of the parish 
for many years; it was presented by 
her family. 

Canton Church Installs Organ 

St. Andrews Church, Canton, recently 
installed a new Wurlitzer Organ in the 
Church, and retired the old reed organ 
which had wheezed through many serv- 
ices. The minister to St. Andrews re- 
ports, for the benefit of those who are 
considering a new organ, that this in- 



strument is much more suitable for lit- 
urgical worship than some electronic 
organs seem to be. At any rate, St. 
Andrews' is proud of the new acquisition, 
for it has raised the level of common 
worship and praise of the congregation. 

LAYMEN AT WORK 

(Continued from Page 5) 
Grace Church in Morganton reports: 
"Grace Church chapter of the Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew has made pledges 
totaling $3,930 toward the $50,000 im- 
provement project proposed for Patter- 
son School at Happy Valley. The sur- 
prising response throughout the Parish 
totaled $8,055. 

"Don Van Noppen, solicitor for 
Grace Parish, states that more contri- 
butions are being received and that he 
has as his goal $10,000 from the Parish. 
"The success of the drive within the 
Brotherhood was due in great part to 
the offer of a member who asked to 
remain anonymous to match any 
amount given by other brothers." 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Hymnal 1940 Companion; Book of Common 
Prayer; A Prayer Book for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy, lay officials 
and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, and their 
immediate families. Services include individual insurance programming 
and assistance to parish officials in preparing and establishing plans 
for retirement of lay employees. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire, windstorm and extended coverage. Insurance on prop- 
erty owned by or closely affiliated with the Church, and on the resi- 
dences and personal property of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 

20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



The Editor Speaks: 



The new editor cannot resist the op- 
portunity to say "hello" to the readers 
of the Highland Churchman. He 
trusts his modest talents will not dimin- 
ish the place this publication holds in 
the life of the Diocese. The purpose of 
the Highland Churchman is establish- 
ed; perhaps the readers have some com- 
fort in knowing that even though Editors 
come and go like itinerant missionaries, 
the Diocesan paper goes forward! 

There are some facts you should be 
acquainted with concerning your pub- 
lication. First, it works on a very 
limited budget, therefore its size, for- 
mat, and art work is accordingly limited. 
We make haste to add that we are get- 
ting much more for our dollars worth 
than many similar papers could hope 
for. When more money can be ap- 
propriated for The Highland Church- 
man, then and only then can these 
physical factors of its make-up be 
expanded. Second, as an official pub- 
lication of the Diocese, it should give 



an honest picture of the state of Christ's 
Church in this Diocese. To give such 
an honest picture we must have NEWS. 
Too often this news is not sent to the 
Editor. We urge you to take account 
of this phase of stewardship: "Key- 
men''' in the laymen's work should send 
in regular reports to Mr. Stoney; pro- 
motional chairmen in the local Womens 
Auxiliaries should send news to Mrs. 
Campbell, regularly; young people's 
officers should forward their news to 
Miss Leavell; the clergy should not be 
too modest about newsworthy items in 
their parish programs. There should 
be a healthy balance between Diocesan 
items and information concerning the 
total program of the larger Church — 
often times the Editor has had prac- 
tically no news from the parishes and 
missions. To that degree The High- 
land Churchman is what you make it. 
The Editor and Editors will wel- 
come at all times your suggestions and 
criticisms. 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6 3 /s". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



Church School Lenten 
Offering 

The Convocation of Asheville in 
Spring session set aside the days of 
April 22nd and 23rd as the time for the 
presentation of the Church School Len- 
ten Offerings. For the western area of 
the Convocation, the children and youth 
of the several Church Schools will meet 
at the Church of the Incarnation, High- 
lands, on Saturday afternoon, April 
22nd. The presentation for the Church 
Schools in the Eastern area of the Con- 
vocation will be held at Calvary Church, 
Fletcher, on the following afternoon, 
the Second Sunday after Easter, at 4 
P. M. 

Bishop Henry will be the preacher 



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at both presentations. Further details 
will be forthcoming in the next issue of 
the Highland Churchman. It is hoped 
that the Offering this year will indicate 
that the Church Schools of the Diocese 
are growing in proportion to the ex- 
panded work of the whole Church. 

Other Dioceses 

The Convocation of the Missionary 
District of Haiti met at Trinity Cathed- 
ral, Port-au-Prince, and voted to send 
a cable to the National Council, "an- 
nouncing enthusiastic acceptance of the 
quota for 1950." 

The diocese of Southern Ohio has 
completed its Every Member Canvass, 
and will increase its missionary giving 
for 1950 by 26 per cent over 1949. The 
full budget was presented in the reg- 
ular fall canvass, instead of presenting 
the 1950 increased budget through a 
special campaign treminating in March. 
The diocesan expectation was set at 
£112,000, an increase of $25,089. 

The diocese of Delaware will increase 
its giving for 1950 by 50 per cent. "I 
wonder whether any other diocese has 
voluntarily increased its giving to the 
general Church by 50 per cent?" in- 
quires Bishop Arthur R. McKinstry of 
Delaware. Many of the Delaware con- 
gregations, after completing their Every 
Member Canvasses, wired Presiding 
Bishop Sherrill that they were, pledg- 
ing the increased quota and expressing 
loyalty to the new, enlarged program of 
the Church for the next triennium. 



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PH1LA 




10 



CONVOCATION OF ASHEVILLE 

(Continued from Page 4) 

meets at Highlands. One hundred dol- 
lars was designated by the Convoca- 
tion to go into the student work at St. 
David's Mission, Culowhee, the location 
of Western Carolina Teachers College. 
On Wednesday evening, the Convoca- 
tion sermon was delivered by the Rev. 
G. Mark Jenkins; the Bishop, the Dean, 
and the minister of St. James' Church 
assisted in the service. 

On Thursday, the Bishop was the 
Celebrant at the 8 A. M. Holy Com- 



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Tfie Patterson School 



Episcopal. School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. <7iese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



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11 



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munion. Beginning at 10 A. M. and 
continuing until 1 P. M., Quiet Day 
Meditations were conducted by the 
Bishop. The meditations were based 
on the pre-Lenten Collects and brought 
the closing of the Convocation to a 
spiritual high point. 

SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



The good people of Trinity Chapel, 
Haw Creek, and St. James', Black 
Mountain, under the leadership of the 
Rev. N. C. Duncan, were exceptionally 
good hosts and hostesses for the dele- 
gates to the Convocation, and received 
the hearty thanks of the Convocation. 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School (or Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Rel it'ious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



Churchman 



VOL. XX 





APRIL 1950 



No. 8 



lEaster (Eanttrk 

V^HRIST our Passover is sacrificed for us: 
therefore let us keep the feast. Not with old 
leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and 
wickedness; but with the unleavened bread 
of sincerity and truth . . . 

Christ is risen from the dead . . . Like- 
wise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead in- 
deed unto sin, but alive unto God through 
Jesus Christ our Lord . . . 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



Stye 3ftgljlan& 
dljurrtjman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop. The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood. 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev, Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park. Asheville, N. C. 



28th Annual Convention 

The Church of the Ascension, Hick- 
ory, will be the scene of the annual Dio- 
cesan Convention on May 10th and 1 1th. 
HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN readers 
will learn more of program details in the 
weeks to come. The convention will hear 
President Harold L. Trigg of St Augus- 
tine's College discuss "Christian Race 
Relations" on Wednesday evening. An 
important spot on the agenda will be 
the presentation of the proposed budget, 
for undoubtedly the budget will reflect 
the growing life of the Church in the 
Diocese. The convening of the conven- 
tion in Hickory will give the delegates 
opportunity to see the fine new edifice of 
the Church of the Ascension. Clergy, lay 
delegates, and observers should make 
every effort to attend this important 
convention; the 28th since the organiza- 
tion of the Diocese from a missionary 
district. 



OVER THE TOP 

Our Diocese was asked to meet a goal of $4,500 on March 12th as our share in 
this years portion of the $2,000,000 Advance ordered by the San Francisco Triennial. 
At this writing, the offerings in the Diocese for that day total $6,-177.85 — over $1,600 
beyond expectations. Late returns will probably bring the total to over $6,500! 
Though we ought not to be too self-complacent about this accomplishment, never- 
theless it gives us reason to rejoice. It indicates that the "laymens movement" is 
not merely a "paper organization" set up by National Council, but rather a con- 
structive force in the life of the church on Diocesan and local levels. Our Diocesan 
Committee on Laymens Work deserve laurels for their effective presentation to the 
parishs and missions of the Advance needs. It also indicates that our local Church 
program, although enjoying much "congregational" freedom, never-the-less is a 
total program of the whole of the Church; the promotion of the Advance by the 
clergy of our churches is not insignificant. Finally it indicates that Episcopalians 
throughout our Diocese are not only aware of the needs of the total program of the 
Church but are willing to assume their share of those needs, yes, more than their 
share. Although the Advance program to date has been one of fiscal consideration, 
we ought to remember that the phase of Christian Education involves more than 
our dollars; it involves our wills and stewardship in Christ's Church. If the March 
12th Offering is an indication of our direction, then we can truly expect to find a 
new spirit continuing to grow in the Church, especially as it concerns our mandate 
to pass on to others the truth of the Gospel as it is revealed in the Body of Christ, 
which is the Church. 



The Bishop's Message 



HE IS RISEN!! HE IS RISEN INDEED!! It has been with these words that 
Christians for centuries have greeted Easter Day. Let us see why in these words 
Christians have always found hope and joy, and with them have sought eagerly to 
tell others the "good news." 

Some Christians feel that Christmas is the more important feast of the Church. 
They feel strongly that we should celebrate Christmas even more than Easter be- 
cause there we know that God is expressing His love for mankind by coming into 
the world. They feel that no greater love can be shown than that God would be will- 
ing to come into the world, limited as man is, and exposed to man's temptation and 
death. 

Yet, Easter includes all that Christmas does, for it is in the last week of our 
Lord's Earthly life, that we see to what ends God will go to reveal himself to Man, 
and to what ends He will go to bear the brunt of Man's sin. But here on Easter Day, 
we have not only the teaching of the extreme love of God in going even to the 
Cross, but the further joy that HE IS VICTORIOUS. 

The finest teacher in the world might try to teach me, but if that teacher were 
not able to teach me, then even her failure would be more discouraging to me. If 
I am crying for help in a pounding surf, and cannot possibly reach land, and some- 
one comes out to help me, and I don't think that person can possibly overcome 
the power of the whirling water, I am more discouraged than helped. But if I am 
sure that the teacher or the life-saver can overcome all of the difficulties in which 
I am involved, then it is "good news" to know that such strength is available, . . . 
yes even brought to me. 

He is Risen! He is risen indeed! This is the cry of the Victorious Christian who 
knows that despite the seeming strength of evil in this world, that evil is over- 
come . . . That despite the seeming finality and victory of death, God in Christ is 
victorious, and that we are partakers of His victory. 

Evil is defeated. Death is conquered. You and I in Faith in Christ Jesus have no 
further fears or anxieties, for He lives in us and we in Him. 



Patterson Progress 

Patterson School, an institution of the Caldwell County through the years, 

Diocese, in Happy Valley, Ledgerwood, and peoples from all denominations and 

reports some progress towards the goal agencies, regardless of faith, have re- 

of $50,000 needed for property improve- sponded in a fine measure to the im- 

ments. Reported in the March Issue of provement needs at the school. Episco- 

this paper was the sum of over $8,000 palians can indeed be proud that one of 

subscribed in Grace Parish, Morganton. their official institutions has deserved 

The citizens of Caldwell County ,_ in tne recognition of the whole community 



it serves. Superintendent Weise, and 



which the School is located, have raised 

over $13,000 for the fund: this sum to . . . 

go directly into the cost of the new gym- staff ' deserve congratulations and the 
nasium. Patterson School has been a hearty financial support of the peoples 
strong factor in the developing life of in the Diocese. 



The Bishop's Schedule 



April 9, 1950 

Easter Day 8 A. M. Asheville School 

9 A. M. Church of the Redeemer, Craggy 
11 A. M. St. George's, Asheville 
4:30 P. M. Highland Hospital 
April 11-15 Salt Lake City, Utah, for a meeting of the Joint Commission on 

Rural Work of the General Convention. 
April 16 11 A. M. St. John's, High Shoals 

3 P. M. Consecration of St. Mark's Church, Gastonia 
8 P. M. Christ School Arden 

April 19 Executive Council Meeting 

April 22 3 P. M. Presentation service at St. Agnes, Franklin 

8 P. M. St. Barnabas, Murphy 
April 23 9 A. M. Chapel of the Holy Comforter, Andrews 

1 1 A. M. Church of the Messiah, Murphy 

4 P. M. Presentation Service, Trinity, Asheville 
8 P. M. St. Francis, Rutherfordton 

April 24 District Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, St. Mark's, Gastonia 

April 25 District Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, Grace, Morganton 

April 27 District Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, Asheville 

April 28 District Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, Tryon 

April 30 District Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary for the 5th District 

3:30 P. M. Presentation Service, St. John's Marion 

7:30 St. Andrew's' Canton. 
May 1-7 Preaching Mission at Patterson School 

May 7 8:00 P.M. St. James, Hendersonville 

May 9-10 1:30 P. M. Speak at W.C.T.C, Cullowhee 

Meet with Canterbury Club. 
May 10-11 Diocesan Convention, Hickory 



Lenten Offerings 

THE CHURCHMAN was in error Asheville, on the Second Sunday after 
(March Issue) in reporting that the Easter, April 23rd, at 4 P. M. The Con- 
Lenten Church School Offerings would vocation of Morganton will make their 
be presented for the Convocation of presentation at St. John's Church, Mar- 
Asheville at Fletcher and Highlands. The ion, on the Third Sunday after Easter, 
revised plans call for the presentation to April 30th, at 3:30 P. M. The Bishop 
be made in the western area at St. Agnes' of the Diocese will be present at all 
Church, Franklin, on the afternoon of Presentation ceremonies and will give 
April 22nd, Saturday; the presentations the addresses. It is hoped that all church 
for the eastern section of the Convoca- schools will wholeheartedly attend these 
tion will be made at Trinity Church, Presentation Services. 



Laymen's Conference 



By John T. 
Publicity 

Headline News! The Lord has truly 
blessed us beyond our deserts and be- 
yond our fondest hopes. 

The Rev. Arnold M. Lewis, Executive 
Director of the Presiding Bishop's Com- 
mittee on Laymen's Work, with head- 
quarters in New York, has accepted our 
invitation to be the featured speaker for 
the Diocesan Conference of Laymen at 
Patterson School on June 3rd and 4th — 
the first week end in June. 

The Conference begins at noon on 
Saturday, June 3rd, and will be com- 
pleted with dinner, (1 P. M.) Sunday, 
June 4th. A fine program of work and 
play is in the course of preparation. 
There will not be a dull moment in the 
24 hours — -renewing friendships, making 
new ones, swapping knives or preach- 
ers — -a championship soft ball game and 
a swim for the athletically inclined. 

Bishop Henry will be with us on Sat- 
urday and through breakfast on Sunday 
morning. He has re-arranged his sched- 



Roughton 
Director 

ule in order to attend most of our ses- 
sion. 

The presence of Arnold Lewis at our 
Conference is a clear indication that the 
National Church is vitally interested in 
this Diocese. Arnold will be in one of the 
Western Provinces in May but will back 
track to bring to us the inspiration that 
ha* fired laymen of our Church through- 
out the Nation. 

George Wiese can accomodate 75 men 
so that each Key Man may bring one 
or more laymen to the Conference at 
Patterson School. Make your plans now. 

Ralph Todd has arranged with a laun- 
dry in Lenoir to furnish all bed linen. 
We may need blankets, so ask your 
wives if you may bring one old blanket 
strapped to your suitcase or in the back 
of your car. 

The registration and tuition fee will 
be $2.50 per man to cover a nights lodg- 
ing and four meals from Saturday lunch 
to Sunday dinner, both inclusive. 



Laymen At Work 



By A. B. Stoney 

Diocesan officers of the Presiding 
Bishop's Committee on Laymen's Work 
met March 9th in the home of Chairman 
A. B. Stoney in Morganton and laid 
plans for the Laymen's Conference to be 
held June 3rd and 4th at Patterson 
School, Legerwood. In attendance were 
J. Ralph Todd of Lenoir, Edwin S. Hart- 
shorn, Asheville, the two area chair- 
men — Ben H. Sumner, Spindale, secre- 
tary-treasurer; John T. Roughton, Mor- 
ganton, Publicity Director and Mr. 
Stoney. 

In outlining his views of what should 
be accomplished at the June conference, 
Mr. Stoney said that carefully selected 
speakers will lead discussions of lay ac- 



tivities now in successful operation in 
the Diocese. The exchange of ideas plus 
the inspiration and guidance to be had at 
the conference is being counted on to 
spur lay activity, especially the work of 
increasing the number of candidates for 
confirmation. 

Mr. Stoney reported that he had re- 
ceived word that the Rev. Arnold M. 
Lewis, Executive Director of the Nation- 
al Committee for Laymen's Work with 
headquarters in New York, will be pres- 
ent and will be the featured speaker at 
the conference. 

Seventy-five men are expected to par- 
ticipate in the twenty-four hour session 
for which Superintendent George Weise 
(Continued On Page 15) 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Lenthe Rush Campbell 
DISTRICT INSTITUTES 
Our President, Airs Kemper and the 
District Directors have worked out an 
excellent set-up for our Training Insti- 
tutes. The women of the Diocese have 
long felt the need of training institutes 
where we may help and be helped in 
our Auxiliary work. The success of the 
institutes will depend on YOU. 

The following are the dates for the 
District meetings. Mark them on your 
Calendar NOW! 

Districts — Tirst — Thursday, April 27th, 
Hendersonville 
Second — Friday, April 28th, 

Asheville 
Third — -Tuesday, April 25th, 

Morganton 
Fourth — Monday, April 24th, 

Gastonia 
Fifth— Sunday, April 30th. 
Each meeting will start at 10 a. m. with 
the celebration of Holy Communion. 
From eleven to twelve there will be a 
business meeting. There will be noonday 
Prayers. The lunch hour will follow at 
12:15. Promptly at 1:15 The Training 
Institutes will start with an orientation 
session of about twenty minutes for the 
entire group. 

There will be six work shop groups as 
follows: 

1 . Presidents 
Vice Presidents 
Secretaries 
Promotion 

2. Treasurers 

V. T. 0. Custodians 

3. Christian Education 
Devotional 

4. Christian Social Relations 
Church Periodical Club 
Personnel 

5. Missions and Church 
Extension 

Supply 



All Saints Day Memorial Offering 
6. Altar Guild 

Youth and Student Work 
The Work Shop groups will have a 
full hour session for the discussion per- 
iod. Following the hour session, the 
entire group will assemble for a brief 
time before adjournment. Don't worry 
about the hour being late, for you will 
be on your way home by 3:30 p. m. 

These tentative plans should thrill 
every member in our Diocese — and that 
means every woman in every Church. 
So MAKE' YOUR PLANS TO AT- 
TEND ONE OF THE INSTITUTES. 



A Prayer, in its simplest definition, is 
merely a wish turned heavenward. 

— Phillips Brooks. 

Prayer is the voice of faith — Home. 

You Pray in your distress and in your 
need: would that you might Pray also 
in the fulness of our joy and in your days 
of abundance. — Gibran. 

If I am right, Thy Grace impart. 
Still in the right to- stay; 
If I am wrong, O teach my heart 
To find that better way! — Pope. 

Ask, and it shall be given you — seek 
and ye shall find; knock and it shall be 
opened unto you. — Matthew VII 7. 



CHILDREN GIVE TO CHURCH 
$1,510,738 

Gifts totaling $1,510,738.45 have been 
made by children and young people 
of the Episcopal Church during the past 
three years. This sum includes four 
special offerings by Church School chil- 
dren and youth. The largest, $1,510,- 
738.45 is the Church School Lenten Off- 
ering, which is used for missions in all 
parts of the world. The other special 
offerings are the Birthday Thank Off- 
ering, the United Youth Offering, and 
Christmas Boxes. 



NEWS OF THE DIOCESE 



Without Benefit Of Clergy 

St. Mary's Church, Beaver Creek, has 
discovered that Israel can often do more 
than expected without a clergyman. The 
good people of that mission near Jeffer- 
son have, of their own accord and with- 
out benefit of clergy, recently conditioned 
their Church property, spending more 
than $1000. The Church has been un- 
derpinned and enclosed; a new roof and 
flu constructed. One of the constituents 
of the Church, Mr. Earl A. Ray, Sr., has 
supervised the work, and all the people 
have responded well to the project. Such 
signs of vitality in our Churches betrays 
a deeper spiritual growth. 

St. George's — West Asheville 

The new mission recently organized 
and admitted to the Diocese located in 
West Asheville is to be known as St. 
George's Church. Eighty-eight families 
have been contacted in that new work. 
Until a minister-in-charge can be named, 
the work is being carried on by the 
laity. Other new missions recently ad- 
mitted to the Diocese are, Grace Chapel, 
Asheville; Holy Comforter, Andrews; 
and St. Barnabas, Murphy. 

Men of Church Street 

The Men of Church Street, Asheville, 
including the laymen of our Trinity 
Church, Central Methodist Church, and 
First Presbyterian Church, are again 
observing Lent together with Sunday 
evening services at the several Churches, 
and noon-day preaching at the Imperial 
Theatre. Dr. F. Crossley Morgan, rep- 
resenting the Presbyterian Church U. S.. 
is the first week's speaker. The Rev. 
Ralph Meadowcroft, a distinguished 
preacher in our Church, will give the 
Passion Week addresses. The Holy Week 
addresses will be presented by Metho- 



dist Bishop Paul B Kern. This annual 
observance by the Men of Church Street 
was initiated many years ago by Trinity 
Church. 

Rossmaessler Tenders Resignation 

The Bishop reports that he has re- 
ceived notice that Fr. E. 0. Rossmaess- 
ler, resident chaplain at Christ School, 
has tendered his resignation. Fr. Ross- 
maessler will remain at his duties until 
the end of the current curricular term. 
Christ School is an institution of the 
Diocese located at Arden. Fr. Rossmaess- 
ler has been canonically connected with 
this Diocese since November 15, 1948; 
coming here from the Diocese of Mary- 
land. 

Zither of Many Strings 

Lovers of poetry within the Diocese 
will be interested in securing a copy of 
Marie Aldrich Cravner's "Zither Of 
Many Strings" published recently by 
the Stevens Press, Asheville. It is a 
collection of poetical works of Mrs. 
Cravner written over a period of sev- 
eral years. 

Mrs. Cravner, wife of the Rev. W. C. 
Cravner, Rector of St. Mark's Church, 
Gastonia, has brought literary distinc- 
tion to our Diocesan family. Quite a 
few of the poems contained in "Zither 
of Many Strings" were first published 
in past issues of THE LIVING 
CHURCH and other current periodi- 
cals; others are published for the first 
time in this delightful little volume of 
verse. 

Men In Kitchen 

A new "twist" to the custom of a 
monthly corporate Communion of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew has been 
worked out recently by the Grace 



Church, Morganton, Brotherhood. Two 
members are taking turns cooking break- 
fast and having it ready in the Parish 
House immediately following the 8:00 
A. M. Celebration. Furthermore men 
outside the membership of the Brother- 
hood are invited to attend. Breakfast is 
paid for by the Rector's Discretionary 
Fund, but members of the Brotherhood 
are reminded of this fact when they pass 
the alms basin. Some 25 men made their 
Communion. This was an increase of 
better than a hundred per cent over the 
former average attendance. Much great- 
er success as to number attending might 
make it difficult to finish washing the 
dishes before the opening of Church 
School ! 

Concerto Of Life 

The Rev. John W. Tuton, Rector of 
Trinity Parish, Asheville, is the speaker 
of the spoken portions of a new radio 
program emanating from Station WLOS, 
Asheville, on Sundays at 1 P. M., en- 
titled, "Concerto of Life." The program 
highlights a recording selected from the 
repertory of the worlds best music. The 
listener hears Mr. Tuton's voice via wire 
recording at the close of the musical por- 
tion. His conversational addresses con- 
cern the Parables of Our Lord, and are 
recorded in his study at Trinity Church 
earlier in the week. The program is 
unique and no doubt will receive wider 
listening. WLOS, Mr. Tuton, and Sound 
Products Company, the sponsor, have 
set a high standard of radio program- 
ming for our area. 

Stoney For Senate 

Mr. A. B. Stoney, Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton, and Chairman of the Diocesan 
Committee on Laymen's Work, has an- 
nounced his intention to run for the 
State Senate. At this writing, the editor, 
having no knowledge of Mr. Stoney's po- 
litical affiliation, can say that if his 
record as a Churchman is to be taken 
into account, the voters in his district 
will send him to Raleigh. 



Winters Ordained Priest 

On April First, the Rev. Rhett Y. Win- 
ters was ordained to the Sacred Priest- 
hood by the Bishop of the Diocese. The 
scene of the Ordination was the Church 
of the Transfiguration, Bat Cave, where 
Mr. Winters has been serving as Deacon- 
in-Charge. The candidate was presented 
by the Rev. James P. Burke; The Rev. 
Hall Patrick, Albemarle, was the Gosp- 
eler; The Rev. George B. Dayson was 
Epistler; the Rev. Mark Jenkins was 
Litanist. The ordination sermon was 
preached by the Rev. R. Emmet Grib- 
bon, Jr., Clemson, S. C. The Womens 
Auxiliary served lunch in the parish 
rooms after the ordination. 

St. Agnes, Franklin 

St. Agnes Church, Franklin, has re- 
vived work on its Parish House, which 
was begun several years ago. The great- 
er portion of a fund given in memory of 
the late Mrs. J. W. Cantey Johnson was 
used for wiring the Parish House. A con- 
tribution in memory of the late Mr. J. E. 
S. Thorpe will be used to help build the 
chimney. The Woman's Auxiliary of St. 
Agnes Church is having a series of bake 
sales, the proceeds from which will go 
into the finishing of the Parish House — 
plumbing, painting, heating. One of the 
hardware stores has given a second-hand 
electric stove to the project. After the 
building is more nearly completed, the 
men of the congregation will do the 
painting jobs, and the women will work 
on "interior decoration." Upon comple- 
tion of the building, the Sunday School 
classes will be held there. At present, the 
Sunday School meets in the Rectory. 



The St. Agnes Auxiliary has been in- 
strumental in reviving interest in the 
Girl Scout program in Franklin. Due to 
a lack of trained leaders, there has not 
been an organized troop in Franklin for 
several years. Through the efforts of the 
Auxiliary, leadership training courses 
are now being conducted. The Auxiliary 



8 



has agreed to sponsor an Intermediate 
troop as soon as one can be properly 
organized. 



A Nursery Department has been 
added to the St. Agnes Sunday School. 
This is held on the first and third Sun- 
day mornings during Church time, so 
that the young mothers can attend the 
services more regularly. 

All Souls, Biltmore 

During Lent there has been a series 
of suppers and lectures in the Parish 
House of All Souls Church each Thurs- 
day evening, the suppers at 6:30, and 
the lectures at 7:30 p. m. 

The lectures have been on Church 
History. The series is as follows: 

February 23 — "The Early Centuries" 
—The Rev. Gale D. Webbe 

March 2 — "The Mediaeval Church" 
— The Rev. W. C. Cravner 

March 9 — "The Reformation" 

— The Rev. John W. Tuton 

March 16 — "The Great Century" 

— The Rev. Isaac Northup 

March 23 — "The Contemporary 
Church" 
— The Rt. Rev. George Henry, D. D. 

The Rector Writes: 

The series has been most enjoyable 
because of their precision. We sit down 
promptly at 6:30 and the lecture begins 
promptly at 7:30 and ends at 8:20 with 
an opportunity of questions until 8:30. 
All this has been made possible because 
of the very thorough renovation of the 
Parish House about a year and a half 
ago, making it very simple to feed large 
gatherings of people. However, at these 
particular series, our capacity of 140 was 
filled. Tickets for the entire series were 
sold out early in the game, so great was 
the interest, and no single tickets could 
be purchased. A few tickets were sold 
for the lectures only at 7:30. 



This series has met with wonderful 
applause in the Asheville community. 
Unfortunately only a very few tickets 
could be sold to persons outside of All 
Souls Church. The series has been so 
successful that something of the sort will 
certainly be done next Lent. 

The series was undertaken for the 
reason that Lent in All Souls Church in 
time past has offered so little in the way 
of evening opportunities for the men. 
The men have responded to this oppor- 
tunity and have thoroughly enjoyed it. 
The series has also been a delightful 
opportunity to put into action the six 
women's committees recently organized 
for just such occasions by a group of 
thirty-six women of the congregation. 
The Rector turned the problem of pro- 
viding food for these large gatherings 
over to these women, and they solved the 
problem and now undertake all func- 
tions involving the kitchen. 

Choral Evensong 

Something new was started this Lent 
in All Souls Church, a Junior Choir has 
been organized by Clemens Sandresky, 
our organist and choir director, and 
each Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock — 
Passion Sunday afternoon is an excep- 
tion because of the Cantata and Drame — 
this Junior Choir renders Evensong in 
the Church by candlelight. Fortunately 
All Souls Church was recently given 
beautiful candlesticks that conveniently 
fit on each pew. They were made per- 
sonally by the Hon. Junius G. Adams 
in his workshop, woodcraft being a hob- 
by of his. The services of Evensong have 
been well attended, and the training for 
the children is very valuable indeed. 
There is no sermon, the rector renders 
the Office of Evensong, and Junior Choir 
singing a canticle, and in particular they 
have enjoyed both the evening hymns 
and especially the hymns for children in 
the new hymn book. 

Family Portrait 

An unusual service of music and 
drama will be presented in All Souls 



Church, Passion Sunday afternoon, 
March 26, at 4:00 p.m. 

Act III, Scene 2, from "Family Por- 
trait," a Broadway hit with a long run, 
of about ten years ago, will be presented. 
Judith Anderson starred in the play on 
Broadway. Locally it is a Broadway 
actress who will play the part of Mary 
the Mother, Mrs. Joel B. Adams, the 
former Dorothy Beattie, who will play 
the part was in the cast of "Edward My 
Son," the recent broadway hit. She 
played the part of Edward's wife. 

Other members of the cast are equally 
well known here in Asheville. Mrs. 
Laura Schnorrenberg who had a leading 
part in the recent production of "Medea" 
will play Magdalen. Mrs. Mary Ward, 
well known in theatre work will play the 
part of Mary Cleophas. Mr. Manly E. 
Wright, a Vestryman of All Souls Church 
will be Nathan, the inn-keeper. 

The off-stage mob scene which, to- 
gether with the Roman trumpeter adds 
greatly to the dramatic climax of the 
scene, will be played by Latimer Ru- 
dolph, Harry Moreland, Landon Rob- 
erts and Mr. and Mrs. McBride. 

The scene is under the able direction 
of Miss Laura Plonk. 

"Family Portrait" is one of the most 
engaging presentations of the life and 
teaching of Our Lord, thoroughly mod- 
ern and thoroughly reverent. It is par- 
ticularly appropriate that it should be 
presented in a church. For the produc- 



tion a special stage will be put in place, 
extending the chancel of the church 
right out into the nave, in the tradition 
of the staging of the Mediaeval mystery 
plays. In All Souls Church this is done 
in order that those sitting in the tran- 
septs on either side will have a full 
view of the action. 

The scene will be set most appropri- 
ately within the singing of the Cantata 
of the "Crucifixion" by Stainer. The 
portion of Holy Week, which began with 
Palm Sunday, will be sung by the choir 
until the story reaches the scene in the 
Upper Room, at the time of the Last 
Supper. Then the scene will be pre- 
sented; the trial of Jesus will be heard in 
the distance by the shouting of a mob 
off stage. The dramatic action will be 
suddenly interrupted. The players will 
exit and the story will be continued by 
the fortissimo entrance of the choir, tak- 
ing up "The Crucifixion" itself in music. 

The choir will be under the direction 
of Clemens Sandresky, organist and 
choir director. The soloists will be: Mar- 
that Heygel, soprano, Richard Ford, 
baritone, and Sam Owen, tenor. 

Responsible for the smoothness of the 
whole production, since the scene has 
to be laid in the sight of the congrega- 
tion half way through the service, will 
be a group of acolytes specially trained 
by the rector: William Holt, Robert Sut- 
tle, Jim Campbell, Sheldon Campbell, 
Miller Jackson. 



GIVES ALTAR CLOTH EMBROIDERED 
BY KING TO DELAWARE CHURCH 

Wilmington, Del. — • Erik Boheman, 
Swedish ambassador to the Linked 
States, presented a red altar cloth, per- 
sonally embroidered by King Gustav V 
of Sweden, to historic Old Swede's 
Church here. 



In making the presentation, Mr. Bohe- 
man said that both America and Sweden 
are "guardians of the Christian faith, of 
freedom of the individual, and of de- 
mocracy." 

The Rt. Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry, 
Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Dela- 
ware, accepted the altar cloth. 



10 



Other Christian Bodies 



Texas Baptists have embarked on an 
extensive FM radio program. In Dallas 
a #75,000 Baptist broadcasting station 
has been on the air; it is intended to be 
a key station in a state-wide FM net- 
work. The State Convention of Texas 
Baptists found that over 500 local Bap- 
tist churches have made tentative appli- 
cations to the FCC for small power FM 
stations to serve their immediate lo- 
cales . . . 

Methodists across the nation have 
been stirred up concerning an article by 
Stanley High some weeks ago in THE 
READERS DIGEST, written about 
the "pink fringe" of several agencies of 
the Methodist Church. Ministers and 
laity of the local level have reported 
cases of high temperature, in some cas- 
es, the pastoral relationship of the min- 
ister has been very precautious. At this 
writing, the controversy has been calmed 



through open discussion and honest edi- 
torials in THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
ADVOCATE, official Methodist weekly 
Mr. High's article, by all measurements, 
was misleading, to say the least. . . 

The Congregational - Christian and 
Evangelical and Reformed merger has 
been definitely stopped by the decision 
of Judge Meier Steinbrick on the pro- 
posed merger plan of the Congregation- 
alisms General Council. The judge made 
the point that the local Congregational- 
Christian churches were essentially au- 
tonomous, legally, and, that the General 
Council could not act in any way which 
would hinder the funds or property of 
these local congregations. The proposed 
merger of the two communions would 
have been unique in that it would have 
wedded a truly "congregational" policy 
with the traditional liturgical emphasis 
of the "E & R" communion . . . 



DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR TO 
ENTER MINISTRY OF 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Rutland, Vt. — Dr. John M. Thomas, 
former insurance executive, author, and 
president of four colleges, will be or- 
dained a deacon of the Episcopal Church 
on April 23. Dr. Thomas is 80 years old. 

New careers are an old story to Dr. 
Thomas. Before assuming the presidency 
of Middlebury College in 1908, he was 
a minister of the Presbyterian Church, 
stationed at Orange, N. J. Later he held 
the position of president of Pennsylvania 
State College for four years, leaving to 
become president of Rutgers University 



in New Jersey. Between 1930 and 1938 
he was vice president of the National 
Life Insurance Company in Montpelier, 
Yt. In 1938 he was named president of 
Norwich LIniversity. He is the author of 
several books on the Bible. 

Dr. Thomas explained his turn to the 
Episcopal ministry by pointing out that 
there are no Presbyterian churches in 
this part of Vermont. "It seems only 
proper and natural," he said, "that I 
should seek the same position in the 
Episcopal Church. I hope I can be use- 
ful." 

The Rt. Rev. Vedder Van Dyck, 
Bishop of Vermont, will officiate at the 
ordination on the 23rd. 



11 



Christian Ethics 



Taking liberties with the Revelation 
of St. John the Divine, some of us have 
come to the conclusion, in terms of cur- 
rent definitions, that we are neither 
"wet" nor "dry", and, under the cir- 
cumstances cannot be one or the other. 
We would be closing our eyes to reality 
if we did not recognize the gathering 
political storm over the question of 
"prohibition." The issues are so scrab- 
bled that a conscientious Christian citi- 
zen finds it difficult to see the real 
issues, say nothing of coming to any 
conclusion about them. Some things need 
to be seen however, on both sides of the 
controversy. Organized commercial in- 
terests, for their own gain, are support- 
ing one side or the other. One of the 
largest financial supports of the dry 
movement are the large soft-drink man- 
ufacturers. On the other hand, the dis- 
tillers, brewers, and distributors are 
pouring thousands of dollars into their 
advertising and lobbying. Certain bodies 
of Christians are giving the "drys" unan- 
imous support, and subtely coercing 



their members to sign petitions and 
"white cards." At the same time these 
Christian bodies are saying nothing 
about the social or economic structure 
that begats a civilization which creates 
the conditions from which men flee via 
alcohol. On the other hand, liquor and 
beer advertising is essentially falacious, 
as is much consumer goods advertising. 
None of these important facts should 
hide from us the prime fact that alcohol- 
ism is a deadly cancer in our culture, 
and, as such should be controlled as any 
other disease. To this end, we whole- 
heartedly support as individuals any pos- 
itive legislation, such as a good bill 
concerning liquor advertising, or an hon- 
est and comprehensive ABC program. 
In Western North Carolina the public 
issue is quite divided. We can do some- 
thing about the problem by dealing with 
it honestly when it is in our midst; by 
informing ourselves of basic issues; by 
discussing it in our families and church 
groups. 



MAY HAVE BISHOP FOR 
ARMED FORCES 

The Episcopal Church has made pro- 
visions for a Bishop to be in charge of 
the Church's work among the Armed 
Forces. He will be a Suffragan to the 
Presiding Bishop, and no election and 
consecration will take place until in- 
crease in the number of chaplains, or 
some emergency makes it advisable to 
have this supervisory and pastoral over- 
sight of work among men and women in 
uniform. 



MANY STUDENTS TO BECOME 
MISSIONARIES 

In a student body of 150, the Virginia 
Theological Seminary, Alexandria, which 
trains young men for the ministry of the 
Episcopal Church, has 26 students who 



intend to make their life-work that of a 
missionary in some overseas country. 



TOO LITTLE TIME ALLOWED FOR 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

People expect their children to be edu- 
cated in religion in about twenty days, 
declared the Rev. Dr. John Heuss, Di- 
rector of the Department of Christian 
Education of the Episcopal Church in 
a recent statement. The normal Church 
School year, he pointed out is forty 
weeks. Perfect attendance of a pupil 
would be forty times a year for twelve 
years. This amounts to twenty days of 
full instruction and impression in the 
life of the Church. "Think of this! Such 
a sliver of time is used in Christian edu- 
cation in the life of a child," Dr. Heuss 
concluded. 



12 



Beyond Our Borders 



Bishop Frederick L. Barry of Albany 
received from a total stranger living in 
another state, a check for #1,000, with a 
letter saying that he had heard of the 
1950 increased budget for the general 
Church, "the great Venture of Faith, 
and I salute you. Accept the enclosed 
check for your own bread and butter in 
the diocese." The Bishop tells also of a 
check from a member of the Woman's 
Auxiliary for $500, and a doubled pledge 
from the W. A. itself. Two of the clergy 
have announced that they are tithing. 
Bishop Barry comments, "Such results 
are inevitable when we let ourselves go 
spiritually." 

Chaplain James Edden, stationed at 
Camp Leroy Johnson, New Orleans, 
reported a baptism which was unique 
in several respects. The mother was a 
member of the Episcopal Church, a Jap- 
anese from Honolulu; the father was 
a white Louisianian, the officient a Ne- 
gro priest, the proxy godparents all 



Southern-born. Said Chaplain Edden, 
himself a Negro priest, "All through the 
service I had a feeling that this is the 
way God would like for us to live." 

Good progress is being made in se- 
curing assurances for displaced persons, 
the Rev. Dr. Almon R. Pepper told the 
National Council at its recent meeting. 
At that time, Dr Pepper said there were 
759 assurances and in many places 
Church people had started earlier and 
made assurances through other agencies. 
He is confident that in the very near fu- 
ture the Episcopal Church goal of 1,200 
displaced persons and their families will 
be reached. 

The Archbishop of York told the con- 
gregation of the Cathedral at Liverpool 
recently that, "When the hydrogen bomb 
is made there will be in men's hands 
weapons far more destructive than those 
which blasted into ruins two Japanese 
cities. Now that the race to make these 



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THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New Yoik 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 
Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
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PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
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13 



super bombs has been started it will only 
end either by their use in war or by in- 
ternational agreement to prohibit or 
control their manufacture. This is the 
only alternative — destruction or agree- 
ment. It is the duty of all who value our 
civilization to urge, while there is time, 
the outlawry and control of this devilish 
weapon." 



Bishop John B. Bentley, vice-presi- 
dent of the National Council and di- 
rector of the Overseas Department, is on 
his way to Brazil to visit the Church's 
work there, and to take part in the con- 



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secration of Bishop-elect Egmont Mach- 
ado Krischke. 

Russell E. Dill, treasurer of the Na- 
tional Council, is visiting Puerto Rico, 
the Virgin Islands and Haiti, for confer- 
ence with the bishops and missionaries. 



At Sagada, the Philippines, the Rev. 
James Kollins and the Rev. Robert 
Pekas were ordained to the priesthood 
in the Church of St. Mary the Virgin. 
This was the first ordination to the 
priesthood ever held in the Philippines 
where the only American to take part 
was the Suffragan Bishop. Acolytes, 
four priests taking part and the two or- 
dinals were all Filipinos. 

Melish Appeal 

Through Joseph F. Fletcher, of our 
seminary at Cambridge, Mass., an ap- 
peal has been filed before the appellate 
division of the New York Supreme Court 
concerning the decision against the Rev. 
John Howard Melish, ousted Rector of 
Holy Trinity Church, Brooklyn. Eight 
Bishops, and 1,123 of the Clergy of our 
Church have indicated their support of 
this appeal. The brief filed stated, be- 
cause "we are concerned with (1) the 
freedom of the priestly and prophetic 
function of the ministry and (2) the se- 
curity of tenure of the minister against 
dissolution of his pastoral relationship 
contrary to the expressed wishes of a 
majority of his congregation." 



VESTMENTS 
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14 



LAYMEN AT WORK 

(Continued From Page 5) 
has offered the full facilities of the 
school. Further details on the meeting 
are to be announced later. 

Encouraging reports have come to the 
Laymens Committee during the past 
month from the following — Trinity, 
Asheville; All Souls, Biltmore; St. Mat- 
thias, Asheville; Transfiguration, Bat 
Cave; Ascension, Hickory; Redeemer, 
Shelby; St. Marks, Gastonia; Haw 
Creek, Asheville; Grace, Morganton; 
Holy Trinity, Spruce Pine. We must have 
at least a line or two from other church- 
es. Please do this. 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

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Compliments 
ol 

Asheville 

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Do you think that your church is too 
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last summer with one adult male com- 
municant — "We got started only a year 
ago as an organized mission. We've had 
one man confirmed since. That makes 
only 2 of us (men). Only three families 
and two elderly ladies can be figured 
as regularly interested communicants. 



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Dates To Remember 

APRIL 22, 23, 30— Lenten Offering 
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APRIL 24 to 30— Auxiliary District In- 
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MAY 10 & 11— Annual Diocesan Con- 
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JUNE 3 & 4 — Diocesan Mens Conven- 
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JULY 2 to 8 — Diocesan Youth Camp. 




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1= 





VOL. XX 



MAY 1950 



No. 9 



The Bishop's ly To Young Churchmen 

The young churchmen of our diocese will soon be out of school. For 
some. Commencement will mark the end of school "at home." For others 
it will be the cessation of daily study until next Fall. For all it will be a 
change. 

The question that should be faced is "What will I do with my sum- 
mer?" I would like to suggest certain concrete parts of your summer pro- 
gram. 

A. RECREATION: There are times when all of us should allow rest 
to rebuild our physical, spiritual, and emotional lives. Don't rush about 
seeking pleasure and end the summer so tired that you are exhausted. 

B. WORSHIP: Your "bounden duty is the worship of God every Sun- 
day in His Church." Wherever you may be during the summer make this 
a part of your life. You can thereby enter into a sense of the larger fellow- 
ship of the Church. In your outdoor life, realize the beauty, grandeur, and 
miracle of all parts of Creation. 

C. SERVICE: With school duties removed, ask for and undertake 
some responsibility (not ordinarily carried on during the Winter) in the 
life of the Church. 

D. STUDY: You don't stop eating in the Summer. In the same way, do 
not stop feeding your minds. Find out about those things which you do not 
have the opportunity to study during the regular school term. 

E. FELLOWSHIP: Make new friends. Increase the Christian love that 
you have for others. Realize that true friendships grow only as the spirit of 
God (of love) deepens. 

Summer camps and conferences are helps in all of these parts of your 
program. Attend the Diocesan Camp and/or Kanuga if at all possible. If 
it is impossible for you to attend these events, carry out on your own accord 
a well rounded life of recreation, worship, service, study, and fellowship. 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of W estern North Carolina 



Styr i£tgt?lanii 
(dljurrljinan 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



Diocesan Indebtedness 

Lest we forget, Mr. Wm. Redwood, 
Diocesan Treasurer reminds us that in- 
debtedness on the Bishop's House is 
$5,000. Payments come due regularly, 
it seems. The Treasurer reports that 
some parishes and missions have not as- 
sumed a share of this responsibility. The 
next payment is due in September; per- 
haps if some of us would remember that 
deadline, the Diocesan Treasurer might 
meet the payment without jeopardizing 
regular diocesan finance? The Executive 
Council is not anxious to continually re- 
mind us of this matter, but there is a 
great urgency in the months ahead to 
gracefully reduce this principal. 



THE DIOCESAN OFFICE, 46 MACON 
AVENUE, ASHEVILLE, WILL BE 
CLOSED FROM MAY 15TH TO MAY 
29TH. . . 



WHAT IS PATTERSON CAMP? 

THE REV. MARK JENKINS 



An easy question to answer is the "what" of Patterson Camp; an answer that 
is packed with play, study, and worship and all around good fellowship. It is a 
week-long "get-together" of 65 or 70 young people from our Diocese with a faculty 
of the Bishop, clergy, and lay counselors. Comes July 2nd, the camp will gather at 
Patterson School in lovely Happy Valley. Classes comprise the morning's schedule 
each day (with time-off in between classes); from 9:15 until Noon. The courses 
have been selected with care and with special reference to what the young people 
themselves feel they need. These following courses will be taught: "How to know 
the will of God for me"; "Workshop on local program"; "Parables: their lessons for 
today"; "Missions"; "How to read the Bible"; "Christian Symbolism". The Rev. 
G. Mark Jenkins is the Director; the Rev. C. G. Leavell is the co-director. The fac- 
ulty will include the Rev. Rhett Y. Winters, Miss Aline Cronshey, Mr. George 
Weise. The whole camp will be graced by the presence and leadership of the Bishop 
of the Diocese. The Rev. Robert J. McCloskey will be the Chaplain. 

Afternoons will be devoted to swimming, athletics, hobbies. The evenings will 
find us in the Chapel for worship and instruction; before bedtimes the traditional 
evening programs around the campfire. 



WHY ATTEND DIOCESAN CAMP? 



By The Rev. C. G. Leavell 

Every young Churchman of the Dio- 
cese should ask himself (or herself) 
this question: "Why should I attend our 
Diocesan Camp this year?" Your answer 
will be a determining factor in the suc- 
cess or failure of the Camp. 

Your first answer might be: "I should 
attend Camp because I am ignorant." 
Most likely you are ignorant of what 
the Church and the Christian religion 
really are; you are not greatly different 
from your parents in this respect. Real 
knowledge of the meaning of the Creeds, 
of the Bible, of the history of the Church, 
of the missionary work of the Church, 
of the life of our Lord, of the application 
of Christian faith to daily living, of the 
life of prayer, of the Sacraments is a 
somewhat rare thing even in the pews 
of our congregations on a Sunday morn- 
ing. The Diocesan Camp will teach you 
each morning some of these things you 
ought to know; you will at least expose 
yourself to the teachings of the Church. 
Come Christian educators say a week at 
a summer conference is worth a whole 
year in an average Sunday school. We 
fear this may be true. 

Another good answer might be: "I 
need the inspiration to live closer to 
Jesus Christ." Mere knowledge is in it- 
self a dull sort of thing unless with it is 
the uplift of a vision of God, the stirrings 
of the heart. In the setting of Happy 
Valley, at the Chaplain's services, around 
a campfire with fellow Christians, 
through informal contacts with our cler- 
gy and consecrated lay workers, and 
through friendships formed with other 
young people who know and love God, 
real inspiration can and does come. 

A very good answer might be that you 
should attend Camp in order to repre- 
sent your own parish or mission there, 
either to swell the number of those at- 



tending from your congregation or to be 
its sole representative. One of the domi- 
nant reasons for having the Diocesan 
Camp is to create a Diocesan conscious- 
ness and fellowship among the young 
people of Western North Carolina. In no 
small measure this has been accomp- 
lished every summer at Patterson School 
since 1943. Those who have attended 
have gone back home and been leaders 
of other young people in their local 
churches. But young people are getting 
older right along; they go off to college, 
they get married, they take their places 
as adult Christian leaders, and they lose 
contact with the fine crop of our Dio- 
cesan youth of today. We need new, 
young blood at our Diocesan Camp each 
year who will go home speaking the lan- 
guage of other young people and con- 
verting them to informed and inspired 
activity in the life of the Church. 

Now perhaps the poorest reason, but 
still a good one at that if it's in balance 
with "he other reasons, is that Diocesan 
Camp is fun. You should attend if you 
wish to be in on a "whale of a good time," 
have more fun than a barrel of monkeys, 
or a keg of liquor! There is swimming, 
softball, hiking, dancing, singing, bas- 
ketball, campfire stories ( the stories even 
if the campfires are rained out!), and all 
that goes with getting together a group 
ol wide-awake, healthy, sane (and some- 
times a bit insane) youth of the twen- 
tieth century. Many will testify that 
they never had a better time in their lives 
than they have had at some of our even- 
ing recreational programs. They are 
filled with humor, and really all the 
more fun because they are wholesome, 
guided by Christian principles, and eye- 
openers to many of really how much fun 
it is to have a whopping good time with 
other Christians and not be bothered 
with the after-effects of a hang-over of 
conscience pangs. 



3 



If none of the foregoing reasons for 
attending Diocesan Camp appeal to you, 
don't come, unless perhaps it is to give 
to others the sense of God you yourself 
have already attained and ought to 
share with other young people. Don't 
come just because your parents want to 
get rid of you that week. Don't come 
just to have a good time; if that's your 
only reason you won't have it, and you'll 
spoil the fun of others who might have 
it but for your presence there. Don't 
come just to have a cheap vacation; there 



is too much hard work involved, both 
mental and physical. Dishes have to be 
washed, tables waited on, your room 
and the grounds kept clean, programs 
shared in by you. Don't come just be- 
cause you don't wish to disappoint your 
rector who has approached you on the 
matter; you'll disappoint him even more 
if that's your best reason. 

"Why attend Diocesan Camp?" We 
might sum it all up and answer simply 
to become a better Christian' "to know 
the Christ, and to make Him known." 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL— IULY 2-8, 1950 



Na 



me_. 



Age. 



Address 

Parish or Mission- 



Signature of Parent or Guardian 
I recommend the above named applicant to the Diocesan Camp. 

(Rector or Priest in Charge) 

Cut out this application and mail to the Rev. Mark Jenkins, Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, N. C, together with $1.00 registration fee. 



YOUNG PEOPLE GIVE $20,245.70 
TO BOYS' HOME 

New York — ■ Young people of the 
Episcopal Church celebrate Youth Sun- 
day each year. In addition to special 
worship services, the young people make 
an offering for some special object, us- 
ually some missionary work either in 
this country or overseas. The Division 
of Youth of the Church announced to- 
day that the total offering to date is 
$20,245.70, and that it is designated for 
St. Francis Boys' Homes in Kansas. 
The Homes care for helpless or depend- 
ent boys, including some who have been 
sent there by juvenile courts or police 
officials. 



LOCAL YOUTH WINS 
NATIONAL CONTEST 

David Owings, Sixth Grader at Ap- 
palachian School, Penland, was the re- 
cipient of a Silver Medal and $25 for 
his prize winning essay in THE LIV- 
ING CHURCH'S recent Church School 
Essay Contest. Besides bringing honor 
to David, the prize reflects favorably 
upon an official institution of this dio- 
cese. Congratulations go to David 
Owings, Appalachian School, and Fr. 
Peter Lambert. David's delightful essay 
should be read by all churchmen; it will 
be found in THE LIVING CHURCH, 
April 23rd Issue. 



YOUTH NEWS 



By Mary Aston Leavell 

Every Friday afternoon during Lent 
the young people of The Ascension, 
Hickory met in the Parish House for a 
service of worship and study. The study 
course, which was conducted by Rev. 
and Mrs. Campbell, was about Japan. 
At the last service Miss Chieko Kishi, a 
student at Lenoir Rhyne, who came over 
from Japan in September, spoke to the 
group. She demonstrated the Japanese 
style of dress, and showed many inter- 
esting objects she had brought from 
Tokyo. Bookmarks made of rice-paper 
and sea weed, from Japan were given to 
all those who attended the services. 
Following Miss Kishi's talk, there was 
a Japanest tea. Japanese lanterns and 
umbrellas were given out at the tea. 

Another project of this group was to 
fill three mite boxes. At each Sunday 
evening service, a mite box was passed 
around. This offering was over and 
above what the members put into their 
individual boxes. The total was eighteen 
dollars. 

Every Sunday evening the Youth Fel- 
lowship of Hickory is served a hot sup- 
per in the Parish House. The members 
of the Bishop Rowe and Bishop Horner 
Circles of the Woman's Auxiliary pre- 
pare and serve the meals. The meals 
make the meetings more enjoyable and 
the young people really appreciate the 
interest shown in their work. Once a 
month the Episcopal students at Lenoir 
Rhyne College are invited to have sup- 
per with the Youth Fellowship. 

The young people of Trinity Church, 
Asheville meet every Sunday afternoon, 
and have supper in the Parish House. 
During Lent they have been doing much 



to help out in the various church services. 
Some of the members sing in the Junior 
Choir, the boys assist Mr. Tuton at the 
altar, and on the Saturday before Palm 
Sunday they got together and made the 
palm crosses. 

The young people of Bat Cave, Hen- 
dersonville and Edneyville had Lenten 
study courses and met at one of the 
three churches each Sunday. They were 
given instruction on various subjects, 
and then quizzed on it. The three per- 
sons from each of the churches making 
the highest score received a free schol- 
arship to Patterson Camp. 

The Junior Altar Guild of Grace 
Church, Morganton has been holding 
study classes during Lent to learn more 
about the altar and its care. These very 
interesting courses have been given by 
the chairman of the Senior Altar Guild, 
Miss Ethel Gordon. The Junior Altar 
Guild has also been taking care of the 
brass. You won't find any shinier brass 
anywhere in the Diocese! 

Topics for recent programs have been 
Overcoming Inferiority Complexes, 
What Lent Means To Me, Choosing My 
Book Friends, and Missions. Attendance 
at our last corporate Communion (one 
is held each month at the early service) 
was increased by the promise of a break- 
fast afterwards. Two of the members 
prepared the delicious meal. 

The Young People of St. Mary's, 
Asheville, presented the Rector with a 
crisp $100 bill recently to buy a water 
heater for the Church kitchen. That 
fired a chain reaction; the Church de- 
cided to enlarge the kitchen to twice its 
former size. 



28th Annual Diocesan Convention 



Church of the Ascension, Hickory 

MAY 10TH 

Morning: 

Opening Service 
Organization of the Convention 
The Bishop's Annual Address 
Afternoon : 

Regular agenda following Rules of 

Order; Constitution and Canons, 

P. 31 
Reports from Richard G. Stone, St. 

Marys School and Jr. College; 

Francis Craighill Brown, Dean, 

School of Theology, Sewanee 



Evening: 

Evening Service in charge of the 
Bishop, assisted by Rev. Geo. Day- 
son and the Rev. Robert Campbell; 
Address: Harold L. Trigg, President, 
St. Augustines College 

MAY 11TH 

Morning: 

7:30 Holy Communion 

Bishop Henry, Celebrant; assisted 
by the Revs. Messers Harris, Win- 
ters, Cambeil 

10:30 Completion of the Business of 
the Convention 



MARCH 12th OFFERING 

RECEIVED BY WM, M. REDWOOD, TREASURER 



PAW 

Asheville, Trinity $ 1563. SO 

Asheville, St. Mary's 212.65 

Asheville, St. Matthias' 25.00 

Biltmore, All Souls' 883.02 

Brevard, St. Philip's 150.00 

Flat Rock, St. John's 

Fletcher, Calvary 312.50 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 346.55 

Hendersonville, St. James' 164.01 

Hickory; Ascension 103.11 

Lenoir, St. James' 67.65 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 115.00 

Marion, St. John's 147.25 

Morganton, Grace 522.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis' 347.02 

Tryon, Holy Cross 871,25 

Waynesville, Grace 140.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 39.65 

Andrews, Floly Comforter 14.00 

Arden, Christ School 

Asheville, The Redeemer 

Asheville, St. Luke's 28.00 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel 25.00 

Bat Cave. Transfiguration 14.25 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 30.00 

Black Mountain, St. James 39.90 

Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. 

Boone, St. Luke's 36.00 

Canton, St. Andrew's 40.10 

Cullowhee, St. David's 

Edneyville, St. Paul's 25.00 

Franklin, St. Agnes 45.00 



Franklin, St. Cyprian's 13.00 

Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 10.55 

Glendale Springs, Holy Trin. 

High Shoals, St. John's 

Highlands, Incarnation 67.3 5 

Hot Springs, St. John's 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 50.00 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 

Lincoln, Woodside, Our Saviour 18.00 

Little Switzerland, Resurrection 

Morganton, St. Mary's 25.00 

Murphy, Messiah 34.00 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 8.00 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 5.00 

Saluda, Transfiguration 45.00 

Shelby, The Redeemer 70.00 

Spruce Pine, Trinity 14.00 

Todd. St. Matthew's 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 110.80 

Asheville, Grace 

Blackstone, Mission 

Cashiers, Good Shepherd 

Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 

Dutch Creek, St. Anthony 

Edneyville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Lincolnton. St. Stephen's 

Linville. All Saints 

Morganton, St. Elizabeth's 

Penland, Good Shepherd 34.69 

Rutherfordton, Missions 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 3.00 

Upward, St. John Baptist 3.80 

West Asheville, St. George's 48".71 



Goal — $4,500.00. 



Total Receipts — $6,898.41. 



THE BISHOP'S SCHEDULE 



May 10-11: Diocesan Convention 

May 14: Asheville School; All Souls, Biltmore; Sand Hill High School 

May 15 to 29: Vacation 

May 30: St. Augustines College, Raleigh 

May 31: Woman's Auxiliary; Calvary, Tarboro 

June 2: Wedding: Charlotte 

June 3 : Laymens Conference 

June 4: Church of the Redeemer, Shelby; St. Andrews, Bessemer City 

June 6: Valle Crucis School Board 

June 8-9: Woman's Auxiliary Convention 

June 11: St. Agnes, Franklin and the Southwest 

June 1 1 to 23 : Kanuga Conferences 



Winds And Fire And Tongues 



When the day of Pentecost was 
fully come, there came a sound of 
rushing wind . . . cloven tongues of 
fire . . . and all began to speak 
with other tongues . . . 

Before the next issue of the CHURCH- 
MAN reaches you, Whitsuntide will 
have been marked. Lest some of you 
have not read the Acts of the Apostles, 
Chapter 2, since last year, we would pre- 
vent your sudden shock on May 28th 
by warning you of the strangely con- 
temporaneous sound of those ancient 
words. Modern apostles of the newest 
science tell us that the First Century 
signs could be noted in an explosion of 
a hydrogen bomb in this Century. On 
every side we are told of the magnitude 
and power of an H-Bomb holocaust. The 
Pentecostal explosion was mighty, too. 
Points of similarity end here, or do they? 



We have attempted to stave-off a 20th 
century explosion by speaking in many 
tongues; hoping we can talk ourselves 
out of experiencing the rushing wind and 
cloven tongues of fire. Perhaps we have 
done the same to the Pentecostal possi- 
bility, too? Both can be prevented. In a 
real sense both must be prevented. Web- 
ster tells us that the word "prevent" has 
an archaic meaning: to anticipate an 
event by preparing for it. As far as 
Whitsunday is concerned, the archaic 
meaning of "prevent" must be used. We 
need a Pentecostal explosion; God will 
act through the Church if we anticipate 
and prepare our hearts for the indwell- 
ing of his Spirit. Even so do we need to 
make use of the common and accepted 
meaning of "prevent" as far as it con- 
cerns an atomic and hydrogen war. It 
could be averted if we would learn to 
speak in intelligent language of the won- 
derful works of God. 



A VISIT TO "281" 



A year ago, a gentleman of our per- 
sonal acquaintance, living at that time 
in the metropolitan New York area, 
visited the office of the Rev. Arnold 
Lewis, Executive Secretary of the Pre- 
siding Bishop's Committee on Laymans 
Work, 281 Fourth Avenue, NYC. Our 
friend asked Arnold Lewis this candid 
question: "Where on the map of the 
Episcopal Church is the work of the 
Kingdom really going strong?" Without 
a moments hesitancy, Mr. Lewis went 
to the huge map of the Church covering 
his office wall and outlined with his 
finger an area known as THE DIO- 
CESE OF WESTERN NORTH CAR- 
OLINA; he said, "Things are happen- 
ing down there!'' A knock at his office 
door announced Dr. George Wieland, 
Director of the Home Department of 
the National Council; Mr. Lewis put the 
question to Dr. Wieland, and he in turn, 
believe it or not, said, "THE DIOCESE 
OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLI- 
NA." (With due regard to our friends 
in other districts and dioceses, both of 
these gentlemen mentioned other "live 
spots.") 

Beyond the incidental pleasure of 
knowing that our Diocese has a good 
name at "281" there are some profound 
reflections that come to us as we think 
of the above incident. 

In a day where over-all administrative 
agencies are infringing upon the auton- 
omy of local areas, we have the know- 
ledge that our National Council is not 
wrapped up in the devices and desires of 
its own selfish heart. As an agency of 



the Church, it is not an agency with 
privileges apart from the working level 
of the Church on Diocesan planes. It 
recognizes its limitations and its purpose. 
Some national agencies of other Chris- 
tian bodies have developed top-heavy, 
beaureacratic, self-sufficient administra- 
tional systems that have lost all contact 
with the Church at work. In our dem- 
ocratic political system, there is some 
question from the most objective observ- 
ers concerning the heirarchical powers 
developed by our national and state 
governmental bureaus and commissions. 
We ought to recognize that our National 
Council has not erred in this respect, 
and cannot, and will not. 

Such acknowledgements thrust defi- 
nite obligations upon us. We must con- 
tinue in the direction we are going. The 
fact that "things are happening down 
here" is only an indication that greater 
things can happen. Furthermore the 
good balance which exists between "281" 
and the diocese will continue only as the 
"field work" of the Church continues; 
this is our duty. In its workings, our 
polity is both catholic and congregation- 
al. Such a balance of freedom and au- 
thority has significance beyond the 
realm of Church administration. The 
problem of "East and West" in inter- 
national politics, and the problem of 
federal power versus state power in our 
national politics, could be enlightened 
by such a balance. In other words, we 
have a mission to fulfill; to make our 
fellowship so real that some of it will 
spill-over into the realm of our daily 
social relationships with others. 



"CHAPTERS IN CHURCH HISTORY SOON AVAILABLE" 

The second volume of the new CHURCH'S TEACHING SERIES, published 
by the Department of Christian Education of the National Council, will soon be 
off the presses. It is entitled, "CHAPTERS IN CHURCH HISTORY" and will 
be available from the National Council at #1.50 per copy. If the sale of the first 
volume in this series was an indication, churchmen will want to order their copies 
immediately to insure delivery. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Lenthe Rush Campbell 

Worship - Study - Service - Fellowship 
Board Meeting 

The Board of The Woman's Auxil- 
iary met in Asheville at the Diocesan 
House on March 23rd, with 21 present — 
A few highlights are as follows: 

Bishop Henry gave an encouraging 
picture of the Diocese. There are four 
new Missions in the Diocese. The drive 
for funds for Patterson School is going 
forward, but needs the help of all of us. 

The fall District Meetings will be held 
Nov. 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 8th and 9th. 

The Retreat for women will be from 
June 5th to 8th at Kanuga. 

The dates for the Adult Training Con- 
ference are from July 8th to July 21st at 
Kanuga. A telegram was read from Mrs. 
William Capers, who, with Mr. Capers is 
in Texas. We all miss the Capers and 
pray for their early return to Tryon. 

Mrs. Henry was hostess at a delight- 
ful lunch. 

District Offerings 

The offerings taken at the District 

Meetings will go toward the erection of a 

Parish House at Edneyville. There is a 

real need for a Parish House there. 

Happenings Throughout The Diocese 

FLETCHER: The Woman's Auxili- 
ary at Fletcher is a busy one. The group 
consists of 50 members and it meets 
monthly. They have a novel idea which 
you might like to try. They serve Smor- 
gasboard Luncheons and dinners. At one 
luncheon they made $204. The Woman's 
Auxiliary made eighteen new cassocks 
for the choir and four new cottas. 

MORGANTON: The Lenten Study 
group at Morganton studied "Japan Be- 
gin Again" by W. C. Kerr. We hear the 
attendance was excellent. They have al- 
ready started work on their bazaar at 
Morganton. They have an all day ses- 
sion once a month. 



LENOIR: A combined group of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of Legerwood, Chap- 
el of Rest, and St. James, Lenoir, held a 
one session Lenten Study Class in St. 
James Parish House on March 20th. 

The meeting convened at five o'clock 
and two speakers gave talks on Present 
Day Life in Japan, its Limitations and 
Needs; also the history of the Episcopal 
Church in Japan. Supper was served at 
6:30 o'clock, and after a short social 
period, a talk was given on the subpect, 
"Japan Begins Again." 

The recreational room was decorated 
with Japanese lanterns, posters, pictures 
and maps, and there was an excellent 
attendance in spite of the inclement 
weather and considerable sickness. 

HICKORY: The Rector conducted a 
study class each Friday evening during 
Lent, for the Woman's Auxiliary and any 
members of the Parish who wished to 
attend. It was an information class about 
the Episcopal Church, and was well at- 
tended. 

New Projects assumed by the differ- 
ent circles of the Woman's Auxiliary are 
as follows: The Bishop Horner and 
Bishop Rowe Circles serve a supper 
every Sunday night to the Young Peo- 
ple's Fellowship. The St. Catherine, St. 
Hilda, and St. Mary's Circles conduct 
the Nursery School during the eleven 
o'clock Sunday Service. Circle Members 
take their turn at the different services. 
The women also serve a supper once a 
month for the Men's Club. 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney and Mrs. Donnell 
VanNoppen spoke at the General Meet- 
ing of the Auxiliary on March 27th. 
Their talks were outstanding and the 
group was greatly inspired by all they 
said. 

World Day of Prayer 

What is your Auxiliary doing? We 
want to hear from you. Don't forget the 
address: P. 0. Box 577, Hickory, N. C. 



Within Our Borders 



MEN WANTED to seriously consider 
the Diocesan Men's Convention at Pat- 
terson School on June 3rd and 4th. Mr. 
Stoney and the Laymens Committee of 
the Diocese have arranged a top-notch 
program. (See CHURCHMAN for 
April; P-5) The Rev. Arnold Lewis (this 
issue; P-8) of the Presiding Bishop's 
Committee on Laymens Work will be 
guest speaker. See your Rector or Key- 
Laymen for details. Act now! 

THE MARCH 12TH OFFERING 

tally is on page six of this issue. 
The tally is as of April 24th. The 
"quota" or "goal" for this offering was 
$4500. Perhaps very late reports will 
bring the grand total to over $7000. 

Recent Confirmations 

The Bishop of the Diocese recently 
confirmed twenty-five persons at Trin- 
ity Parish, Asheville; this fine, large class 
was presented to the Bishop during Holy 
Week. The Warden of St. George's 
Church, West Asheville, presented eight 
persons for confirmation. St. James, Le- 
noir, presented seven confirmees to the 
Bishop. Mr. Arthur Brimley, Grace Mis- 
sion, Asheville, presented a class of five. 
In the absence of a resident minister, the 
Lay Reader at the Church of the Holy 
Cross, Valle Cruris, presented four can- 
didates. It should be noted that of these 
confirmations, seventeen were presented 
by lay people. 

HOLY CROSS, TRYON, announces 
that the Rev. L. A. Harkness is acting 
as locum tenens during April. The Rev. 
William Way, D. D., S. T. D., will act 
in the same capacity during May and 
June. The Rev. Newton Middleton, 
D. D., locum tenens since the beginning 
of the year, left after the Easter festival. 
The parish COLT<IER expressed appre- 
ciation for his services, saying, "he made 
himself not only a vital part of the parish, 
but also the community." 



The Woman's Auxiliary at TRYON 
have awarded a scholarship to Sally 
Goodyear for Patterson Camp in recog- 
nition of her help in the Church School 
and the Girl's Friendly Society. 

ST. MARY'S CHURCH, ASHE- 
VILLE, deserves credit for restoring 
something lost for a long while in relig- 
ious drama (and all true drama). Two 
medieval Mystery Plays were presented 
in the Church on April 14, 15, and 16: 
"The Resurrection of Christ" and "The 
Journey to Emmaus." The plays were 
authentic manuscripts from the late, 
Middle Ages and were produced and 
staged with great detail to the historical 
setting of this type, the earliest type of 
English drama. Mrs. Peter Callahan was 
the director. The musical score was pre- 
pared by Mr. James Dendy. The whole 
production was effected with the cooper- 
ation of the University of North Caro- 
lina. Prior to presentation, the Rev. 
Gale Webb, Rector, wrote, "We dare to 
hope that we may be starting something 
that can become traditional here." 

ST. JAMES CHURCH, HENDER- 
SONVILLE, reports that the special 
Eastertide offering to reduce completely 
the debt on the new Sunday School room 
was successful. The Church Treasurer, 
Mrs. R. P. Freeze, announced that there 
was enough money left over to apply on 
equipment for the room. 

TRINITY CHURCH, ASHEVILLE, 

Woman's Auxiliary have recently pre- 
sented two gifts to the parish: several 
new tables and chairs for the Parish 
Hall, and, the reupholstering of several 
sofas. Trinity announced recently that 
Mrs. Miriam Brown has retired from her 
position as Parish Hostess. 

ST. MARK'S GASTONIA, proudly 
announce the Consecration of their new 
Church building by the Bishop of the 
Diocese on Sunday, April 16th. The 



10 



CHURCHMAN carried an exterior 
etching of the new building in a recent 
issue. The Programme for the Consecra- 
tion Ceremony reads: "The hand of Di- 
vine Providence might almost be seen 
in the happy solution to many years of 
desire on the part of the congregation 
to have a new Church. On the day of 
Consecration the entire properties and 
all furnishings and equipment are fully 
paid for. In this new location the church 
has ample opportunity to minister to 
many people who pass its doors by day 
and worship there each week." 

The establishment and growth of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in Gas- 
tonia covers a period of a little over 
fifty years. About 1903 a lot was pur- 
chased on West Long Avenue in Gas- 
tonia and a church building erected 
there. It was consecrated November 20, 
1903. In 1904 St. Marks was admitted 
as an organized mission of the Mission- 
ary District of Asheville, and in 1915 
was admitted as a full fledged Parish 
of the District. 

Some years ago the church building 
on Long Avenue, as well as the Parish 
House and Rectory properties, were con- 
sidered obsolete. About 1943 several 
of the members of the Parish made con- 
tributions toward a fund for the estab- 
lishment of a new church and Parish 
House and in 1945 a building fund com- 
mittee was formally established and 
sufficient pledges secured from mem- 
bers and friends of the Parish to assure 
a new home. Mr. William Heyl Thomp- 
son of Philadelphia, a noted church 
architect, was engaged to prepare plans 
for a new home. During the war, price 
of building had advanced to a point 
where funds did not permit the carry- 
ing out of the original project. How- 
ever, in June 1948 action was precip- 
itated when the Associate Reformed 
Presbyterian Church placed their prop- 
erties at the corner of York and Frank- 
lin on the market with the idea of re- 
building at another location. It was here 
that the church was presented with a 



real opportunity to buy a building well 
fitted to their needs and the properties 
were purchased. L T nder the guidance of 
Mr. Thompson extensive renovations 
and additions were made to both the 
church and Parish House. To conform 
with the Anglican Liturgy the existing 
Chancel was re-arranged and deepened 
to provide a Chancel with Sanctuary 
and Antiphonal Choir. On the Gospel 
side space was provided for a Sacristy. 
On the Epistle side a passage was created 
leading to the Parish House which is also 
used as a vesting room for the men of 
the choir. The organ chamber was 
above and in it was placed a new organ 
equipped with chimes made by the Aeo- 
lian Skinner Organ Company, the gift 
of one of the members in memory of 
her late husband. New pews and new 
Chancel furnishings made the whole a 
very harmonious picture with pale green 
walls and white painted wood work, to 
conform with the Colonial architecture. 
The Nave has approximately 250 seats 
with room for 100 in the gallery. The 
Choir Stalls provide room for 24 more. 
The church is entered through a vesti- 
bule with stairs at each side leading to 
the gallery. 

The Parish House extends across the 
Chancel end in the form of the top of 
the letter T and contains a Rector's 
study, social hall, kitchen, lounge and 
. robing room on the first floor, and class 
rooms above. 

In exterior appearance the building 
is distinctly Colonial; the walls are red 
brick with wood trim and cornices, and 
the roof is of slate. 

In the procession was the Vestry of 
the Church; visiting clergy; representa- 
tives of other Communions; The Stand- 
ing Committee; the Bishop. The service 
was arranged by a General Committee 
of the parish: W. L. Balthis, Chm., 
Mrs. R. L. Sanborn, Mrs. Bruce Hodges, 
Jr., E. H. Gregg, C. C. Dawson, Mrs. 



Bruce Wilson. The Rev. William 
Cravner is Rector of St. Marks. 



C. 



11 



Beyond Our Borders 



Dr. Harold L. Trigg, president of St. 
Augustine's College, Raleigh, N. C, has 
been awarded a National Urban League 
Certificate of Recognition in cognizance 
of his appointment by Governor W. Kerr 
Scott last year, to the Board of Educa- 
tion of the State of North Carolina. The 
awards are made, according to the cita- 
tion sent to Dr. Trigg by the Urban 
League's committee on awards, "to 
American Negro citizens everywhere 
who, in the course of the year, have 
contributed to the rich heritage of our 
nation." Dr. Trigg is the only Negro 
occupying such a position in the South. 



Sewanee Sunday — a day for consider- 
ation of the work of the University of 
the South — has been set for May 7, 



it has been announced by the Rt. Rev. 
Frank A. Juhan, Episcopal bishop of 
Florida and chancellor of the school. 

On that day members of the Episco- 
pal clergy throughout Sewanee's 22 own- 
ing dioceses will be asked to mention in 
some fitting way the work of the uni- 
versity, with emphasis on the work of 
its college of arts and sciences and the 
contribution to prep school education 
being made by Sewanee Military Acad- 
emy. 

"No offerings are asked, but vestries 
have been requested to consider placing 
Sewanee in the parish budget," Bishop 
Juhan said. 

Daniel Baker College, located at 
Brown wood, Texas, became the first 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Hymnal 1940 Companion; Book of Common 
Prayer; A Prayer Book for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy, lay officials 
and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, and their 
immediate families. Services include individual insurance programming 
and assistance to parish officials in preparing and establishing plans 
for retirement of lay employees. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire, windstorm and extended coverage. Insurance on prop- 
erty owned by or closely affiliated with the Church, and on the resi- 
dences and personal property of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 

20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



12 



Episcopal Church college in the South- 
west when the property was accepted by 
Bishop C. Avery Mason of the diocese 
of Dallas. The transfer has been ap- 
proved by the school's board of trustees. 
The property is valued at $750,000. Of- 
ficials said the college will offer a four- 
year course in the arts and sciences "in 
the light of the Christian Gospel.'' 



zines sent regularly; 6,562 donors of 
current magazines; 1,210,174 maga- 
zines in quantity; 21,577 Bibles, prayer 
books, hymnals and Testaments; 83,- 
829 books; 64,720 leaflets; 22,471 news- 
paper supplements; 820,960 greeting 
cards; 142,607 pictures, calendars, 
games, scrapbooks, etc.; 5,929 music, 
sheet or in books or records; 4,344 cases 
:>f aid to diocesan institutions. 



Church of England Bishop Stephen C. 
Xeill, associate general secretary of the 
World Council of Churches, who was of 
the most widely acclaimed speakers at 
General Convention last year, is on a 
three-month tour of East and West Af- 
rica to investigate theological training 
there for the International Missionary 
Council. He will report on trends and 
tendencies in the areas he visits, as they 
affect the work of recruiting training and 
supporting the ministry. 



The Church Periodical Club, in a peri- 
od of a year, rendered service to 87 dio- 
ceses and missionary districts. Among 
services reported were 18,157 maga- 



An analysis of ways of spending the 
national income of a population of 149,- 
215,000 Americans, as of July 1, 1949, 
showed that living expenses consumed 
60.5%; direct government taxes 15.3%; 
savings 11.2%; and contributions to 
welfare organizations, churches, cultural 
institutions, hospitals, missions and col- 
leges, 1%. The total income was esti- 
mated at $220,000,000,000, and the per 
capita income $1474.24. The giving for 
Church and charity are at an all-time 
low. 



Churchwoman Kathleen Moore is 
head of the women's division of the 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size 4V2 by 6 3 /s". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr.. O.OJ5. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Amhevill. 



13 



VESTMENTS 
CHOIR AND CLERGY 

For tho Clergy — 

SURPLICES 

CASSOCKS— ALBS 

STOLES— TIPPETS 

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For the Choir — 

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SKIRTS 

Ask for a catalog 

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1907 WALNUT ST. PHILA. 3, PA. 




THE BOOK ORDER SHOP 

OF HENRY TALBOT SHARP 

21 Wall Street, Asheville, North Carolina 

Can Fill Your Order for Any Book at 

Publishers Rates Strictly, Postage Prepaid; 

Shipments Direct. 

Featuring Morehouse-Gorham Titles. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

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Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 2-2461 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Complete Heating Plants 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



Savannah, Ga., police department. 
Churchwomen Gladys Hartley is a po- 
licewoman in the same city. Both are 
members of St. Paul's parish. The work 
of policewomen in Savannah is largely 
helping offenders to become reestab- 
lished as good members of society. 



Bishop Stephen F. Bayne of Olympia 
will be one of the leading speakers at the 
centennial Church of England congress 
to be held at Christchurch, Wellington, 
New Zealand, May 16 to 21. The theme 
of the congress will be "God's Word 
and God's World." The celebration will 
be held in conjunction with the centenary 
of the Canterbury Province of New 
Zealand. 



JOHN T. FLYNN AND THE FEDERAL 
COUNCIL 

Many Churchmen has been up-set and 
alarmed by the unhappy reference to 
the Federal Council of Churches of 
Christ in America made by John T. 
Flynn in his THE ROAD AHEAD, 
AMERICA'S CREEPING REVOLU- 
TION (Devin-Adair, $2.50). Needless 
to say, his treatise is what one might 
suspect from a leftist who swung to the 
right and didn't know where to stop. If 
any HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN 
reader wants to get the other side of the 
picture, he should write to the Federal 
Council, 297 Fourth Avenue, New York 
10, N. Y., for the pamphlet entitled THE 
TRUTH ABOUT THE FEDERAL 
COUNCIL OF CHURCHES. Out- 
Church has a stake in the name and pur- 
pose of the Federal Council; our Church 
has given it great leadership again and 
again. In a real sense, the attack of a 
complete reactionary against the Coun- 
cil is an attack upon our own purpose. 
If you have read THE ROAD AHEAD 
get the pamphlet, THE TRUTH 
ABOUT THE FEDERAL COUNCIL. 



14 



EPISCOPALIANS AND CHURCH 
WORLD SERVICE 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 

(March 29, 1950) carries a report of 
denominational support to Church World 
Service for the year ending December 
31, 1950; The Protestant Episcopal 
Church heads the list with contributions 
amounting to over $459,000.00. The 
CWS program is one of the only con- 
crete signs of the ecumencial movement 
in the world. Episcopalians have an un- 
fortunate reputation from some sections 
of the "larger Church'' of being cool 
towards the immediacy of a ''coming 
great Church." If truly our hearts are 
where our treasures are, this not un- 
common reputation we have needs aired 
in the breeze — $459,000 is a lot of dol- 
lars! It is interesting to see that one of 
the denominations which is making the 
biggest noise concerning the ecumencial 
movement; a communion with over 8,- 
000,000 church members supported CWS 
in '49 to the tune of $82,293. Another de- 
nomination popularly known as being 
super-evangelical, of small membership, 
gave $231,092! The largest Christian 
body in the South supported the pro- 
gram with a piddling $10,000. Statistics 
are never conclusive of spirit and heart, 
but they show direction. The largest of 
the denominations claimed that it could 
not support CWS as much as they should 
because they have their own denomina- 
tional program; which Communion 
doesn't: The '49 fiscal report of CWS 
can allow us real pride, not to rest on 
our laurels, but to increasingly become 
aware of the Church World Service pro- 
gram and its financial needs. 



Boston, Mass. — Deciding that sand- 
wiches can help to ensure increased 
Church attendance on weekdays by 
business people with limited time, Trin- 
ity Episcopal Church supplies good food, 
reasonably priced and quickly served in 
the parish house, after noon services. 




15 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

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Tfie Patterson School 



Episcopal. School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of" Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



Mrs* B, P„ Holmes, 
15 Ed^emont RcU, 
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LAYMEN TO CONTINUE 

In a letter to the bishops of the 
Church, Robert D. Jordan announces 
that the Department of Promotion of 
the National Council is now ready to 
proceed with a continuation of the lay- 
men's training program which was so 
splendidly successful last year. 

At the February Council meeting, 

SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 




when it was decided with enthusiasm, 
that the training program must go on, 
it was emphasized that its value, ed- 
ucationally, surpassed the fondest hopes. 
"It has opened a field of opportunity and 
need which cannot be ignored. The re- 
sponse of the laymen themselves has 
convinced us that we have just begun to 
scratch the surface of this vast reservoir 
of power within the Church." 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furniihed upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



{MfrtgWanti 
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St. Marks - Gastonia - 29th Annual Convention 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



Hi 



(Hijurrijman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



EDITOR'S NOTE 

THIS ISSUE of the Highland 

Churchman carries some news from the 
28th Diocesan Convention held last 
month; no attempt has been made to 
cover comprehensively all the proceed- 
ings of the Convention. We hope that all 
Churchmen in the Diocese will read 
carefully the full and official account of 
the Convention as found in The Jour- 
nal when it is published and sent to 
their Church. Anything printed herein 
concerning the Convention is subject to 
the correction of The Journal. 

EVERY ISSUE of the Highland 
Churchman carries some news from the 
National and Provincial Church, how- 
ever such coverage is limited. We feel 
a Churchman cannot be fully informed 
by merely reading, this modest paper. 
Along with The Highland Church- 
man on his library table should be 
Church Witness, and the like. A 
good Churchman is an informed Church- 
man. 



CONVENTION NEWS 



THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS 

Bishop Henry compared the renewed 
life in the Diocese to the great increases 
accomplished at the Church of the As- 
cension, Hickory, seat of the Annual 
Convention. In Hickory the building 
fund boomed from $300 to £100,000,; 
current budget from $4,000 to $14,000; 
attendance trebled, and, in two and one- 
half years 90 persons have been received 
into the Church. The recognition of the 
Church of the Ascension is a recognition 
of the total work in the Diocese. 

The Bishop declared that the finan- 
cial structure of the Diocese was sound, 
in spite of the fact that the Budget has 
been greatly increased. 

Special recognition was given to the 
Laymens Work in the Diocese, headed 
by A. B. Stoney, Morganton. Here is a 



new phase of work in the diocese which 
accomplished great things within the 
past year, especially in preparing the 
parishes and missions for the expanded 
program. Ten laymen spent much valu- 
able time in presenting the program to 
the Churches. The Lay Readers of the 
Diocese accounted for 400 daily offices 
(morning prayer; evening prayer) in 
missions where there is no resident lead- 
ership. Nine churches received the ser- 
vices of the Church which would not 
have been otherwise possible. To do this, 
lay leaders traveled thousands of 
miles at their own expense. Lay leader- 
ship also made possible the success of 
the Patterson School finance campaign, 
still in progress. 

Church buildings and properties, are, 
for the most part, in fine shape. New 



CONVENTION NEWS 



buildings, extensive repairs, and in- 
creased facilities are evident every- 
where over the Diocese. 

Three new missions are begun, and 2 
mission churches reopened for use; An- 
drews, Murphy, West Asheville, Grace 
Asheville, and St. Johns, Upwards. _ 

For the churches without resident 
clergy, the retired clergy gave their ser- 
vices to the Diocese in splendid and un- 
selfish measure. Due to these ministries, 
most all of the churches received the 
sacrament of Holy Communion at least 
monthly. 

The Bishop commended the work of 
the retired clergy: The Rev. Messers 
Duncan, Kennedy, Sill, Saylor, Cary- 
Elwes, Dobbins, Farnum, and Taylor. 

There were more confirmations with- 
in the Diocese in 1949 than in any one 
year in the past sixteen; the total num- 
ber confirmed was 333. There are 7 
Postulants and 4 Candidates for Holy 
Orders recorded. There was one ordina- 
tion. Five clergy were transferred out of 



the Diocese; 4 transferred in. 

The Bishops record shows the follow- 
ing personal acts: Holy Communion cel- 
ebrated 58 times; 66 Daily Offices read; 
14 baptisms; 4 marriages; 5 burials; 331 
Confirmations within the Diocese, 26 
;onfirmed outside the Diocese. The Bish- 
op delivered 134 sermons and 99 addres- 
ses. He attended 73 meetings and held 
,124 personal conferences. He conduct- 
ed 2 confirmation classes and one lay 
readers school. Beyond these activities, 
he attended the General Convention of 
the Church in San Francisco. 

Although the confirmation list is grat- 
ifying, the Bishop suggested that each 
parish and mission set an unoffocial 
goal of 10% of an increase in communi- 
cant strength each year. 

The Bishop, in regards to Diocesan fi- 
nance, suggested that there would be no 
"special" offerings except the Eastertide 
Offering for Kanuga, the Thanksgiving 
Offering for Thompson Orphanage, and 
the Seminary Sunday offering. 



THE STATE OF THE CHURCH 

The Committee on the State of the 
Church reported that there were around 
5000 communicants of the Church in the 
Diocese and a total of 6,000 baptized 
persons. There was an increase of 60 
baptisms in the past twelve months. 

The total giving in parishes and mis- 
sions was $419,742 as compared with 
$305,197 for the year previous. New 
building programs are in process or 
have been effected in Hickory, Gastonia, 
Hendersonville, Marion, Shelby, F) itch- 
er, Cherokee, and St. Mattias, Asheville. 

In the "One World in Christ" Offer- 
ing for March 12th, the receipts were 
$7,000 in response to the $4,500 goal. 

A great need for clergymen is evi- 
denced in the Diocese. Four missions 
have no regular schedule of services at 
all. Great opportunities exist everywhere 
in the area which is populated with an 
estimated 900,000 people. 



LAYMEN'S REPORT 

The Diocesan Committee on Laymens 
Work added much to the diocesan life 
this past year. The expanded program of 
the national church was shouldered by 
the laymen in unprecedented fashion. 
Mr. Stoney expressed his appreciation 
for the 100% support which the ten 
members of the Diocesan Committee 
gave him and the total program. The 
Chairman urged that the interest and 
enthusiasm be forwarded into the days 
ahead by (1) making the Diocesan 
Mens Convention at Patterson School on 
the 3rd and 4th of June a success, and, 
(2) by cooperating with the national pro- 
gram for laymens work which will be 
expanded this Fall. Mr. Stoney ex- 
pressed his belief that the total success 
of the laymens program was due to the 
untiring leadership of the Bishop of the 
Diocese. 



3 



CONVENTION NEWS 



DIOCESAN ELECTIONS 

The Executive Council: The Rev. Richard Lee and the Rev. Gale Webbe; Mes- 
sers. E. P. Dameron and Manly Whitener. 

The Standing Committee: The Rev. Messers. Campbell, Jenkins, Burke, and 
Tuton; Messers. E. S. Hartshorne, A. B. Stoney, Wm. Redwood, and V. J. Brown. 

Provincial Synod Delegates: The Rev. Messers. Jenkins, Morgan, Webbe, 
Lea veil, Lackey, Tuton; Messers. E. L. Kemper, James Gwynn, George Weise, W. 
L. Balthis, E. S. Hartshorn, and Hall Walton. 

Patterson School Board: Mrs. E. L. Kemper, Ed. Hartshorn, Jr., and the Rev. 
G. Mark Jenkins. 

Kanuga Board of Managers: The Rev. James P. Burke and Mrs. Francis Field. 

Trustees to St. Mary's: The Rev. Boston Lackey and Mrs. A. B. Stoney. 

Valle Crucis School Board: G. K. Moore, Mont Glacier, and Wm Redwood. 

Appalachian School Board: John Schley, Wilkinson, and Benj. Stevens. 

Diocesan Trustee: R. H. McDuffie. 

Trustee, University of the South: Thomas A. Coxe, Jr. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL RELATIONS 

"One of the basic problems in our 
world today is that of human relation- 
ships as set forth in the Christian doc- 
trine of Man, and the failure to give them 
expression in our social order. For those 
of us in this section of the world, it is 
the specific problem of the relationships 
between the white people and the Ne- 
groes. In this picture, we have the entire 
colored group deeply stirred with hopes 
and aspirations for the realization of 
the rights, privileges and opportunities 
predicated by Christianity and democ- 
racy. 

"We have a large number of white 
people, and the number is steadily grow- 
ing, who view with deep concern the 
lack of opportunities for the colored peo- 
ple, and are moved to assist them in 
every way possible to fit them for enter- 
ing a larger world of opportunities, priv- 
ileges and responsibilities. 

"We also have in the picture as facts, 
a number of the colored people, who are 
a problem to their own race, due to some 
extent to lack of opportunities to im- 
prove themselves. This also applies to 
the white race. Unfortunately, it is this 



worst which gets most publicity in the 
news. Along with this detrimental factor 
we have many white people and Negroes 
whose prejudices are stronger than their 
Christian love. 

"We feel that the time has come to 
make greater adventures in Christian 
social relationships. The church cannot 
enter the political arena, but knowing 
the boundaries of the Kingdom of God. 
she should be bold to express her mind 
on those matters which vitally affect hu- 
man life, so that the individual member 
may exercise his citizenship in the light 
of his Christian profession, and as a 
Christian to think and do those things 
which reflect and express the mind which 
was in Christ Jesus. 

"With the above facts in mind, we 
submit to this convention certain pro- 
positions and suggestions which we trust 
will be approved as reflecting our deep 
and serious concern. 

"We view as wrong the fact that so 
many persons of the Negro race, who are 
persons of Christian character and abil- 
ity, cannot find opportunities through 
which their talents may be employed. 
Men and women of college education are 
often forced into menial jobs in order 



CONVENTION NEWS 



tc earn a living. This is not confined to 
the Negro race. Many white people have 
the same difficulty. 

"We view it as unfortunate that there 
is such a lack of medical treatment avail- 
able to the colored people. This fault 
may not be deliberate, but it exists. In 
many communities it is being corrected. 
And Christians should always keep in 
mind the law that the strong shall help 
the weak. 

"We view it as bad that colored peo- 
ple are so frequently embarrased in trav- 
el, and in finding accommodations while 
traveling. 

"Because of the Christian concept of 
the worth and dignity of men, regard- 
less of color, lawlessness as expressed in 
lynchings, and in the Ku Klux Klan ac- 
tivities, as well as the commission of of- 
fenses which tend to provoke these evils, 
should be of deep concern to Christian 
people. We believe that local authorities 
should be held to strict responsibility 



for such lawlessness in their communi- 
ties. 

"We call upon our people to study 
these questions anew in the light of their 
Christian profession, and to make fresh 
endeavors to express the mind of Christ 
in all their human relationships. 

"In order, further, to better under- 
standing, and thus promote better re- 
lationships, we recommend that there be 
occasional exchange of pulpits between 
white and colored clergymen; also there 
be occasional services in which white 
and colored congregations join. 

"This convention heard with interest 
and deep appreciation the splendid ad- 
dress of Dr. Harold L. Trigg, Wednes- 
day evening, May 10. His courageous 
statements and wise counsel provide a 
Christian approach for our working to- 
gether in peaceful and happy solution of 
the racial problem." 

The Rev. Boston M. Lackey of Lenoir 
served as chairman of the committee. 



BUDGET ADOPTED 

The proposed budget for 1951 was 
adopted by the Convention with little 
or no thought as to cutting items pro- 
posed. There was however, considerable 
discussion concerning the method of 
reaching assessments and apportion- 
ments. Many persons feel that the 10% 
and 26% "across the board" appor- 
tionment is inequitable. A resolution was 
passed requesting investigation into oth- 
er methods of apportionment or ascer- 
taining next years schedule. 

Increases were noted in most of the 
budget divisions over this year. National 
Church Program increased from $7,500 
to $12,000. Total Diocesan Church Ex- 
pense increased from $20,000 to $28,- 
196.50 (less credits). The Diocese Ex- 
pense Fund $11,000 to $12,449.50 (also 
less credits). The remarkable growth in 
the Diocese is indicated in comparing 
the 1949 Budget with the 1950 Budget; 
in '49 the totals for National and Dio- 



cesan Church amounted to $25,360 — in 
'51 the same total will run to $40,546.50. 



WOMANS AUXILIARY REPORT 

Mrs. Martha B. Kemper, president of 
the womens work in the Diocese, com- 
mended the work of the Auxiliary 
throughout the past year. She reported 
that there were now 48 local branches of 
the Auxiliary in the Diocese with a mem- 
bership of over 1500 women; a goal of 
100% increase in membership was urged 
for the coming year. 

LInited Thank Offerings for 1949 to- 
taled $4,561.67— for the Triennial, $12,- 
688.69. There was an increase of $2,- 
699.69 in this past Triennial over the 
'46 Triennial. The All Saints Memorial 
Offering amounted to $686.66. The 
Spring District offerings of $132.01 was 
forwarded to the work at St. Cyprians, 
Lincolnton; the Fall District offerings 
amounted to $240.95. ' 



5 



CONVENTION NEWS 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHRIS- 
TIAN EDUCATION reported that 
many parishes and missions in the Dio- 
cese were following the interum curri- 
culum in the Church Schools, preparing 
for the time when the materials from 
National Council would be available. 
Good reports were received from the 
Diocesan Schools; special resolutions 
thanked the supporters of the current 
finance drive at Patterson School. Rich- 
ard G. Stone presented the program of 
St. Marys College, Raleigh. Dean Craig- 
hill Brown of St. Luke's, Sewanee, re- 
ported that in the Fall 75 seminarians 
were expected at the seminary, although 
facilities were now crowded with 65 stu- 
dents. THE DEPARTMENT OF PRO- 
MOTION expressed thanks that pro- 
motional suggestions were being used; 
the March 12th Offering being a good in- 
dication. Better press relations was urged 
and fuller use of radio facilities avail- 
able. KANUGA CONFERENCE re- 
ports were given by the Bishop who re- 
ported over #2,000.00 received from the 
Province from Eastertide Offerings. The 
problem of incorporation was being 
speedily settled for this assembly which 
is the largest conference of the Church in 
the United States. THE DEPART- 
MENT OF CHRISTIAN SOCIAL 
RELATIONS announced that 7 d.p.'s 
had found placement; our quota, 15 per- 
sons. 

President Harold L. Trigg's address 
to the Convention was ordered to be 
printed in THE CHURCHMAN during 
Brotherhood Week next; the expense 
for such extra printing to be covered 
through the generosity of All Souls', 
Biltmore. Miss Francis Query of the 
North Carolina Council of Churches was 
presented to the Convention; she com- 
mended Episcopalians for their interest 
and leadership in the work of the Coun- 
cil. The Department reported that the 
area of cooperation with other Christian 
bodies was becoming more clear and pos- 



itive. Minor changes in the Canon were 
moved by THE COMMITTEE ON 
CANONS: the canons were amended to 
give the Bishop more freedom in organ- 
izing missions. A motion to increase par- 
ish delegates at Convention from three 
to four was defeated. The Rev. James 
P. Burke was elected SECRETARY OF 
THE CONVENTION; the Rev. Peter 
Lambert, OGS, Assistant Secretary. 
Wm. M. Redwood was unanimously 
elected DIOCESAN TREASURER. In 
response to the BISHOP'S ADDRESS, 
it was moved that the goal of 10% in- 
crease in communicant strength for each 
parish and mission be set as an "official 
mark" for the Diocese. St. Mark's, Gas- 
tonia, extended a cordial invitation to 
the 29th ANNUAL DIOCESAN CON- 
VENTION in 1951. At the request of 
THE COMMITTEE ON CREDEN- 
TIALS the convention authorized the 
installation of a card index system for 
delegates seating at the next Conven- 
tion. The convention recognized the 
CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION, 
Hickory; the fine appointments of 
their new building was exceeded only 
by the gracious hospitality afforded the 
delegates by the Rector, Robert B 
Campbell, the Vestry of the Church and 
the whole Congregation. 



DR. TRIGG ON CHRISTIAN 
SOCIAL RELATIONS 

The Diocesan Convention was priv- 
ileged to hear Dr. Harold L. Trigg's 
forthright and honest approach to the 
race problem from a Christian view- 
point. The Church can be grateful for 
such an occasion. The address inspired 
a fine report from the Docesan Com- 
mittee on Christian Social Relations 
(printed in this issue), and, for the bene- 
fit of all peoples in the Diocese, Dr. 
Trigg's address will be printed in the 
February 1951 issue of the Highland 
Churchman on the occasion of Brother- 
hood Week. 



CLARIFICATION 

Old Saint Paul's Church, Lincoln County, has recently 
been sold and the grave yard within the center of the property 
still remains under the title and ownership of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina. Being Diocesan property the check 
payable for both building and land will be mailed to the 
treasurer of the Diocese and at the request of the Bishop of 
the Diocese the Rector of St. Lukes Church in Lincolnton was 
able to consumate an agreement whereby the purchaser will 
fence in the grave yard thereby protecting the graves from 
grazing animals and in addition will keep this Diocesan prop- 
erty in presentable condition. Several persons at Convention 
were somewhat confused as to ownership of the property 
which is entirely a Diocesan responsibility. 

Signed — The Rt. Rev. M. George Henry, 
Bishop of the Diocese 
The Rev. Richard J. Lee, Rector, 
St. Lukes, Lincolnton 



Summer Religion 

It is quite natural when the warm summer days come to search the out of door 
life and especially on Sunday. It is only right that we should have times of re-creation 
and I am sure that God wants us to enjoy the out of door life. However, this should 
not make us feel that we can miss common worship throughout the summer. One of 
the glories of the Episcopal Church is that there is always the early service on 
Sunday at 8 o'clock, which is finished at approximately 8:35, giving a full day to the 
out of door life to those who so desire and, indeed, making an even greater glory 
for that day having opened it with participation in the worship of God. We do not 
ever like to force people to do anything against their will but we might indicate 
that the Prayer Book which is meant to be our guide does in its offices of instruc- 
tion say as follows: Question: "What is your bounded duty as a member of the 
Church?" Answer: "My bounded duty is to follow Christ, to worship God every 
Sunday in His Church: and to work and pray and give for the spread of His King- 
dom." (Book of Common Prayer, page 291.) 

Might we also observe that our summer religious observance should extend to 
interesting concern for those who worship with us from far distances. The person 
in the pew next to you maye be a stranger in our midst and at least a kindly bow 
at the end of the service may go a long way towards making our visitors feel that 
we are happy that they, too, feel the importance of worshiping God. 

{Trinity Church Bulletin, Asheville, May 14, 1950) 



TEN PERCENTERS 



Taking a suggestion from the Bishop's 
Address, the 28th Annual Convention 
resolved that each Parish and Mission 
in the Diocese set a 10% increase in 
Confirmations as their goal for the com- 
ing year. There is no defense for anyone 
in refusing this challenge. Actually the 
goal is small enough at that! We are be- 
ing asked to add 1 member for every 
10 we already have, or, putting it anoth- 
er way, 10 churchmen are being asked 
to find just one other prospective church- 
man. If we cannot do that, we are in a 
sorry state of affairs. Our prediction is 
that if this challange is taken seriously 



by any 10 churchmen, the 10% will 
grow into larger percentages before the 
29th Annual Convention. Why not form 
a number of "10% Clubs" in your 
Church? As a goal, the 10% is a mini- 
mum goal. Although we like "round 
numbers," it would be a very happy oc- 
casion if we could report in the months 
ahead such figures as 30.096% or 63. 
903% or 88.29% or even (dare we) 
99 44/100%. The magic 99 44/100% 
has sold soap that floats — unlike soap, 
we cannot float alone and maintain our 
percentages. . . 



PATTERSON CAMP 



MARK JENKINS, Director 

The time is fast approaching when we 
will start our trek to Happy Valley for 
a week of Worship, Study, Play and 
Fellowship. 

Here are some things to remember: 

Age limits: 13-24. 

Time: July 2-8. 

Place: Patterson School. 

What to do now: Get your registra- 



tion in to the Director (with #1.00) right 
away. Registrations are already coming 
in and an overflow is expected — first 
registered, first served ! 

Your Minister has a supply of registra- 
tion blanks. When registrations are re- 
ceived, a mimeographed sheet of direc- 
tions will be mailed you — so please give 
your address. 

ALL OUT FOR PATTERSON 
CAMP! 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 






PATTERSON SCHOOL 


—JULY 2-8, 1950 




Name 






Age 




Address 










Parish or Mi 


ssion 


















Signature 


of Parent 


or Guardian 




I recommend the above named app 


icant to the Diocesan Camp. 






(Rector 


or Priest 


in Charge) 




Cut out this 
Church, 


application and 
Fletcher, N. C. 


mail to the Rev. Mark Jenkins, Calva 
, together with #1.00 registration fee. 


ry 



YOUTH NEWS 



CALVARY, FLETCHER 

By MARY CORPENING 

The Young Churchman's Club plan- 
ned Study Classes each Sunday evening 
during Lent on the subject suggested by 
the Department of Christian Education 
of the National Council, i.e., "The Holy 
Scripture." This study proved so popular 
that a demand was made at the end of 
Lent to have these classes the year round, 
once a month on the second Sunday 
evening of each month. Though these 
studies are sponsored by the Young 
Churchmen, the congregation attended 
in force with fifty or more out each time. 

Forty-six young people were present 
for our Corporate Communion on April 
30th. Breakfast was served in the Parish 
House after the Service and this was fol- 
lowed by the election of officers. The 
retiring President, Lillian Bowles, who 
has been in Chicago the past two months 
because of illness in her family, flew 
down to Fletcher to be present for the 
Corporate Communion and business 
meeting. The following officers were 
elected : 

William Plead, President. 



Earl Jones, Vice President. 
Peggy Creasman, Secretary. 
Abert Baldwin, Treasurer. 
Mary Corpening, News Reporter. 

Committees were appointed, and a 
program for the ensuing year was out- 
lined by the new President that promises 
to make this group the most active one 
in the Diocese. 

It was decided to have formal meet- 
ings on the first and third Sunday even- 
ings of each month, with the Study Class 
on the second Sunday evening, and in- 
formal meetings of various kinds at oth- 
er times. It was also passed by resolu- 
tion that all members would pledge their 
dues to the Club. 

Ralph ("Pete") Ward, Choir Director 
at Calvary, was elected Adult Advisor. 
One wonders if his election was influ- 
enced by his Jeep Station Wagon and 
expertness at cooking! We are happy to 
have one as interested and active in 
Youth work as our new Advisor. 

Watch this column for plenty of news 
from our Young Churchmen's Club of 
Calvary Church. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



LENTHE RUSH CAMPBELL 

Institutes 

The Workshop held in the different 
Districts were a great success. The en- 
thusiasm and large attendance were grat- 
ifying to those leaders who had spent 
much time and effort preparing the ma- 
terial. 

Bishop Henry gave an encouraging 
picture of the Diocese, but he also point- 
ed out those places where we need to 
concentrate our efforts. Even though 



the Workshops are over, "The doing of 
them has just begun." 

Did you know — 

That Lincolnton's Woman's Auxiliary 
helps pay the expenses of two college 
students: 

That Shelby pays monthly toward the 
expenses of a girl in school? 

That 25 women in Rutherfordton sub- 
scribe to a Church Paper? 

That the Bat Cave Auxiliary is spon- 



soring a boy at Patterson School: 

That St. Ann's, Brevard, adopted a 
child at Thompson Orphanage and sends 
gifts on special days? 

That the Auxiliary at St. Paul's, Ed- 
neyville, has joint meetings with the 
Methodists and Baptists? 

That St. Cyprians, Franklin, held a 
study class every week during Lent, con- 
ducted by The Reverend Rufus Morgan ? 
St. Cyprians was also well represented 
at the District Meeting? 

That All Soul's Biltmore, is most en- 
thusiastic about the special offering they 



give to the Bishop for his Discretionary 
fund? 

Annual Meeting 

Before this issue of the Highland 
Churchman reaches you the Annual 
Meeting of the Auxiliary will have been 
held at Kanuga. The dates were June 
8th and 9th. The Rev. Kenneth Morris, 
a former missionary to Japan, addressed 
the meeting on the work of the Church 
in Japan and showed a film on Japan. 
On the second day of the convention, 
Mrs. John A. Morson, president of the 
Woman's Auxiliary for the Province of 
Sewanee presented the provincial pro- 
gram for the coming year. 



LAYMEN AT WORK 



The First Annual Diocesan Laymens 
Conference was held at Patterson School 
on June 3rd and 4th. The advance agen- 
da indicated that here was a conference 
for the laymen and by the laymen and 
of the laymen. The clergy were conspic- 
uous by their absence, save for the guid- 
ance of the Bishop and the Rev. Arnold 
M. Lewis, Executive Secretary of the 
Presiding Bishops Committee on Lay- 
mens Work. Mr. A. B. Stoney gave his 
first report concerning the work of the 
revised laymens program to this time. 
Mr. James Peden led a discussion on 
"Organizing and Operating a Mens 
Club"; Cary Page on "The Laymens 
Training Program''; John T. Roughton 
on "The Brotherhood of St. Andrew"; 
Robert J. Putnam on "Lay Reading"; A. 
B. Stoney on "Adult Bible Classes". The 



Bishop of the Diocese discussed the 
problem of "Organizing a New Mission." 
The Rev. Arnold Lewis addressed the 
group concerning "The Laymens Job" 
and "The Laymens Program for 1950- 
1951." 

Mr. George Weise and Patterson 
School were good hosts to the Confer- 
ence. It is hoped that the Laymens An- 
nual Conference will grow more and 
more popular as the years go on, and 
that it will contribute measureably to 

the life of the Church in the Diocese. 
* * * 

The Highland Churchman reaches you 
in time to remind you of the Annual Lay- 
mens Conference of the Fourth Province 
to be held at the University of the South 
in Sewanee, Tennesse, on June 15th 
through 18th. 



Workshop On Church Music 



From a number of different sources 
has come the suggestion that an informal 
study-group or workshop on Liturgical 
Music be instigated within the Diocese. 
It appears that much of our heritage in 
good church music is not being used. 
There is a trend evident throughout the 
total church of new interest in this prob- 



lem, and there are resource people and 
materials available for such study. The 
Editor of this publication will be happy 
to act as a clearing house for your ex- 
pression of opinion. Perhaps there is 
enough interest abroad to bring about 
definite plans? 



10 



Within Our Borders 



Miss Lucy Fletcher, 165 Macon Av- 
enue, Asheville, has been appointed 
chairman of the BIRTHDAY THANK 
OFFERING for the Diocese. She re- 
minds us that all such offerings in hand 
should be sent to her by June 30th; 
that is the date for our report to National 
Council. The Birthday Offerings are re- 
ceived in the Church Schools from time 
to time as a thank offering from the chil- 
dren and youth. Varying from place to 
place, the offerings are received at birth- 
day times, or at appointed times in the 
year; in some places all offerings are re- 
ceived on Whitsunday. The National 
Council has indicated that the '49-' 50 
offerings will go to our schools in Li- 
beria . . . THE CHURCH SCHOOL 
LENTEN OFFERING PRESENTA- 
TIONS on the Second and Third Sun- 
days after Easter were marked by large 
offerings or good attendance. A record 
attendance was recorded at the Convoca- 
tion of Morganton Presentation on April 
30th. Dean Lambert reports that the 
Banner went to St. John's Marion 
Church School; Hickory received hon- 
orable mention. Valle Crucis had the 
largest number from the greatest dis- 
tance and is to be awarded a ]/-2 scholar- 
ship to Diocesan Camp. At the Convoca- 
tion of Asheville presentation at Trinity 
Church, the award for the highest per- 
capita offering went to St. Mary's, Ashe- 
ville; Holy Cross, Tryon was runner-up. 
APPALACHINA SCHOOL, PEN- 
LAND, N. C. desires information where 
a disused cottage or a chapel reed organ 
may be found . . . THE MISSION OF 
THE GOOD SHEPHERD, Tryon, 
holds its services, Evensong each Sun- 
day at 4 p. m., and Holy Communion at 
9 a. m. on the second Sunday of the 
month. The Rev. George Dayson has 
been in charge since January. The 
Church of the Ascension, Hickory, has 



sent some used pews and a prayer desk 
to the Good Shepherd. The building is 
in good repair after improvements made 
two years ago . . . ST. MARY'S 
CHURCH, ASHEVILLE, sponsored an 
Acolytes' Festival on Sunday after As- 
cension, May 21. The choir from Christ 
School was at hand, and the Rev. Peter 
Lambert, OGS, was the preacher at the 
afternoon service. Refreshments were 
served during the social hour after the 
service . . . THE WITNESS for May 
11th carried a feature article concerning 
THE CHURCH OF THE ASCEN- 
SION, HICKORY, in its "story of the 
week." The cover of the issue carries a 
picture of the new Church at Hickory, 
and there are many pictures of Church 
personnel and people within the covers. 
The feature story tells of the amazing 
growth of Ascension in the past few 
years; of the faithful and progressive 
congregation, and of the stellar leader- 
ship of the Rector and his wife. Another 
feature article in that issue concerns the 
"life story" of the Rev. Robert Camp- 
bell, Rector at Hickory. The Diocese 
should be very happy that one of its 
parishes was selected for this national 
honor. The WITNESS' circulation of 
600,000 assures the Church of the As- 
cension and the Diocese a wide fame, 
which of course we deserve . . . Mrs. 
William Post has been named hostess 
to TRINITY PARISH, ASHEVILLE. 
Trinity's external woodwork has under- 
gone a recent painting . . . The series 
of Lenten week-night addresses on 
Church History heard at ALL SOULS', 
BILTMORE, have been published in 
book form, and may be purchased for 
one dollar . . . PRE-1940 HYMNALS 
may be had for the asking at Trinity 
Church, Asheville, and St. Andrews 
Church, Canton . . . 



11 



Beyond Our Borders 



NATIONAL BUDGET LAGS— At 

the April meeting of National Council, 
the Presiding Bishop spoke on the stat- 
us of the 1950 budget. He said that it is 
not yet possible to announce definite or 
final figures as to the result of the re- 
cent special campaign, ONE WORLD 
IN CHRICT; that many dioceses are 
continuing their efforts to reach their 
quotas; that many dioceses have not 
yet received final reports from their par- 
ishes and missions, and that where dio- 
cesan campaigns were combined with the 
national campaign, there is sure to be 
an elimination of over-payments. (In 
May it appears that the campaign is 
#750,000 below expectations. — Ed.) He 
said very positively that this is no 
time for discouragement or despair, and 
that we must look forward to the cam- 
paign next fall as being really crucial. 

Bishop Sherrill explained that certain 
items have been "withheld" or tempor- 
arily set aside in making the adjusted 
budget calculations. He emphasized that 
items are not out of the budget, but are 
withheld until money to cover them is 
in sight. Among the withheld items are 
the following: 

The budget item for world relief was 
under the withholding plan; 

The Deparment of Christian Educa- 
tion, for the present, will not fill a num- 
ber of executive positions; 

Appointment of new missionaries will 
be curtailed for the present; 

The position of assistant to the direct- 
or of the Department of Promotion will 
not be filled at this time; 

Missionary salaries which were to be 
increased retroactive to January 1 will 
be increased July 1. 

The Presiding Bishop said that this 



is not a time for criticism of anyone. 
Fine gains over previous years have 
been made in many dioceses. The train- 
ing program for laymen had a fine in- 
fluence wherever used. 

Bishop Sherrill expressed his grati- 
tude for all who helped in the recent 
campaign. He found great enthusiasm 
in many parts of the Church, though 
not in all. He sees the need now for plan- 
ning, for work, for education all through 
the Church. "Not despair but determi- 
nation, is the need as we face the Every 
Member Canvass next fall," the Pre- 
siding Bishop concluded. 

The Ven. Norman L. Foote, at present 
Archdeacon of Montana, will take office 
August 1 as director of the National 
Town and Country Institute, the 
Church's training project for workers in 
the rural Church field. Mr. Foote is 35 
years old, graduate of Princeton and the 
General Theological Seminary. He has 
had wide experience as missionary in 
rural districts in Montana, and is a 
member of the Joint Commission on 
Rural Work . . . 

Honolulu, T. H., — St. Christopher's 
Mission, Kailua, became a self-support- 
ing parish on May 1, just two years after 
a resident priest took charge. He is the 
Rev. Richard M. Trelease, Jr. The Mis- 
sionary District of Honolulu now has 
seven parishes which are fully self-sup- 
porting. There are 25 missions and 11 
unorganized missions . . . 

Washington, D. C. — Cathedral Prayer 
is a new weekly transcribed radio pro- 
gram from Washington Cathedral, car- 
ried over Washington station WQQW. It 
is sponsored by the Washington Com- 
mittee of the National Cathedral Asso- 
ciation, and is to be aired by stations in 
a number of other cities. Cathedral 
Prayer is conducted by Dean John W. 
Suter, and consists of music, short ser- 



12 



mon, Bible readings, a prayer and ben- 
ediction. The musical part of the pro- 
gram is directed by Paul Callaway, 
Cathedral organist and choirmaster. The 
program is intended to interest non- 
church goers, as well as Church mem- 
bers . . . 

Burlington, N. J., — Plainsong was first 
used in this country at St. Barnabas' 
Church, Burlington. Founded in 1856, 
the legal title of the church is "The 
Free Church of St. Barnabas," which 
proclaims that it was one of the first 
churches in America which did not col- 
lect pew rents. In its 94 years it has 
had only six rectors . . . 

Trenton, X. J., — Twenty young peo- 
ple are attending a series of pre-martial 
instruction classes at St. James' Church, 
Trenton. The rector, the Rev. Gerald R. 
Minchin, speaks of the spiritual aspects 
of family life and the need for religious 
teaching in family circles. Thomas A. 
Maier, instructor in Consumer Educa- 
tion at Trenton Central High School, 
lectures on "The Family Budget and 
Finance." Dr. Harrington English, psy- 
chologist, leads the group and Dr. Sey- 



mour S. Philo lectures on the physical 
side of marriage . . . 

The Moravian Church of Great 
Britain has just joined the World Coun- 
cil of Churches, bringing the total of 
member Churches — Anglican, Orthodox 
and Protestant — up to 156 in 44 coun- 
ties . . . 

Church World Service is seeking pub- 
licity for its new program of contributed 
supplies. It is requested that no clothing 
be sent to CWS warehouses unless it is 
accompanied with an 8c a pound contri- 
bution, to cover handling, warehousing, 
insurance and inland transportation. 
CWS no longer has funds with which to 
carry on the program. The need for 
clothing of all kinds is still great in 
China, Europe, Korea, Burma and the 
Holy Land. All clothing must be sent 
tc CWS warehouses prepaid, with check 
to cover the 8c handling charge. CWS 
warehouses are 214 East 21st St., New 
York 10, N. Y.; New Windson, Md.; 
510 South Elm Ave., Webster Groves 
19, Mo.; and %Pacific Ports Industries, 
Inc., 100 Brannan St., San Francisco 7, 
Calif . . . 

The Press and Publications Board of 



The People's Anglican Missal 

(AMERICAN EDITION) 

For Churchmen, young and old 
Size AVz by 6%". Bound in a blue, dur- 
able, fabricated cloth; tooled cover; print- 
ed on slightly tinted paper, to increase 
legibility. Ordinary and Canon in two 
colors. 
Price $5.00 at your Bookstore or from 

THE FRANK GAVIN 
LITURGICAL FOUNDATION 

Mount Sinai Long Island New York 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



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13 



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the Church Assembly of the English 
Church has held a week's school of 
Church journalism, the first to be held 
in the country. Subjects discussed in- 
cluded handling of Church news to the 
press; how to produce better parish 
magazines; use of pictures; and interest- 
ing the laity in Church organizations. 
Representatives of leading newspapers 
addressed the school. There was an ex- 
tensive exhibit of publicity materials, 
including visual aids, posters and miscel- 
laneous pamphlets and leaflets. The 
school was held in the Church House, 
Westminster . . . 

Bishop Harry S. Kennedy of Honolulu 
writes: "You will be glad to know that 
we have started new work on the island 
of Lanai, and that I am going to send 
over a priest each month for services. 
This is a community of about 4,000 
people. We have 25 communicants." . . . 

Girls of the Girls' Friendly Society 
have been making international and in- 
terracial understanding real by writing 
to girls in other countries. Mail has 
gone between over 3,000 different cor- 
respondents to ten countries. With so 
many Japanese young people anxious 
to try out their English, the GFS is 
swamped with letters from Japan, from 
boys and girls mostly between the ages 
of 16 and 22. GFS now says to all 
Church young people "If you would like 
to adventure in friendliness' in this way, 
it does not matter whether you belong 
to GFS or not. Send your name, age and 
address to Pen Pal Secretary, Girls' 
Friendly Society, 386 Fourth Ave., New 
York 16, N. Y. She will try to introduce 
you to world brotherhood by way of a 
postage stamp, and satisfy the Japanese 
correspondent who wrote wistfully, 'I 
am sitting here with a map before me 
wondering if my letter will be answered. 

Via the Messenger of the Panama 
Canal Zone comes the story of a Church 
of England parish at West Hoathly 
which is temporarily without heat. It 
announces "When the temperature falls 
below fifty, the sermon will be reduced 



14 



to three minutes." Commenting, the 
Messenger said, "The Tropics have ad- 
vantages . . . 

The Rev. Joseph W. Zneimer, recently 
called to be rector of St. Matthew's 
Church, Buffalo, is a former banker. 
He gave up his business career in 1941 
to study for Holy Orders, and was on 
the staff of Trinity Parish, New York 
City, then held rectorates in Minnesota. 
He is a Rutgers graduate and has held 
important positions in banking and law 
firms in New York, Newark and Min- 
neapolis. He is a graduate of the New 
Jersey Law School . . . 



BOOKS FOR CHURCHMEN 

THE CHRISTIAN DEMAND FOR 
SOCIAL JUSTICE, a Signet Special 
book, 35c. Issued by the Joint Commis- 
sion on Social Reconstruction of the 
General Convention. 

We all know that our time is one of 
far-reaching political and economic 
change in many parts of the world. Most 
of us dread such changes in America, 
and sum up the situation as a struggle 
between captalistic democracy, the 
Christian way of life, and atheistic Rus- 
sian communism. But if we are either 
to understand what is going on in our 
world or to take our part as responsible 
Christian citizens in the decisions which 
America must make, we must be better 
informed as to the facts and ideas in- 
volved in the struggle, and we must 
face the need for social betterment in our 
own and other countries. We must learn 
why, even in prosperous America, Chris- 
tians cannot be mere defenders of "the 
American Way," as embodied in mid- 
century American institutions. 

To help adult readers and to provide 
in brief compass, adequate materials 
for study and discussion, the Joint Com- 
mission on Social Reconstruction of our 
Church's General Convention has is- 
sued THE CHRISTIAN DEMAND 
FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, a book of 126 
pages, Signet Special #744. Published 
in this popular series for 35c a copy are 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

OUR MAGAZINE 

POSSIBLE 



TALMAN 


OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 


8 College St., Asheville 


CALL 2105 




TfieTerttersofi ScJioot 




bjjy- "\£ikaS 



Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Mountains of 
Western North Carolina. Accredited. Grades 6-12. 
41st yr. 1300-acre country estate. Low cost. 

George F. Weise, Supt. 
COLLEGE Ledgerwood. N. C. TYPING 
PREPARATORY FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



IS 



Mrs* B* P*, Holnes # 
15 Edgenont Bd»^ 
AshevilXc, H» C*. 

eight articles, chosen by the Commis- 
sion from the papers read at its regional 
conferences. 

—Reviewer: BISHOP NASH 

CHAPTERS IN CHURCH HIS- 
TORY. By P. M. Dawley. New York. 
The National Council 1950. $1.50. 

It is an encouraging thing that at long 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



ASHEVILLE 



1 CENT 1 



T-' 



last the Church is sponsoring such a 
competent piece of historical writing for 
the education of her people in the mat- 
ters which pertain to their faith and fel- 
lowship; that at last we have the cour- 
age to build up an official literature of 
adult education of which we have no 
cause to feel ashamed. 

—Reviewer: PERCY V. NORWOOD 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All tcademic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education Art — Expiession — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus- -Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis com a. 

Catalogue and Book oi -"ie»v.- fjihished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 




Manti 
urcjman 




VOL. XX 



AUGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1950 



No. 12 




§>t. HJarg'fi (fttjurrtf - Mmxxn (Emk 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



Sty? i|tgtjianb 
(Etjunrtjman 



St. Andrews Church 



Canton, N. C. 



Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943. at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry. 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Win. M. 
Redwood. 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville. N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



SANDING COMMITTEE? 

The mere dropping of a "t", an error 
in printing the 1950 Diocesan Journal, 
has changed the face and function of 
a most important committee in Episcopal 
diocesan polity. — On page 6 of the 
JOURNAL we discover that we have a 
Sanding Committee instead of a Stand- 
ing Committee. Lest by chance a young 
or unknowing mission committee or ves- 
try apply to that committee for estimates 
on sanding their church floor, we make 
haste to note the printer's error. The 
occasion of the error has given us all an 
opportunity to make sly and slightly 
wicked remarks concerning the gentle- 
men on that committee- — all in good hu- 
mor, of course. It will be unnecessary 
for us to review the functions and powers 
of the Standing Committee; we need 
only recognize that as a steering com- 
mittee it gives real direction to the 
Church in the Diocese. In its executive 
work, it takes many burdens from the 
shoulders of the Bishop, allowing him 
more time and energy for his Apostolic 
ministry. 



In so far as the Standing Committee 
makes the crooked places straight and 
the rough places plain — it is truly a 
SANDING COMMITTEE. 



OUR COVER 

OUR COVER gives us the opportun- 
ity to salute this small but strong con- 
gregation of Christ's Church. It fur- 
ther demands that we do some soul- 
searching as to our attitudes toward the 
rural church. Miss Virginia Speers, a 
communicant of St. Mary's, Beaver 
Creek, so kindly forwarded us copy of 
the following article written for a recent 
issue of THE SKYLAND POST, West 
Jefferson. N. C. 



ST. MARY'S HISTORY RECALLED 
By Virginia Speers 

On Sunday, June 25, a special occas- 
ion was observed at St. Mary's Epis- 
copal Church, Beaver Creek. It marked 
the completion of much needed and ex- 
tensive repairs and improvements to the 
church property. The day was graced by 
the visitation of the Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, Bishop of the Diocese, who 
brought greetings to the congregation. 
He was also Celebrant at Holy Com- 
munion. 

The improvements to the church were 
not intended to include the large amount 
of work done, but merely started out to 
put a new foundation in place of the 
weakened wooden underpinning put 
there when the church was built, forty- 
five years ago. However, when this was 
done, the members decided that other 
repairs should be made and the work 
was continued. A new block foundation 
was put under the entire church, a com- 
plete new roof was put on, the exter- 
ior was painted, the interior walls and 
floor shellaced, a new flue built, a new 
plank fence built, the lawn graded and 
grassed and other minor repairs made. 
The total cost of the material and work 
en the church was approximately $1500. 
This has been paid with the exception 
of about $400. Over $1 100 has been paid 
on this work by donations from members 



and friends and they expect to finish 
payment of this within a few months. 

St. Mary's having a membership of 
about twenty persons, was built in 1905, 
being the first Episcopal church in this 
section. The first minister to work in the 
county was Rev. Milnor Jones, who was 
sent to Valle Crucis in 1894 and directed 
by the Bishop to extend his ministrations 
to Ashe. He made his first visit in 1895 
and was so encouraged by the interest 
he found that he continued coming once 
a month, holding services at the home 
of Mr. Rufus Hamilton and in the Bea- 
ver Creek Academy, which was leased 
by the church. 

In June 1896, Rev. Jones and Bishop 
Cheshire came to have a service in the 
academy and were spending a few days 
at the home of Mr. Hamilton. On Sun- 
clay morning a delegation of citizens 
came to the house and informed Mr. 
Hamilton that the Bishop would not 
be allowed to have the service. In spite 
of the warning, the Bishop and Mr. 
Jones gathered together their supplies 
and went to the academy. More than a 
hundred men were gathered there and 
forbid them entering. The Bishop told 
them he had an appointment to hold a 
a service there and expected to do so. He 
started to enter and was forcibly pre- 
vented from doing so. Being unable to 
overcome such force he repaired to the 
home of Mr. William H. Hamilton and 
had a service in the yard. Nineteen per- 
sons were confirmed and a large con- 
gregation heard the sermon. 

In spite of such inauspicious begin- 
nings the interest in the church continued 
and in September, 1902, Rev. William 
R. Savage took charge of a number of 
missions in Watauga and Ashe, includ- 
ing Holy Trinity at Glendale Springs 
and St. Mary's at Beaver Creek, holding 
the first service at the home of Mr. 
Rufus Hamilton in January, 1903 after 
which he held services there and at 
other homes for sometime. 



In the summer of 1903 the eight 
members of the mission living at Todd 
organized St. Matthews mission. 

During the year 1903 decided steps 
were taken toward raising a building 
fund, though some money had been 
raised for that object several years past. 
Through the untiring efforts of a few 
members, principally Mr. and Mrs. Ru- 
fus Hamilton, who procured aid in and 
out of the field, the fund grew rapidly 
until in the summer of 1904 ground was 
broken for a church and on Saturday, 
Dec. 23, 1905, the church was used for 
the first time, the Christmas Tree cele- 
bration being held in it. On Sunday, the 
24th of December, morning prayer was 
said and the Holy Communion celebrat- 
ed for the first time in the new church. 

The church was consecrated by the 
Rev. Junius M. Horner, Bishop, on 
August 24, 1906, with Reginald N. Wil- 
cox, of Hendersonville, preaching the 
sermon. 

The church, having a small member- 
ship, and not being able to afford a full 
time minister has been served by a num- 
ber of ministers having a large territory 
to cover and services have been infre- 
quent, usually once a month. 

In June, 1947, Rev. James McKeown 
was appointed by Bishop Gribbin, as 
missionary to Boone, Glendale, Beaver 
Creek and Todd and regular weekly 
services were held for more than a year. 
However, more than a year ago Rev. 
McKeown moved to Texas and there 
has been no one to hold services since 
that time. 

Having a seating capacity of approx- 
imately 125, the church is one of the 
loveliest in this section. 

Names on the church register show 
that the Rev's. W. R. Savage, J. N. At- 
kins, J. B. Sill, George Hurlburt, Hugh 
Dobbins and James McKeowan have 
been among those ministering most to 
this congregation during its nearly fifty 
years of existence. 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY FALL UNITED THANK OFFERING AND 
CORPORATE COMMUNION WILL BE OBSERVED ON ST. MICHAELS AND 
ALL ANGELS, SEPTEMBER 29TH. 



3 



THE MYTH OF THE RURAL CHURCH— EDITORIAL 



The old folk-song, "The little brown 
church in the vale," may bring nostalgic 
memories to many Americans who were 
first nurtured in the Faith within the 
shaded walls of a little mission church. 
However, very few people would ser- 
iously consider the church in the wild- 
wood to be a typical American church — 
and yet, such is the case. Contrary to 
popular opinion, the rural church is the 
typical American church. Let us look 
at the facts. 

Statistics show that, except for Ro- 
man Christendom, the great percentage 
of congregations in American Churches 
are located in small town or rural areas. 
In the Protestant Episcopal Church an 
estimated 66% of our congregations 
are in "town and country" areas. Over 
68% of Methodist charges are "circuits" 
of two to nine mission churches. The 
percentage of Southern Baptist congre- 
gations in rural areas must be very high, 
too. The fact remains — our Church is 
66% rural. 

The time has come to recognize the 
importance of these facts. There is a 
popular myth, which says that the 
Episcopal Church is by-and-large urban 
and suburban; that there are more Epis- 
copal Churches "on the avenue" than on 
country lane. Coincident with that myth 
i-, an attitude in many minds that the 
doctrine, teachings, and polity of the 
Episcopal Church is more suitable to 
the debonair and pseudo-cultural atmos- 
phere of Gotham than to the plain and 
unvarnished air of Possum Hollow. The 
attitude of other Christian bodies to- 
wards the Episcopal Church is largely 
based on this myth and attitude. The 
sad part of the story is that many Epis- 
copalians are likewise confused. Let's 
wake up. 

There are many people who feel that 
the small town and rural missions are a 
"drain" upon established parishes and 
the total Church. There could be noth- 
ing farther from the truth. This writer 
made a survey of congregations in an- 



other Christian body in a metropolitan 
"conference" — the small congregations, 
for their size, were doing more than their 
share of the work in comparison to the 
large city and suburban churches. On a 
per capita basis per communicant, the 
giving of congregations with less than 
200 communicants was twice that of 
congregations of over 500 communicants. 

In our Church the comparitive per- 
capita giving per-communicant is fairly 
evenly divided between the mission 
churches and the parishes, happily. 

National statistics also affirm our 
thesis that the town and country church 
is not a liability to the whole of our 
Church. The mid-year 1950 report from 
"281" concerning the 1950 budget in- 
dicates that the provinces predominantly 
constituted of strictly urban and subur- 
ban dioceses have fallen miserably short 
on their "expectations." Looking more 
particularly at one specific diocese cov- 
ering a super-urban area, we discover 
that it could assume only 60% of its 
quota. The only provinces whose "ex- 
pectations" met their "quotas" were two: 
the Foreign Province and the Fcurth 
Province. The Fourth Province includes 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina. 
Both the province and our Diocese is def- 
initely "town and country" in nature. 

Persons who have followed pop- 
ular opinion and placed "town and 
country" work on the tail end of things 
will surely be surprised to find that 
truly the tails do wag the dog! Not only 
is our Church "town and country," but 
its strength is found in that fact. 

Beyond statistical measurement is the 
unending contributions which the small 
Church has made to the total Church. 
The small mission churches have been 
breeding places for the sense of 
fellowship so desperately needed in the 
whole of the Church. Our strong lay 
leadership has developed from the oppor- 
tunities given the laity in the mission 



church. The same can be said of the 
clergy; the thoroughness of our ministry 
has been made possible by small mis- 
sion churches who have accepted our 
young clergy to experiment, make mis- 
takes, and cut their "eye-teeth" before 
moving on to the more secure parishes. 
Most clergymen owe a great deal to the 
good people in their first cures who en- 
dured their ministrations with a true 
sense of humor and god-like patience. 

More devastating to the destruction 
of the myth of the rural church would 
be the testimony of history — the Gospel 
itself and the Church of the Ages. There 
is a natural appeal which the Gospel 
and the Church has to God's people in 
town and country. 

Xot inferring that the Gospel cannot 
meet the needs of all conditions of men 
never-the-less the grain of mustard seed, 
the fig tree, the grass of the field, the 
sower who went forth to sow are more 
at home in town and country than they 
they are on West 125th Street. The 
idiom of the Gospel is a rural one. 

More than that, the Body of Christ 
and its Liturgy evolved from the exper- 
ience of the village church and the 
country cure. There needs be no special 
"build-up" or apology made for the 
Prayerbook to rural folk — for even as 
the Gospel does, so does the Liturgy use 
of the language and symbol of their 
everyday experience. Where the Gospel 
and the Liturgy is heard in its fullness in 
the countryside without pretense and un- 
tried license, it draws all men unto itself. 

Having said all this, we must affirm 
that the health of the Church is de- 
pendent directly upon the condition of 
its rural missions. Throughout our his- 
tory, the town and country Church has 
been the source of our strength. Unless 
our polity, Prayerbook, and Gospel are 
changed, it will continue to be our 
strength. Thus, one at the same time we 
see our glory and our shame. As one 
American churchman has said, the 
Church "faces a period of steady decline 
in strength unless plans are inaugurated 
promptly for the revival of rural relig- 



ion and the reconstruction of the rural 
church throughout the nation." 

The Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina, and other similar dioceses, have a 
unique position in this whole regard. We 
aie of the rural Church, and strong 
enough to do something about it. In this 
regard, for a moment at least, we ought 
not to be modest about our own im- 
portance — for, as goes W.N.C., so goes 
the Church ! 

WE MUST supply leadership, both 
clergy and lay, to our existent mission 
churches, else that which we have will 
be lost. 

WE MUST open new fields. The Com- 
mittee on the State of the Church said 
in its 1950 annual report, "our 6600 bap- 
tized persons constitute only a drop in 
the bucket when compared to the nearly 
900,000 persons living within the boun- 
daries of our Diocese." 

WE MUST not only serve our own 
rural field, but we must become a factor 
in the National Church rural program. 
The Valle Crucis Rural Training School 
opens unlimited possibilities in this 
realm. It should be expanded. 

WE MUST help our Diocesan schools 
enter into the community life in a great- 
er measure than they are so nobly doing 
at the present time. Appalachian School 
and Patterson School are now rendering 
to the larger communities in which they 
serve immeasurable services, not only to 
souls, but to the soil. 

WE MLTST become more active, as 
churchmen and congregations, in the 
Community Development Programs and 
the County and State rural extension ser- 
vices. Rural reconstruction cannot be ac- 
complished alone by the church or alone 
by private and public agencies — it is a 
common task. 

FINALLY, WE MUST place our- 
selves more certainly under the disci- 
pline of the Liturgy, finding in what is 
everlastingly old, that which is eternally 
new . . . 

There is a myth concerning the rural 
Church. It must not persist . . . 



THE BISHOP'S SCHEDULE 



16: Diocesan Laymans Trainting School, St. Mary,s Asheville. 
17: A. M. Redeemer, Craggy, and St. Luke's, Chunns Cove. 

P. M. St. Paul's, Burke County, and St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows. 
17 to 22: Preaching Mission, Messiah, Murphy. 
24: A. M. St. Andrews, Canton; Confirmations, Calvary, Fletcher. 
26: Womans Auxiliary Executive Committee of Diocese, Hickory. 
27: Patterson School Board Meeting, Legerwood. 
29: Canterbury Club, W.C.T.C., Culowhee. 
Confirmations, Ascension, Hickory. 
St. Luke's Society, Sewanee, Tenn. 
Diocesan Executive Council, Diocesan Office. 
Laymans Conference, Asheville area, Asheville. 
6: Laymans Conference, Morganton area. Hickory. 
8: Confirmations, Grace, Morganton. 
10 & 11 :Provincial Synod, Tampa, Florida. 
1 1 : Address Woman's Auxiliary of Synod, Tampa. 
15: Confirmations, St. Johns, Marion. 
October 20-27: College of Preachers, Washington, D. C. 



September 
September 

September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
October 1 
October 3 
October 5 



October 
October 
October 
October 
October 



LAYMEN AT WORK 



A. B. Stoney 

Diocesan Laymens Committee, 

Morganton 

The Laymen's Training Program be- 
gins in earnest on September 8-10, when 
thirty leading Laymen of the Church 
gather at Seabury House to be trained 
as instructors of Diocesan groups who 
will in turn take the story of the activ- 
ities of the Church in the Diocese and 
in the Nation to every congregation in 
America. 

Western North Carolina Laymen are 
particularly honored in that one of our 
brilliant Laymen, Cary Page of Tryon, 
has been chosen as one of the select 
thirty to gather at Seabury House. 
Gary's training schedule takes him to 
such widely separated places as Roa- 
noke, Va., Alexandria, La., and Myrtle 
Beach, S. C. 

Our Trainees gather at Asheville on 
September 16th, to be instructed by 
William M. Dorr of Louisville, Ky. Dur- 
ing the early fall these trained Laymen 
will make short presentations to all our 
congregations using modern techniques 



of salesmanship. 

It is a great program and one which 
should make us all proud of our part in 
it and proud of our Bishop and our peo- 
ple who are determined to keep step 
with the onward marching Christian 
soldiers of the Episcopal Church. 

Area meetings are under the leader- 
ship of our two Area Chairmen, Ed 
Hartshorn, and Ralph Todd and sched- 
uled as follows: 

October 5 — Asheville Area, at Ashe- 
ville. 

October 6 — Morganton Area, at Hick- 
ory. 

After this has been done, the next 
great undertaking of our Laymen is the 
Men's Advent Corporate Communion 
on December 3rd, the first Sunday in 
Advent. 

Let us have such an outpouring of 
our men and boys for the Area meet- 
ings and the Corporate Communion that 
for sheer numbers participating we will 
shake the foundations of our Churches 
and leave all our people agog at the 
things Laymen can do if they try. 



YOUTH NEWS 



Mary Aston Leavell, Editor 
301 S. King St., Morganton 

DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 

Our Diocesan camp was held July 
2-8 at Patterson School. There were 
about forty-five campers this year. The 
new gym was a great addition to the 
camp. We used the basketball court for 
various games and due to rain, we had 
to have most of our night programs 
there. We also used the wonderfully 
cool gym basement for movies one of 
which was "The King of Kings." The 
Rev. Robert J. McCloskey was our chap- 
lain. He gave us some very inspiring 
talks using a popular song as the theme 
each evening. 

Square dancing was enjoyed almost 
every night with the expert help of Earl 
Jones, Calvary, Fletcher, who called. 
The Patterson Camp String Band was 
under the able direction of the Rever- 
end Maestro C. Leavell; the other mem- 
ber of the orchestra was David Reed. 
Added to the repertory of traditional 



stories which always include C. LevelPs 
"Peezelltree" and M. Jenkin's ghost 
story, was a sad, sad account of R. 
McCloskey's friend, Joe Doaks who was 
blown to bits by cheap dynamite. 

The faculty was composed of The Rev. 
G. M. Jenkins, Director, The Rev. Rhett 
Winters, The Rev. Charles G. Leavell 
Vice Director, Miss Aline Cronshey and 
Bishop Henry. Each of us took two 
courses, of which there were six — The 
Mission of the Church, Church Symbol- 
ism, Holy Scriptures, How To Know the 
Will of God for Me, Parables and Their 
Lessons for Today, and Program Plan- 
ning. 

We all took turns at dish washing, 
sweeping, waiting tables, and planning 
for the night program. Only one camp- 
fire was held, that being the last night 
of camp. After a strenous week, every- 
one was pretty tired, but we all had a 
wonderful time and are looking forward 
to an even bigger and better camp next 
year. 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS 



On July 2, CHANCELLOR MILL- 
FORD OF LINCOLN CATHEDRAL, 

England, was preacher for the day at 
Trinity Church, Asheville. Chancellor 
Millford is spending the summer in 
America and is to be teaching the sec- 
ond semester of the summer term at the 
LIniversity of North Carolina. Born in 
1895, he was educated at Oxford and at 
Cambridge. He has been a distinguished 
Churchman in England, having spent 
time in India and other places and he is 
considered among the leading British 
thinkers. His interest goes from music 
to mathematics to New Testament The- 
ology. Among other engagements in this 
country he is preaching at Duke Univer- 
sity, Columbia University, as well as 
several leading conferences. 

It should be of interest to everyone to 



know that Chancellor Millford is the 
legal custodian of the Magna Carta, the 
English Bill of Rights. This great charter 
was kept in this country during the war 
at Ft. Knox, along with our own Decla- 
ration of Independence. 

The woman's Auxiliary of St. Mary's 
Church, Asheville, brought DEACON- 
ESS MADELAINE DUNLAP to Ashe- 
ville on July 12 to speak concerning the 
work she is doing in a rural mission hos- 
pital in S. W. Virginia. Women from the 
other Asheville churches attended the 
meeting which gave recognition to the 
important work which the deaconesses 
of the Church are carrying on. 

The mid-year report of RECEIPTS 
TO SEWANEE from our Diocese 
showed that a total of #388.97 was re- 
ceived to July 1. Of this amount, $305.- 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS (Continued) 



77 were receipts from Theological Edu- 
cation Sunday offerings. 

Trinity Parish has lost, in the death of 
DeWITT HUDSON CLARK, one of its 
most faithful and valued members. For 
all the years that he was here in this 
Parish there was never a time when he 
was not faithful to the many responsibil- 
ities to which he was called. He was ac- 
tive in every way for the good of the 
Parish. As a teacher in the Sunday 
School, as one of the moving spirits in 
the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, and as 
a Vestryman, he always manifested a 
great spirit of love for the Church and 
beyond all these things his ability to 
create deepened Christian fellowship 
have made great contributions to this 
parish life. — Trinity Church Bulletin. 

The CHORAL GROUP FROM 
TRANSYLVANIA Music Camp, Bre- 
vard, with Chamber Orchestra accom- 
paniment rendered a service of Music 
•it All Soul's, Biltmore, on August 2. Dur- 
ing the same week, the All Souls' Choir 
sang Bach's Cantata #6, "Bide With 
Us." 

World-wide Christian leaders such as 
TOYIKO KAGAWA and MARTIN 
NIEMOLLER received wide audiences 
in this area this summer. Many Church- 
men had the opportunity to hear them 
at Montreat and Junaluska. All Soul's, 
Biltmore, had the great opportunity of 
hearing Niernoller preach from the All 
Soul's pulpit. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of Trinity, 
Asheville, sponsored a CHAMBER MU- 
SIC CONCERT in the Parish Hall on 
August 22. It was offered to support the 
interest in pure musical art which is ex- 
pressed in the string quartet. The pro- 
ceeds will no doubt help the busy pro- 
gram of the Trinity Auxiliary. 

The response to the All Soul's Lec- 
tures on Church History have showed 
n wide interest in a more complete un- 
derstanding of the Church's History. Fr. 
Webbe, repeated his lecture on "THE 



EARLY CENTURIES" to the Men's 
Club of Trinity Church on August 30. 

The Rev. Charles L. McGavern acted 
as locum tenens at HOLY CROSS, 
1 RYON, during August. The Rev. New- 
ton Middleton, D.D., will return in the 
same capacity during September. 

THE REV. WILLIAM T. CAPERS, 
although improved in health during the 
past weeks, finds that his present physi- 
cal condition will not allow his returning 
to full-time work on September 1st as 
he had hoped. The Vestry has extended 
his leave of absence to January 1, 1951. 
Mr. Capers' many friends trust that the 
Fall months will give him greater 
strength. 

ROBERT J. McCLOSKEY was or- 
dained to the Diaconate on July 11, 1950 
at St. Andrews Church, Canton. The 
Rev. John Tuton was presenter; the 
Rev. Mark Jenkins, preacher; the Rev. 
Edgar Goold, Epistler; the Rev. Isaac 
Northup was the Litanist. The guests 
at the ordination were served a fine 
chicken dinner in the church school 
rooms after the ceremony. Mr. McClos- 
key served as resident lay reader to St. 
Andrews from June 1949. Prior to that 
time he was in the ministry of the Meth- 
odist Church. 

Miss Lucy Fletcher, BIRTHDAY 
THANK OFFERING secretary, reports 
in August that the response to the re- 
cent thank offering appeal has brought 
total receipts to $60.63 from 13 missions 
and parishes. Churches are urged to con- 
sider this means of missionary activity 
and education. 

St. Paul's, Edneyville, held their an- 
nual "REVIVAL SERVICES" in Aug- 
ust under the leadership of Miss Aline 
Cronshey and the Rev. G. Mark Jenk- 
ins, priest-in-charge. The Rev. Robert J. 
McCloskey was the preacher from Au- 
gust 13-19. A youth rally was held on 
the 16th; rite of Baptism on the 19th. 
The Bishop of the Diocese confirmed 14 
candidates on Sundav the 20th. 



8 



THE EPISCOPAL HOUR IS ON THE AIR 



"The Episcopal Hour!" At precisely 
8:30 EST (7:30 CST) on Sunday morn- 
ing, October 1, these words will ring out 
over a network of 140 radio stations cov- 
ering the entire South and Southwest, 
and The Episcopal Hour radio program 
for 1950 will have become an actuality. 
It is conservately estimated that one 
million listeners will hear these words 
and the 30 minute service which will 
follow, including an address by Bishop 
Louttit of South Florida, who will be 
the preacher for the first program. The 
Episcopal Hour will continue each Sun- 
day morning at the same time and over 
the same stations during October, No- 
vember and December. 

Bishop Walker of Atlanta, chairman 
of the Radio Committee of the Fourth 
Province, refers to this project as a 
''venture in faith on the part of a few 
of us.." The truth is that for months it 
did not look as though The Episcopal 
Hour would actually materialize. Radio 
programs are expensive, even though the 
time on the air for this broadcast is 
generously contributed by the radio sta- 
tions. Also, the General Convention de- 
clined financial support, stating that this 
was a project of those Provinces covered 
by the network. Bishop Walker, believ- 
ing that everything possible should be 
done before losing this valuable oppor- 
tunity of evangelism, turned to the Bish- 
ops in whose Dioceses the program will 
be heard for financial support. At the 
same time he made The Episcopal Hour 
one of the objectives in the One World 
in Christ campaign in the Diocese of 
Atlanta. All of the Dioceses expressed 
interest. The Dioceses of Tennessee, 
South Florida, Georgia, Virginia, East 
Carolina, Upper South Carolina, West 
Texas and Southern Virginia, promised 
financial support. This assurance, to- 
gether with the substantial sum allocated 
by the Diocese of Atlanta from the One 
World in Christ funds, was sufficient to 
begin operations; but, as it were, on a 
shoestring. 



Every service connected with produc- 
ing The Episcopal Hour for 1950 that 
did not require a professional radio 
technician has been rendered by volun- 
teers. The music, which for a 13 week 
series usually costs around $2,000, has 
been contributed by the choirs of the 
Cathedral of St. Philip, St. Luke's, All 
Saints' Churches, Atlanta, and St. 
James,, Marietta. Publicity, promotion, 
etc., has been done in Bishop Walker's 
office at no charge to the slender Epis- 
copal Hour funds. The Bishops who 
contributed the sermons for the 14 week- 
ly programs travelled to Atlanta, where 
the transcriptions are made, at their own 
expense. The chairman of the Radio 
Sub-Committee of the Advisory Board of 
the Diocese of Atlanta had the pleasant 
•"ask of entertaining the visiting Bishops. 

Bishop Walker is serving as the active 
head, and in addition to rallying finan- 
cial support, making all plans and decis- 
ions, has arranged for the speakers, for 
the music, and other necessary items to 
)ut The Episcopal Hour on the air. 

The existing network of the Southern 
Religious Radio Conference, through 
vvhose facilities The Episcopal Hour will 
be broadcast, carries the program into 
9 states, including four Provinces (3, 
4, 6, 7) and 31 Dioceses; and it is pos- 
sible to add stations and thus extend 
his coverage. 

Bishop Henry of Western North Car- 
olina, who is Chairman of Promotion for 
the Fourth Province, and Bishop Walk- 
er plan to lay this whole matter before 
the Provincial Synod of the Fourth 
Province when it meets in October with 
the hope that The Episcopal Hour will 
be permanently provided for in the bud- 
get. Furthermore, since the coverage 
extends beyond the confines of the 
Fourth Province, an effort will be made 
to get the other Provinces geographical- 
ly involved to take the same action. Al- 
leady interest has been expressed and 
financial contributions have been made 
outside the Fourth Province through the 



Diocese of Virginia, Southern Virginia 
and West Texas which are in the Third 
and Seventh Provinces. If these efforts 
are successful The Episcopal Hour will 
become a permanent feature of the 
Church's influence in this portion of 
the country. 

The speakers for the five Sunday 
mornings in October will be: 

The Rt. Rev. Henry I. Louttit, Bishop 
of South Floroida — October 1, 

The Rt. Rev. Edmund P. Danbridge, 
Bishop of Tennessee — October 8, 

The Rt. Rev, Thomas H. Wright, 
Bishop of East Carolina — October 15, 



The Rt. Rev. M. George Henry, Bish- 
op of Western North Carolina — Oct. 22, 

The Rt. Rev. Randolph R. Clairborne, 
Suffragan Bishop of Alamaba — Oct. 29. 

LISTEN TO THE EPISCOPAL 
HOLIR each Sunday morning at 8:30 
EST and 7:30 CST over the following 
stations in your vicinity! 

WWNC ASHEVILLE 

WGNC GASTONIA 

WHKY HICKORY 

WMNC MORGANTON 

WHCC WAYNESVILLE 



THE NATIONAL COUNCIL'S 
TRAINING PROGRAM FOR LAY- 
MEN is shaping up so that practically 
final details have meen mailed to 
the dioceses. It is believed that 80 dio- 
ceses and missionary districts, including 
Honolulu and Alaska, will make use of 
this new method of presenting the 
Church's program to the people of the 
Church in preparation for the Every 
Member Canvass. The 30 specially 
chosen laymen who will train 2,300 
other laymen receive a special course of 
instruction at Seabury House Septem- 
ber 8, 9, 10, with Robert D. Jordan, di- 
rector of promotion, as instructor, the 
Rev. Arnold M. Lewis, as official host, 
and the Rev. Newell D. Lindner as chap- 
lain. The Presiding Bishop and Bishop 
John B. Bentley will have parts in the 
program. 

The 30 men who will, after receiving 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



their own training, conduct training in- 
stitutes in all parts of the country, are 
picked men from all walks of life, rep- 
resentitives of the finest and most able 
laymen of the Church. They include 
doctors, lawyers, business men, army and 
navy officers, college presidents. They 
consider themselves highly honored in 
being chosen from the whole manpower 
of the Church for this unique service. 

Never before in the history of the 
Church have 2,300 intensively trained 
laymen undertaken to carry the mes- 
sage of the Church's work throughout 
the world directly to the people of the 
Church. These men will address parish 
meetings now being set up all over the 
country, using modern techniques to 
make the story they tell interesting and 
inspiring. 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville. N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 1 1 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A.M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
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SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

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Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 
An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Rel igious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
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—indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 





VOL. XXI 



OCTOBER, 1950 



NO. 1 




The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



dtjttrrljman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, SOc a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 

Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



THE EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 

The Every Member Canvass — always 
a basically important activity in every 
parish and mission — is more important 
this year than ever. For, this year, the 
Church is asking all of us to work and 
pray and give more than ever toward 
the extension of the Kingdom of God, 
man's only hope. In the face of the 
stark situation prevailing throughout the 
world, the Church has committed itself 
to presenting the saving Gospel of Christ 
with the greatest possible force, at every 
point at home and abroad. 

But when God asks, He also enables. 
And so God's Church, having asked more 
consecrated giving of us all this year, 
has set up an enabling program. Your 
parish or mission has available for this 
year's Canvass a wealth of cooperation 
that has never before been obtainable. 

Trained helpers are available to you. 
Last month a group of laymen chosen 
from all over the United States — includ- 
ing Mr. Cary Page from our own dio- 



cese — met at Seabury House to be given 
an intensive course in the Church's 
worldwide work. These men then went 
to every diocese of the Church, to pass 
their training on to other laymen. In 
our own diocese, fifteen men are now 
fully prepared to help our parishes and 
missions with the Canvass. 

They will make carefully selected ma- 
terial available to you. When the trained 
layman meets with your people, he will 
speak officially about the work our Na- 
tional Church is doing in strengthening 
its program of Christian Education and 
Christian Social Action at home and 
abroad. He will then, through a record- 
ing, let you hear directly from a Bishop 
active in the domestic field, and from an- 
other Bishop active in the foreign field. 
Finally, you will hear our own Bishop's 
voice speaking of the Church's work 
right here in Western North Carolina, 
as colored slides depicting that work are 
thrown on a screen before you. In short 
a conducted tour of the Church's work 
from near at hand to the ends of the 
world is ready for your use. And in ad- 
dition to this general information that 
will be of great help and interest to your 
whole congregation, the layman is pre- 
pared to meet with your own canvassers, 
with more material and ideas to help 
them in their work. 

How r does the local parish or mission 
best cooperate with this program? First, 
by selecting the day and time when it is 
most convenient for the congregation to 
gather together for this presentation. A 
parish dinner would be an excellent oc- 
casion. And second, by carefully follow- 
ing up, through a diligent carrying out 
of the usual Canvass methods, the in- 
spiration that will then have been given. 

"God our Father, Who provid- 
est for thy children in advance of 
their needs, bless the work of our 
Every Member Canvass, and grant 
us all to share in it with glad and 
willing hearts for the sake of thy 
Kingdom, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord." 

— G. D. W. 



LIBERTY NOT LICENSE 

We are happy that the Church does 
not speak precisely to us concerning 
what we shall eat, or what we shall 
drink, or the clothes wherewithal we 
shall be clothed. There are some Chris- 
tian bodies that give their constituents 
particular direction to not indulge in 
rich foods, liquors, cigarettes, the theatre, 
and mink coats. We live in enlightenment, 
so we say; we do not see life's luxuries 
as sins in themselves. However there is 
a grave danger we face of not seeing the 
distinction between liberty and license. 
The danger in believing that just be- 
cause the Church does not speak to us 
particularly about our habits that it does 
not speak to us at all. 

One cannot help but pass judgment 
upon our churchmanship insofar as it 
concerns our stewardship of the world's 
goods. The Every Member Canvass is 
on — and we are all examining that por- 
tion of our substance we shall give to 
Christ and His Church. We are at lib- 
erty to give what we can — we are not at 
liberty to give as little as we can, or 



even to give a calculated share of a pro- 
posed budget. There's a line between lib- 
erty and license. Luxury items loom to 
huge proportions in our regular family 
budgets — there is a temptation to let 
them slide into the category of necessi- 
ties. 

When the tallies are in and the bud- 
gets secured at the close of the Canvass, 
a close tabulation will reveal that we are 
spending more on luxuries than we are 
on the Church of Christ! Dollar for 
dollar, the Church is actually asking you 
to give less to it than you are to the lux- 
uries you enjoy — not the necessities, the 
luxuries! If that is so, and it is, we are 
not much better off than the misguided 
souls who look upon luxuries as sins. 

There is a realm of choice we have in 
determining what portion of our goods 
go to the Church and its mission. Let us 
use our liberty to make such decision; 
let us cease giving first-class allegiance 
to items of second-class distinction. The 
Church does not speak precisely to us 
concerning our wealth — but the Church 
does speak to us . . . 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 
PENLAND, N. C. 

Appalachian School is an official in- 
stitution of this Diocese — it is "of", 
"for", and "by" all of us. Many times 
in our efforts to extend the realm of 
the Church, we lose sight of the Church 
close at home. Perhaps most of us know 
very little about one of our "official" 
schools — Appalachian School. 

It is unique in many respects: First, 
it is the only school of the Church in the 
South whose program is directed to 
younger children. Grades 1 through 6 
make up the classes; children of ages 
6 through 12 make up the "student 
body". It is therefore unique in that it 
is a primary boarding and day school 
for little boys and girls. Second, the stu- 
dent body is not made up of "typical" 
boarding school pupils whose parents 
can afford for them such education, rath- 
er, the vast majority of homes from 
which the children come are broken 



homes or marginal income homes.. Usu- 
ally children from such homes would be 
thrown into public agency care; Appa- 
lachian School's modest rates allow the 
marginal-income home to send their 
children to a good church school. 

Even though the tuition rates are very 
modest, the school must depend upon 
the tuition as the primary source of in- 
come. Thus one of its unique advantages 
tends to become a disadvantage, for it 
is almost impossible to run a school on 
income from tuition, unless the tuition 
is very high. To raise tuitions to the point 
where they would carry fiscal needs 
would be to turn away boys and girls 
and defeat the purpose of the school. 

Even with a level tuition rate, current 
economic instability has reduced this 
year's paying students — there is room 
for 15 more at this writing! 

Capital improvements and equipment 

(Continued On Page 16) 



3 



THE BISHOP'S PAGE 



October 22: Lincolnton, St. Luke's, Our Savior, and St. Cyprian's 

October 23-27: Boone, ASTC, Religious Emphasis Week Addresses 

October 29: Redeemer, Shelby; St. Andrew's, Bessemer City 

November 2, 3, 5, 8, 9: District Meetings, Woman's Auxiliary 

November 12: Asheville School, Trinity, and St. Matthias, Asheville 

November 13: Executive Board 

November 14: Kanuga Board of Managers 

November 15: Convocation of Morganton 

November 16: Appalachian School Board 

November 19: St. Andrews, Canton; Grace, Waynesville 

Summer vacations are behind us. We hope that they were of such a nature 
that all of us feel refreshed and eager to undertake new responsibilities. In looking 
forward to the Fall and Winter, our life in the Church should be fully considered in 
the plans. There are certain definite areas of Church activity in which we are par- 
ticularly conscious of in the Fall. There is the Sunday School; opened with new 
plans and enthusiasm. Should I not be one of the teachers or helpers in this venture? 

There is the Every Member Canvass. Should I not make an especial effort to 
inform myself about the work of the Church, and see to it that others are likewise 
informed? Many will be asked to help with the Canvass; should I not willingly 
accept my responsibility? Should I not give to the program of the Church even as 
God has given to me? With the regular routine being set up that will govern my life 
during the coming months, should I not allot some time for regular study and prayer; 
that I may be a better Churchman, strengthened by God, and willing to do my 
utmost for the Church of Jesus Christ? 

At our Diocesan Convention held in Hickory this Spring, I set as a goal an 
increase in the number to be confirmed. There are five thousand communicants in 
this diocese. Certainly, a goal of five hundred persons a year brought to confirma- 
mation is not too high a goal. 

That means that in each congregation there should be presented for confirma- 
tion about ten percent of the communicant strength. 

It is the bounded duty of every Church Member ''to work for the spread of 
Christ's Kingdom." The main work in the spread of His Kingdom is the personal 
evangelism of each communicant. Is it too much to expect that ten percent of each 
congregation can reach one person a year? I feel that is low, but it is a beginning. 

It is the congregation's responsibility, as much as the minister's responsibility, 
to reach people and bring them into the Fellowship of the Church. The vitality and 
concern of a congregation for the spread of The Church is indicated by the number 
confirmed each year. I expect every communicant in the diocese of Western North 
Carolina to feel a concern for, and act upon, his or her obligation to bring persons 
to confirmation. 



The diocesan Budget is increased for the year 1951. This budget was adopted 
by you through your delegates to the Diocesan Convention held in Hickory, May 
1950. The increase is considerable, and it is reflected in the increase in the amount 
asked for each parish and mission of the diocese. This in turn, means that the indi- 
vidual of the parish and mission is asked to make an increase in the support of the 
missionary work of the Church. 

We are enlarging our work as fast as possible. We are placing clergymen in 



NEW MANAGER FOR KANUGA 

The Right Reverend M. George Hen- 
ry, Bishop of Western North Carolina 
and President of Kanuga Conferences, 
has announced the appointment of Mr. 
Willard P. Verduin as Business Manager 
for Kanuga Conferences. Mr. Verduin 
assumes the duties of the Superinten- 
dent, the Reverend John A. Pickney and 
cf the Property Manager, Mr. Rufus 
Honeycutt. Mr. Pickney will now be able 
to give his full time to his Parish, St. 
James, in Greenville, South Carolina; 
Mr. Huneycutt, who has worked at 
Kanuga for about forty years, will con- 
tinue on a part time basis but without 
the heavy responsibility he has carried 
in recent years. 

Mr. Verduin comes to Kanuga from 
Georgetown, South Carolina, where he 
was employed by West Virginia Pulp 
and Paper Company in land manage- 
ment work. Although a Forester with 
considerable experience in property man- 
agement, his interests during recent 
years have been strongly toward young 
people's work. This fortunate combina- 
tion will serve well in managing the 1200 
acres of woodlands on the Kanuga prop- 
erty and the 1200 young people who at- 
tend the activities at Kanuga each sum- 
mer. Mr. Verduin is married and has a 
six year old daughter, Terry. The Ver- 
duins will be year round residents at 
Kanuga and they cordially invite all 
friends of Kanuga to drop by to see 
them at any time of the year. 

Mr. Pickney's association with Kanu- 
ga has been a long one, as he first came 
to the Conference Center in an official 
capacity in 1932, when he was made a 
member of the Faculty of the Young 
People's Conference. He was at that time 



Rector of the Episcopal Church in Try- 
en, North Carolina. Subsequent changes 
in Charleston, Clemson and Greenville, 
South Carolina still kept him in close 
contact with Kanuga activities, with 
which he became even more closely asso- 
ciated when he took over the director- 
ship of the Young Peoples' Conference 
in 1938 and was later asked by the late 
Bishop Kirkman G. Finlay to assume 
responsibility of both Young Peoples' 
and Junior Camp periods. He headed 
up these conferences for some years, as- 
suming more responsibility following' 
the death of Bishop Finlay in 1938, and 
the resignation of the Reverend Rufus 
Morgan who had been business manager 
and general all-round aid to Bishop Fin- 
lay. In 1943 the management of Kanuga 
was divided among three people, with 
Mr. Pickney being elected Supervisor, 
Mr. F. D. McLean becoming Treasurer, 
and Mr. Rufus Huneycutt being made 
Property Manager. In 1947 Mr. Pick- 
ney's title was changed to Superinten- 
dent and his duties became even more 
general. That arrangement has held un- 
til this year when the need for a full 
time resident Business Manager was 
recognized and Mr. Verduin was elected 
to take this responsibility. It is with 
deep regret that his many friends see Mr. 
Pickney give up the responsibilities he 
has so ably held. 

THE EDITOR would appreciate hav- 
ing forwarded to him any extra copies 
of THE HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN tot 
June 1950. Perhaps some Churches 
receiving bundles of the H. C. may 
have extra copies of that month's is- 
sue? 



vacant churches as fast as possible. W T e are entering new areas as the opportunity 
presents itself, and as we have means. We should always obey the commands of our 
Lord to "go to all peoples." As we obey that command, it will require self-sacrifice 
on the part of all of us. 

The Program of the diocese as adopted in our convention will require the par- 
ticipation of everyone in the diocese. I expect every communicant of the diocese to 
give, through a pledge, his whole-hearted support in enlarging the work of Our 
Lord. 



THE LATE ARCHBISHOP OF 
CANTERBURY ON WAR. 

ON THE USE OF FORCE. "But as 
the fact that we are right now does not 
obliterate our past sin, so our past sin 
in no way alters the fact that we are 
right now. No positive good can be done 
by force; that is true. But evil can be 
checked and held back by force, and 
it is precisely this that we may be called 
upon to use. If it be so, let us do it in 
calm but unshakable resolution, trying, 
in spite of all the agony, to bear no ill- 
will to those whom we must resist, seek- 
ing to inflict no more suffering than is 
inevitably involved in the resistance that 
we must offer, bearing with patient, 
courage and suffering that comes to our- 
selves. And while we do our utmost to 
secure the triumph of right as it has been 
given us to see the right, let us steadily 
look beyond the conflict to the restora- 
tion of peace, and dedicate ourselves to 
the creation of a world-order which shall 
be fair to the generations yet unborn." 
—William Temple, Aug. 1939 

ON WARTIME PRAYER. "I am 

afraid I distress you by the fact that 



the forms of prayer which I draw up do 
not contain direct prayers for victory. I 
have always felt that it is wiser to avoid 
this, and have publicly stated that it 
ought to be avoided. I am of course 
prepared to say . . . 'Grant us victory if 
it be Thy Will'; but I am sure that clause 
ought to be added in such a case, even 
though it governs all our praying at all 
times. 

"But I have tried always to draw up 
prayers which do not range us over 
against any of our fellow-Christians in 
Germany or elsewhere, because it seems 
to me that the primary concern is pray- 
er — and I mean 'primary' quite serious- 
ly — must be the approach to the Father 
of all men with recognition that all His 
other children have the same right of 
approach, and that if we pray as our 
Lord taught us, we. are never praying 
against each other, because we are al- 
ways praying not that we want shall 
be done, but that what God wants shall 
be done, and that we may be used for 
doing it." — William Temple, Letter to 
the Archbishop of York, February, 1944. 

(Copied from HOLY CROSS COUR- 
IER, Tryon, N. C, Sept. 3, 1950) 



PRAYER FOR THE U. N. 

Almighty God, from whom all thoughts of truth and peace 
proceed; Guide, we pray thee, with thy strong and peaceful wisdom, 
those who take counsel for the nations of the earth in the United 
Nations Organization. And that we may worthily support them, 
deliver all thy people from selfishness and false ambitions. Grant 
that we may prepare our minds through study, our hearts through 
compassion, and our souls through praver and sacrament for a new 
world in which justice shall be assured to all and in which peace 
shall be enduring, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 
(Approved by the Bishop for use in the churches of this Diocese.) 



FOR THE FAMILY OF NATIONS 

Almighty God, our heavenly Father, guide, we beseech Thee, 
the Nations of the world into the way of justice and truth, and 
establish among them that peace which is the fruit of righteousness, 
that they may become the Kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus 
Christ. Amen. 

{Book of Common Prayer, Page 44. Written for the 1928 Prayer- 
book by Bishop Parsons, the Collect was based on James 3: 18 and 
Revelations 11:15) 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Lanthe Rush Campbell 
STUDY 

Mrs. Haden. our secretary of Chris- 
tian Education, asked that all the 
branches send their planned programs 
for the year to her. She wishes to con- 
gratulate the Auxiliary of St. Philips, 
Brevard for being the first to send her 
their plans. If you haven't sent Mrs. 
Haden your program, please do so as 
soon as possible. 

SUPPLY 

Mrs. Menzies, our supply secretary, 
tells us that we can't send medical sup- 
plies to China, but we can send money — 
for medical supplies are still available 
there. She has sent $50 to St. James' 
Hospital, Anking, China, $20 for the 
Supply Secretary Gift Fund. 

Our box goes to St. Margaret's Con- 
vent, Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. In this 
mission there are 1000 men, 1000 wom- 
en, and 3000 children. Miss Stabler, our 
National Secretary wrote me that Mrs. 
Sheldon Leavitt of Asheville met Sister 
Joan Margaret here on furlough from 
the work in Haiti, so I wrote Mrs. 
Leavitt for some information — and her 
reply is as follows: 

"My Dear Mrs. Menzies, 

Sister Joan Margaret is in charge 
of the work for afflicted children in Port- 
Au-Prince. The government of Haiti does 
nothing for them, and their parents put 
them out to starve. The first child they 
took was a blind waif found on the 
street. Next, a deaf child was brought 
to them and then more and more, blind, 
deaf, and below normal from malnutri- 
tion. As the children grew it became nec- 
essary to give them some kind of school- 
ing, and so finally there has grown up a 
a regular school for these abnormal chil- 
dren and for well problem children sent 
to them from regular schools. Sister Joan 
has with her now in the States a blind 
child who is having the transplanting of 
the cornea in the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, and a deaf child who is being 
fitted with a hearing aid. 



"So far these children are too young to 
take back to their own kind, but she is 
going to teach them to operate a braille 
typewriter so that they can learn to help. 
Other girls who can take no book learn- 
ing, they are teaching to do fine sewing. 
Two girls who have married native 
priests they have taught the things that 
they can use in country missions, first 
aid, cooking, Sunday School teaching, 
sewing, etc. 

"How I wish your letter had come a 
week ago! Sister Joan spoke at Trinity 
Church and showed colored slides on 
August 31st to the various parishes and 
missions near Asheville. 

"Sister Joan says her next leave will be 
three years from now, and she will take 
it right after Easter. I am hoping the 
Bishop and the clergy who met her here, 
and some of the women will arrange a 
regular tour for her around the Diocese. 
She is going this month to Ohio and go 
all around with the Bishop there. She is 
perfectly charming and we all fell in love 
with her. 

Diocesan Supply Secretary 
Mary S. Menzies" 

LENOIR— Mrs. W. J. Gordon spoke 
to the Women of St. James', Lenoir at 
their opening Fall meeting. 

The Lenoir Auxiliary has been divided 
into two Chapters. Mr. J. R. Todd is 
chairman of one chapter and Mrs. Bos- 
ton M. Lackey is chairman of one. One 
group meets in the afternoon and one in 
the evening. 

BLOWING ROCK— Mrs. Smoot en- 
tertained at a delightful Silver Tea this 
summer at her attractive Blowing Rock 
home. She was assisted by the Women's 
Auxiliary of Boone. Proceeds from the 
tea went to the Blowing Rock-Boone 
Woman's Auxiliary. 

THE DISTRICT MEETINGS are 
being planned during the period from 
November 2nd through 9th. Check with 
your local officers to determine where 
your meeting will be held, and attend. 



YOUTH NEWS 



Mary Aston Leavell 
THE ALL YOUTH CONVENTION 
OF THE PROVINCE OF SEWANEE 

was held the week of August 28 — Sep- 
tember 2 at Monteagle, Tennessee. It 
was a wonderful week of work, planning, 
and fellowship under the leadership of 
The Rev. Harry Tisdale and Philip 
Porcher, Provincial Youth Commission 
Chairman. 

Each morning, following Holy Com- 
munion and breakfast, lectures were giv- 
en by Lindley Hartwell, Chairman of 
the National Youth Commission, dis- 
cussing the purposes and ideals of 
U.M.C.Y. and PLAN. Lectures were 
ba.sed on the three main topics of this 
year's PLAN: "One Faith," "One Body" 
and "One Fellowship." Following the lec- 
tures the convention divided into four 
discussion groups, each led by a commis- 
sion member. Then the findings of the 
groups were reported to the entire con- 
vention. In the afternoons, workshops 
were held on Program Planning. Flying 
Squadrons, Finance, and the Purpose of 
a Meeting and How to Conduct It. At 
the evening services Father Wra. Turk- 
ington of St. Andrew's School gave talks 
on the Holy Communion. 

Our Diocese was represented by Clara 
Kate Boggs, Vice-Pres. of our Young 
Churchmen, Mary Aston Leavell, and 
through noon of the 30th, The Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, Chairman of the Dio- 
cesan Youth Commission. David Reid, 
President of the Youth Churchmen was 
to have gone, but he came down with 
flu at the last minute. 

Friday, Sept. 1, was devoted to busi- 
ness. Reports were given by all P.Y.C. 
officers and committee chairmen, resolu- 
tions were read and adopted, some 
changes were made in the Constitution, 
and new officers of the Province were 
elected. Reelected as Chairman was 
Philip Porcher from Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 
Billy Yon of the Diocese of Atlanta was 
elected Vice-Chairman and Dot Danach 
of the Diocese of Miss., Secretary. The 



new officers were also elected to repre- 
sent our Province on the National Youth 
Commission. 

THE DIOCESAN YOUTH CON- 
VENTION which was scheduled to meet 
?t Grace, Morganton, later in the Fall, 
was moved forward to October 6 and 7 
in order to hold the sessions while Mr. 
Leavell was still in residence there. His 
resignation as Rector is effective Octo- 
ber 15. Mr. Leavell has been an impor- 
tant guide in the Youth Work in our Di- 
ocese. David Reid, president of the Dio- 
cesan Young People, has outlined a 
fine program for the annual conven- 
tion. — Ed. 

All the Youth groups in the parishes 
and missions of ASHEVILLE AND 
ENVIRONS, and Calvary, Fletcher, 
have formed a group for the purpose of 
joint programs. To plan these get-to- 
gether meetings the officers of the in- 
dividual groups formed a "Planning 
Council." About once each month a joint 
meeting is planned. All these have been 
most successful. An evening service and 
picnic, host, St. Mary's; supper and 
t£-lk by our Bishop, host, Trinity; square 
dance and watermelon party, host, Cal- 
vary. It is hoped that this type of local 
cooperation among parish and mission 
youth will spread over the whole Dio- 
cese. 

ST. MARY'S, ASHEVILLE, YPSL 
has gathered together enough money to 
enable purchase of a badly needed new 
carpet for the Church sanctuary. Notices 
now and again in our Youth News indi- 
cate that the St. Mary's group is quite 
active; they meet on Sundays at 7 P. M. 

CALVARY, FLETCHER, YOUNG 
CHURCHMAN'S CLUB is now back to 
full strength again after the summer 
:amps. About a dozen of our boys and 
girls attended one of our camps, Kanuga 
ir Patterson; and one strayed to Camp 
St. Christopher in South Carolina. The 
Young Churchman's Club has given two 
parties recently. On September 1st they 
lad a square dance with refreshments 



8 



for all those going away to school and 
college, and also four going into the 
Armed Forces. On September 22nd they 
had another square dance and supper to 
welcome all the new members coming in 
by Confirmation on September 24th. 
About thirty boys and girls were added 
to the membership of the Y. C. C. 
MARY ASTON LEAVELL has been 



acting as Youth Editor for this paper for 
some time. As she leaves this task to 
someone else, the editor would like to 
express his "thanks" to her. It gives 
us the opportunity to remind all young 
people to forward their news speedily. 
The job of Youth Editor is a hard one 
when only a few of our groups forward 
news of their activities. 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS (Continued) 



THE REV. C. G. LEAVELL, Rector 
of Grace Church, Morganton, since Oc- 
tober 1, 1942, and also Priest-in-Charge 
of St. Stephen's — Morganton, St. Mary's 
— Quaker Meadows, and St. Paul's — 
Burke County, resigned to the Vestry 
of Grace Church and to the Bishop as of 
October 15th. He has accepted a call 
to become Rector of Grace Church, Cis- 
mont, Walker Parish, in the Diocese of 
Virginia. Walker Parish is a rural parish 
centered around Grace Church, Cismont, 
some ten miles east of Charlottesville, 
Va. Mr. Leavell will be missed in this 
Diocese; he served as delegate to gen- 
eral Convention, as Secretary of the 
Executive Council, as Chm. of the De- 
partment of Missions, as an Examining 
Chaplain, and was active as a Counse- 
lor and Director of Diocesan youth. 

THE REV. RALPH K. WEBSTER 

has been appointed as Chaplain to 
Christ School, Arden. He comes from 
the Diocese of South Florida to his new 
duties, although our Diocese is "home" 
to him; Fr. Webster was formerly in 
charge of St. Francis', Rutherfordton. 
The Websters moved to Christ School 
in September and are living in a new 
home recently acquired for the Chaplain. 

THE REV. WM. C. CRAVNER, Rec- 
tor of St. Mark's, Gastonia has tendered 
his resignation to the Vestry. The resig- 
nation was dated July 31st, 1950, and 
is to become effective within the next 6 
months. Mr. Cravner intends to retire 
from the active ministry and live in 
Alabama where he has a home. Prior 



to his rectorship at St. Mark's, he was 
Rector of All Soul's, Biltmore. 

ST. MATTHIAS', ASHEVILLE, re- 
cently broke ground for the building of 
their Rectory which will be on the 
Church property. The Diocese rejoices 
that St. Matthias' has taken this for- 
ward step; a step almost necessary for 
their procuring a resident minister. 

The women of ST. PAUL'S MIS- 
SION, BURKE COUNTY, recently 
gave an "ice cream supper" at the 
power plant grounds on Lake James 
and cleared over $127.00. The men of 
St. Paul's had previously given their la- 
bor in wiring the church for electric 
lights. Valle Cruris Rural Worker Stu- 
dents in the persons of Messrs. Edward 
Ostertag, Richard Adams, and David 
Gleason conducted a Daily Vacation 
Bible School at St. Paul's with thirty 
children in attendance. The same week 
a Preaching Mission was held by the 
Priest-in-Charge at which the students 
answered questions from the mission 
question box. Attendance built up stead- 
ily each of the five evenings from thirty 
to sixty persons. Messrs Richard Adams 
and Edward Ostertag also worked in suc- 
cessful Daily Vacation Bible Schools at 
Grace Church, Morganton, St. Mary's, 
Quaker Meadows, and St. Stephen's, 
Morganton. 

SISTER MARGARET of the Eng- 
lish Order of St. Margaret addressed a 
large group of women from the churches 
in the Asheville area on August 31 con- 
cerning the work of the order in Haiti. 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS (Continued) 



Sister Margaret's visit was sponsored by 
the St. Mary's, Asheville, and Trinity, 
Asheville, Auxiliaries. 

ST. MARY'S, QUAKER MEA- 
DOWS, recently observed their "home- 
coming" celebration. The Bishop de- 
livered the sermon for the occasion, and 
officiated in the rite of Confirmation. In 
September a fine class was confirmed by 
the Bishop at ST. STEPHENS, MOR- 
GANTON. That occasion was marked 
by large attendance and a delectable 
congregational dinner after the cere- 
monies. 

A joint luncheon-meeting of the wom- 
en from St. Mary's, Trinity, All Souls', 
St. George's, and Calvary Churches 
heard the Bishop address them on 'The 
Woman's Auxiliary, Its Responsibility 
and Work in the Diocese" on September 
11. The luncheon was served at All 
Souls', Biltmore. 

HOLY CROSS, TRYON, communi- 
cants who are entering the Armed Forces 
are being given Episcopal Service Cross- 
es by the Church and urged to wear 
them as signs of their Churchmanship. 

MRS. SAMUEL B. STROUP has 
moved to Asheville and is living at 90 
Annandale St. Mrs. Stroup is the widow 
of the Rev. Samuel B. Stroup, Rector 
many years at the Church of the Ascen- 
sion, Hickory. Her many friends will be 
happy to hear of her return to W.N.C. 

FORMER EDITOR of THE HIGH- 
LAND CHURCHMAN, the Rev. Dud- 
ley J. Stroup, a son of The Rev. and 
Mrs. Samuel Stroup, has recently been 
named full-time executive of news, radio, 
and publication of the Diocese of Al- 
bany. Fr. Stroup was priest-in-charge of 
St. Luke's, Chunns Cove. 

The bulletin of ST. JAMES, LE- 
NOIR, reports that the young people 
have been unusually active in St. James 
Parish this summer. Through the kind- 
ness of Mr. George W T iese we had Mr. 
Dave Gleason, theological student, who 
assisted in conducting a most successful 
Dairy Vacation Bible School. The School 



closed with a basket picnic held on Pat- 
terson School grounds, the whole Parish 
participating. Mr. Gleason preached and 
held services (with the assistance of the 
Pyerly boys) on the Sundays in August. 
The services were greatly enhanced by 
the help of Misses Betty and Mary 
Wiese and Lunda Lenoir, both in the 
Choir and at the organ. During the 
summer the following young men acted 
as ushers: Hal Miller, Thomas Win- 
borne, James Hogan, Grimes and Baxter 
Byerly and A. G. Miller. This enthusi- 
asm of the young people in the Church's 
work should make us older folks thank 
God and take courage. 

PAUL L. RITCH, JR., and WIL- 
LIAM SCOTT ROOT, postulants for 
Holy Orders from St. Mary's, Asheville, 
have entered upon their course of study 
a 1 " General Theological Seminary, New 
\ork City. 

THE REV. TAGE TEISEN, D.D, 
R.ector of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, Fla., was 
guest preacher at All Souls, Biltmore, on 
September 24th. 

The CONVOCATION of Morganton 
will meet in St. Paul's Church, N. 
\\ ilkesboro, on November 15th. The 
CONVOCATION of Asheville will meet 
ar the Church of the Incarnation, High- 
lands, on October 17th. 

Bishop Henry will deliver the address 
en THE EPISCOPAL HOUR broad- 
cast over many stations in our area on 
Sunday morning, October 22. On Oct. 
29, Bishop Clairborne, Suffragan of 
Alabama, will deliver the address. The 
Episcopal Hour is heard each Sunday 
morning over WWNC, Asheville, 
WHCC, Waynesville, WHKY, Hickory, 
WMNC, Morganton, WGNC, Gastonia. 

A previous note in the H. C. concern- 
ing interest in a practical WORKSHOP 
ON LITURGY ARTS received no ap- 
preciable response. The editor feels that 
such a "practicum" has great merit. The 
following studies have been forwarded 
cis suggestions: Liturgical drama; Litur- 
gical study in church schools of Lord's 



10 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS 



acre plan, biblical herbs, and. herb gar- 
dens; Church-related crafts such as 
wood, metal, and cloth for carvings, 
vessels, vestments, etc.; Choir festivals; 
Acolyte festivals; Liturgical days and 
retreats. If you are interested in such a 
"practicum," forward your suggestions. 

Fr. J. B. Sill, Diocesan Historograph- 
er, is custodian of the OLD DIOCESAN 
LIBRARY located in the former dio- 
cesan house, Ravenscroft, in Asheville. 
He has catalogued the volumes in that 
collection, selling some to libraries, cull- 
ing others. In the process he has dis- 
covered some interesting Americana. The 
total collection has accumulated for 
many, many years, going back to the 
days of Bishop Cheshire. Collectors in- 
terested in such material should com- 
municate with Fr. Sill. 

CALVARY CHURCH, FLETCH- 
ER: A new Bigelow carpet over sponge- 
rubber rug cushion has been laid in Cal- 
vary, across the back, up the aisle and 
across the front of the Nave, between the 
Choir stalls and in front of the Altar 
Rail. It is a light mulberry in color, and 
adds greatly to the beauty and quiet of 
the Church. The Rector claims one dis- 
advantage — now he cannot hear the ar- 
rival of late-comers, therefore cannot 
check (out of the corner of his eye) on 
who they are — and so can no longer ad- 



monish the tardy ones of the virtues of 
promptness. 

Three new, very beautiful stained an- 
tique glass windows have been installed 
in the Nave. One on the Gospel side 
shows Christ driving out the evil spirits 
from a man, and is a memorial to Mr. 
W. H. Stewart and his son, W. H. Stew- 
art, Jr. Mr. Stewart, Sr., was a Vestry- 
man at Calvary for many years. The 
first window on the Epistle side is of the 
"Parable of the Sower," and is a me- 
morial to Mrs. Walter Fletcher, for many 
years an active parishioner of Calvary 
Church. The second window on the 
Epistle side depicts the "Parable of the 
Lost Sheep," and is a memorial to Mr. 
and Mrs. Benjamin L. Shuford. Mr. 
Shuford was for many years a Vestry- 
man of Calvary Parish. All of these win- 
dows were dedicated by Bishop Henry 
on his visit to the Parish on September 
24th. 

This visit of our Bishop to Calvary 
was notable for another reason. The 
largest class in Calvary's history was 
piesented for confirmation. Bishop Hen- 
ry stated that it was the largest class 
(38) he had confirmed in his Episcopate. 
The Church was filled to overflowing 
for this Service. Bishop Henry spoke 
to the Sunday School before the ser- 
vice, at 10 a. m. — 180 children were 
crowded into the old Parish House to 
hear him. 



A WORD FROM THE EDITOR 

This issue of your church paper car- 
ries on page twelve a "Chapter in Dio- 
cesan History." Fr. Sill has compiled 
much material of permanent historical 
value. Such historical sketches should 
be carried regularly on our pages. The 
fact remains that our limited budget has 
not allowed us to do so. Other features 
have also been "cut." On the editor's 
desk for this issue was enough material 
to fill a 24 page edition; of necessity we 
cut the issue to 16 pages ! It is our policy 



NOT to make appeal for funds; on the 
other hand, there is a source of income 
available from advertising that has not 
been sufficiently explored. You can help 
us in forwarding names of pros- 
pective advertisers. THE HIGHLAND 
CHURCHMAN enters the very best 
homes in W.N.C. For manufacturing 
and distributing agencies serving the 
whole area of this diocese, there could 
be no better medium of advertising than 
your diocesan paper. Keep sending us 
news, and, send us names of prospective 
advertisers. 



11 



CHAPTERS IN DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The Rev. James B. Sill 

Diocesan Historiographer 

Early Days Of The Ascension, Hickory 

The starting of the Church's work 
in History was due to the interest of the 
rector of the neighboring parish of Grace 
Church, Morganton, Rev. Neilson Falls, 
who, at the direction of the Bishop At- 
kinson met with a small group of per- 
sons in 1872. A year later, on the Sunday 
before the Feast of the Ascension, they 
were organized into a parish, Mr. Falls 
continuing as rector until November. 
Hence the name chosen for the parish. 
Mrs. Richard Baker, wife of one of the 
town's earliest physicians, having, as 
reported, suggested the name. The pres- 
ent Richard Baker Hospital is a me- 
morial to her husband. Fifteen com- 
municants are reported at that time. 

The fortunes of Providence were fav- 
orable to the young parish in the coming 
to town in 1872 of Edward Noah Joy- 
ner, for the purpose of starting a school. 
The dioceses of North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and later the 'Jurisdiction of 
Western North Carolina, had occasions 
for many years to thank God for the 
ministry of this His servant, who was 
ordained deacon at Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton in 1873, and priest there in 1877, 
continuing as rector of The Ascension 
from 1873 to 1879. Edward Joyner, at 
the age of 17, had enlisted in an artillery 
company in 1864, which as stationed near 
Wilmington, and which was engaged in 
both battles of Fort Fisher. Edward was 
wounded and spent time in a hospital at 
the close of the war. His home was in 
Pitt County, N. C; his father a surgeon. 
For some years he continued his edu- 
cation, at the Davis School, Louisberg, 
and the Horner School, Oxford, and at 
Trinity College, Hartford. In 1871 he 
married Mary E. Winfield of Chocowin- 
ity, N. C.j having two children, a son 
ard a daughter. He was therefore age 25 
in becoming rector of The Ascension. 
After services of the parish were held in 



various houses and in a borrowed Church 
building, a lot was secured and a Church 
building started, the cornerstone being 
laid Nov. 20th, 1878, and the Church 
consecrated by Bishop Lyman July 31st, 
1881, during the rectorship of the Rev. 
John Huske, 1880 to 1882. The Church 
was a wooden structure, heated with 
wood-burning stoves, and lighted with 
kerosene lamps. It had windows of 
stained glass. A bell was hung in a tower 
built separately from the Church build- 
ing. The value of the Church is given 
as $1500.00. There were 40 communi- 
cants at this time. We find in the early 
records the names of the following 
Church families; Baker, Baskin, Ander- 
son, Black, Beard, Davis, Hill, Finger, 
Hardin, Clinard, Fleming, Hall, Moore, 
Little, Fetter, Michael, Morgan, Paal- 
zow, Royster, Southerland, Shuler, and 
Walker. Members of the Little, South- 
erland, Clinard, and Finger families still 
live in Hickory, on near-by. 

I am indebted to William and Weston 
Clinard for reminiscences of those early 
days. Their father, Frank A. Clinard 
and Mother, Gertrude E. Clinard, for- 
merly of the Jones family, were married 
in 1876 by the Rev. E. N. Joyner, in the 
"borrowed" German Reformed Church. 
"It was a great event not only for the 
Episcopalians but also for the whole 
community. Business was suspended and 
the stores closed for the occasion. It was 
Mr. Joyner's first wedding ceremony, 
and it bore the distinction of being the 
first marriage in any Church in the 
community destined to become the city 
of Hickory." Frank Clinard became ac- 
tive in the parish and a representative at 
diocesan conventions. 

The building of the railroad from Sal- 
isbury to Asheville, completed in 1876, 
marked the real beginning of the town of 
Hickory, which grew up near the place 
where the old Tavern of Hickory was lo- 
cated, the settlement being known at first 
as Hickory Tavern. In a few years a city 
government was formed. The Church of 



12 



the Ascension and the town grew up 
together. The Church members were rep- 
resentative of the farming, professional, 
and business interests of the town. The 
growing and manufacturing of tobacco 
was quite an industry, later to be re- 
placed by wood-working factories, as the 
Piedmont Wagon Co., the Hickory Mfg. 
Co., makers of doors, blinds, etc., and 
companies dealing in lumber and build- 
ing materials. 

Rev. James A. Weston became rector 
in 1883, staying three years, then return- 
ing in 1891 to continue for fourteen 
years. He was beloved in the parish and 
became prominent in diocesan affairs. 

IN LOVING MEMORY 

"To perpetuate the memory of loved 
ones who have gone on, or the Christian 
influence of persons still living, a Me- 
morial Fund has been set up at the 
1 hompson Orphanage. These memorial 
funds are carefully and conservatively 



administered by the Orphanage and are 
used for the benefit of the children who 
have found a home there. Acknowledge- 
ment of each gift is made to the donor 
and to the family of the person whose 
memory is being honored. 

Many people have made it a practice 
to send a contribution to the Orphanage 
instead of flowers at the death of a loved 
one. The Memorial Fund is becoming 
more and more a help financially — 
through this plan you can honor your 
loved ones and at the same time help 
the children of Thompson Orphanage. 
Just send your gift with a note giving 
your name and address, the name of the 
person who has died, and the name and 
address of the nearest of kin so that an 
acknowledgement can be made. Address 
your contribution to Thompson Orphan- 
age, Charlotte 4, N. C. 



DECEMBER 3: MEN'S CORPORATE 
COMMUNION DATE 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Hymnal 1940 Companion; Book of Common 
Prayer; A Prayer Book for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy, lay officials 
and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, and their 
immediate families. Services include individual insurance programming 
and assistance to parish officials in preparing and establishing plans 
for retirement of lay employees. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire, windstorm and extended coverage. Insurance on prop- 
erty owned by or closely affiliated with the Church, and on the resi- 
dences and personal property of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 

20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



13 



THE INTERNATIONAL COUN- 
CIL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

has been gathering statistics on Church 
membership and growth of enroll- 
ment in Church schools. The Epis- 
copal Church is among the eight Com- 
munions showing the largest gains in 
Church school enrollment during the 
year 1949. For 1949, 546,064, which in- 
cludes 489,423 pupils and 56,641 teach- 
ers, both overseas and in the Linked 
States; while the 1947 total was 475,328. 
The gain is 70,736. It is believed that the 
College of Preachers training courses 
and the regional training courses con- 
ducted under the auspices of the Nation- 
al Council's Department of Christian 
Education are reflected in these figures 
of growth. 

Over and over again from the FOR- 
EIGN STAFF in all parts of China 
comes the appeal for the prayers of 
friends everywhere. "Life here is extra- 
ordinarily complicated and full of frus- 
trations. Physically I have never been 
better . . . We get pretty depressed but 
it is quite impossible to assess the value 
of any work . . . All we can do is to try 
to offer what we are doing, with all its 
imperfections. So pray, and get others 
to pray." 

Writing about China in THE NEW 
YORKER, Christopher Rand said, "A 
factor that greatly beclouds the issue 
is that it isn't just a question of abstract 
communism. Communism has infil- 
tiated Chinese thought with results that 

SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursda\ 

William C. Cravner. Rector 



TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



are yet only dimly understood and Chi- 
nese traditions may have a strong effect 
on the final synthesis." 

THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIE- 
TY has published a special edition of 
50,000 copies of Korean Scriptures for 
distribution to the Korean Army, Navy 
and Air Force. The edition was printed 
at the request of the Korean Bible So- 
ciety, the headquarters of which are at 
Seoul. Episcopal Church people have 
special interest in this because the Amer- 
ican Bible Society has been aided by the 
Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Re- 
lief ,and will continue to receive help 
from the 1950 program for world relief 
and Church cooperation. 

Trinity parish, St. Clair Shores, Mich., 
has adopted a family of DISPLACED 
PERSONS. They are Bulgarian-born 
Ivan Kristeff, his wife ind two-year old 
son. The congregation has assumed re- 
sponsibility for finding and furnishing a 
home, getting Kristeff a job, and assist- 
ing the family to become acquainted 
with American ways of life. The family 
is among the 23 European displaced per- 
sons being placed in the diocese of 
Michigan. 

IN THE PANAMA CANAL ZONE 

the percentage of Episcopal Church peo- 
ple in the whole population is said to be 
the highest in the western hemisphere. 
They are more numerous than Roman 
Catholics or any other kind of Christians. 



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A Church School of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina. Accredited. Grades 6-12. 41st. yr. 
1300-acre estate. Gymnasium sports. Low Cost. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood, N. C. TYPING 
PREPARATORY FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



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APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 

(Continued From Page 3) 
replacement raises another problem — 
the only source of income for these pur- 
poses are from the people of the Diocese. 
The needs and exigencies of this school 
were mentioned at length at the 1950 
Diocesan Convention — a digest of the 
school's report is on pages 67 and 68 of 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



the Diocesan Journal. The Secretary of 
the Diocese would be happy to mail 
copies of the Journal to interested per- 
sons. 

The people of this Diocese should 
know their institutions and keep in- 
formed of their condition. As a function- 
ing agency of the Diocese, Appalachian 
School solicits your prayers, your in- 
terest, your gifts. . . 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
-Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girk owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 




Manti 
urajman 




VOL. XXI 



NOVEMBER, 1950 



LATE FALL- 
ADVENT 
ISSUE 



NO. 



§>ttr-up ^un&ag (Eollprt 

Sunday Next Before Advent 

STIR up, we beseech thee, O Lord, 
the wills of thy faithful people; 
that they, plenteously bringing forth 
the fruit of good works, may by thee 
be plenteously rewarded; through 
Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



tttye ifigfjlanb 
GUjurrtjman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville, N. C. 



PREPARE YE THE WAY 

In the wee hours of a recent morning 
we were twisting the dial of our radio 
listening to the trivia of the mid-night 
disk jockeys. One such human juke-box 
was discussing with his listeners what 
appeared to be a grave problem, name- 
ly, "How soon in the Fall should be 
played Bing Crosby's popular record, 
'I'm dreamin' of a white Christmas'?". 
After several long distance phone calls 
from listeners over a wide area, he came 
to this conclusion, "To be discreet, and, 
not to 'rush the season', the record 
should not be played until after Thanks- 
giving Day"! Indeed! 

Lest we become too critical of our 
secular world, we should be reminded 
that many saints within the Church of- 
ten get so excited in anticipating the Fes- 
tival of Christ's Birth that they forget 
the discipline and preparation necessary 
for real appreciation of Christmas. True, 
they may sing the song of the angelic 
choir, yet they never hear the original 
rendition. True, they can tell of the 



Babe in Bethlehem's manger, yet they 
never experience the birth of the Incar- 
nate God within their own lives. Bing 
may sing of Christmas at Thanksgiving 
time — we must not, else the great Gloria 
will only be a traditional recording; 
not our soul's dearest experience. 

Our good friend Simeon Stylites writ- 
ing in THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 
some weeks ago told a rather human 
story. May I retell it? Some good peo- 
ple from the hinterland decided to make 
a trip to the big city; they wanted to 
see more than anything else the smash 
broadway hit "South Pacific" — all their 
friends urged them to attend the show. 
They arrived in the city, went to the 
ticket office, and discovered that tickets 
were sold out many weeks ahead. How 
could they go back home without seeing 
it; what would their friends think? They 
did the next best thing. They went to a 
record shop, borrowed the record album 
"South Pacific" and carefully listened to 
the play thus recorded. Next they hunt- 
ed up a used ticket broker and bought 
stubs of used tickets from the theater 
where the hit was staged. Thus armed 
with the memory of music from a vic- 
trola record and stubs of someone elses 
tickets, they went home to tell their 
friends of the wonders they had seen 
and heard in the city. 

We can be observers of the Great 
Drama, or, we can merely hold the stubs 
of someone elses' experience. We are 
told that there are only so many shop- 
ping days 'til Christmas. May we sug- 
gest that there are only so many "search- 
ing days" 'til Christmas — that search- 
ing, that quest, that discipline, that pre- 
paration is ADVENT. 



THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH SER- 
VICE CROSS should be given to every 
man and woman entering any branch of 
the armed services from any Episcopal 
parish. The Cross is a distinct mark of 
an Episcopal Church member in the 
armed forces and may be worn attached 
to the identification tags. Information 
may be had from the Armed Forces Di- 
vision, 281 Fourth Ave. (N. Y. C.) 



HAVE YOU FOUND? 'The major- 
ity of Christmas cards offered for sale 
have not even the remotest connection 
with the real meaning of the Christmas 
season. They are pagan in spirit. They 
are far more appropriate for the Roman 
Saturnalia or the heathen Yule season 
than for the celebration of the birth of 
our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. 
What is the sense in sending others tok- 
ens of gladness bearing good wishes with 
the reason for so doing omitted, or ig- 
nored? Surely it should not be too much 
for one to expect to receive Christian 
cards from Christian people at Christ- 
mas!" — Southern Churchman, May 6, 
1950. 

— Holy Cross Courier, Tryon. 



The publishing date of THE HIGH- 
LAND CHURCHMAN has in the past 
been marked as the "10th day" of the 
month. We have taken the liberty to 
move this one way or another; our reas- 
ons are good, we think. This issue has 
been "held" until Advent, although 
it is the November issue. The 
December issue will be mailed as a 
Christmastide issue, quite late in Decem- 
ber. Whenever possible, we shall vary 
publishing dates to meet the high points 
in the Church Calendar. So, if you feel 
you have not received your copy on 
time, take heart. Also involved is the 
''element of surprise"! 



ASKS FOR A REALLY CHRIS- 
TIAN OBSERVANCE OF CHRIST- 
MAS THIS YEAR. Ashfield, Mass.— 
The Rev. Philip H. Steinmetz, who is 
rector of an Episcopal Church and pas- 
tor of a Congregational - Christian 
Church, is telling people that right now 
they should be thinking about Christ- 
mas . . . not about their card list or 
gift list, but about making one of the 
most sacred days in the year, actually 
and truly, a Christian festival. 

"Christmas," said Mr. Steinmetz, "is 
a day in which our very best effort 
should be given to showing Jesus Christ 
our great love for Him, and our joy at 
His birth." 

Air. Steinmetz said that if we sit down 
and think about the ways in which we 
do celebrate Christmas, we are certain to 
be dissatisfied. He suggests to all Chris- 
tian people: 

Think over the following questions 
and make plans in line with the answers 
to them: 

Which of the special Christmas events 
in town really express our joy over the 
birth of Christ, and which are just par- 
ties? 

How much of the money we spend for 
Christmas cards, gifts, extra food, etc., 
is spent in order to bring joy to the One 
whose birthday it is? 

What are you going to do about it 
this Year of Our Lord 1950? 



National Council of The Churches of Christ In The U. S. A. 

When the National Council of the important gathering of non-Roman 
Churches of Christ in the U. S. A. is Christians in the history of the Amer- 
constituted in Cleveland, November 28 ican Church." It marks the organiza- 
— December 3, the whole Episcopal ticn of an agency that will serve the 
Church is vitally concerned. Presiding interests of 27 Church bodies, including 
Bishop Henry Knox Sherrill said recent- a number of the Eastern Orthodox 
ly: "The formation of the National Churches. The combined Church mem- 
Council of Churches in a time of world bership represented is over 26,000,000. 
confusion and strife, is a hopeful event There will be coordination of the activi- 
of vital importance. Here is proof of ties of the various Churches in certain 
the great underlying spirit of cooperation work in foreign and home missions, 
among the Churches and a promise that Christian education, evangelism, race re- 
in action together we will face the great lations and national and international 
issues and opportunities of our time." affairs. Actually some eight national 

The forthcoming constituting conven- agencies now in existence in the Lmited 

tion has been described as "the most States, serving some 50 Communions, 



NATIONAL COUNCIL— Con't. 

will become departments of the new 
agency. These are: the International 
Council of Religious Education, the For- 
eign Missions Conference of North 
America, the Missionary Education 
Movement, the Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America, the 
Home Missions Council, the Protestant 
Council on Higher Education, the United 
Stewardship Council and the United 
Council of Church Women. 

At the Cleveland convention, an at- 
tendance of over 6,000 is expected, with 
1,200 official delegates and 5,000 visiting 
delegates, probably the most widely rep- 
resentative Church gathering ever held 
on the North American continent. 

On December 3, the Sunday following 
the Cleveland convention, nation-wide 
services of rededication, to express 
thanksgiving and support for the Na- 
tional Council of Churches, will be held 
in conjunction with services in thousands 
of churches. 

It has been pointed out by the plan- 
ning committee that this new body is in 
no sense a merger of denominations, but 
that it does represent a "deliberate 
policy" of cooperation, which will have 
the effect of bringing Churches closer 
together. It is believed that a wider 
recognition of women's work in the 
Church will grow out of the new Council, 
as well as a stronger voice for laymen 
in Church affairs. The Council will 
serve as a clearing house for information 
and exchange of views to forward the 
development of a sound strategy on key 
issues. It is believed, too, that local 
churches will benefit, through increased 
influence in the community through re- 
lationship to a national body united for 
Christian service and action. 

The Council first was conceived as an 
idea nearly ten years ago at a meeting 
of interdenominational agency leaders at 
Atlantic City. Since then the plan has 
grown slowly but inevitably and has 
been studied carefully by the agencies 
and the various Church groups. Under 
direction of the planning committee 
headed by Dr. Luther A. Weigle, dean 



emeritus of Yale University Divinity 
School, the Council will take form and 
substance at the Cleveland convention in 
November. 

There are 29 regularly appointed rep- 
resentatives of the Episcopal Church to 
the constituting convention, and ten al- 
ternates. In addition, the Episcopal 
Church is entitled to 203 visiting dele- 
gates who may witness the convention 
events but who are without vote. 

The Presiding Bishop will head the 
Episcopal group, he having been a mem- 
ber of the committee on program and 
procedure since its organization. 



Through the help of the Episcopal 
Church to the WORLD COUNCIL OF 
CHURCHES, 33 Russian Orthodox 
nuns, displaced by two world wars, are 
being located in Paris through action of 
the WCC Department of Inter-Church 
Aid and Service to Refugees. The nuns 
are members of a group which originat- 
ed at the Lesnitzky convent in Poland. 
Driven from Leszno during World War 
I, 70 of the nuns found refuge in Yugo- 
slavia. There, under jurisdiction of the 
Serbian Orthodox they continued their 
work of religious instruction for nearly 
30 years, all the while maintaining con- 
tact with the Orthodox Theological In- 
stitute in Paris. During World War II 
their convent was destroyed by a Yugo- 
slav terrorist group. 



TWENTY-FOUR BISHOPS, most of 
them younger members of the House of 
Bishops, went to school at the College 
of Preachers, Washington, D. C, recent- 
ly. They received an intensive course in 
Christian education techniques, the same 
course as has been given to many of the 
younger clergy under auspices of the Na- 
tional Council's Department of Chris- 
tian Education and the College of 
Preachers. The course lasted five days. 



THE BISHOP'S PAGE 



ADVENT 

Advent marks the beginning of the Church Year; the old Calendar begins 
anew. We start afresh by hearing of the Mighty Acts of God through which he is 
reconciling the world to himself. 

As the new year begins, it is natural for us to take stock of ourselves. We 
look back over the past year, and we see in our Church life how "we have left 
undone those things which we ought to have done, and (how) we have done those 
things which we ought not to have done and (why) there is no health in us." To 
begin again, we must rethink our past, and, make new plans. This is penitence. 
It is the same penitence as that of Lent. 

The very name "Advent" points to the coming of Christ into the world. 
Imagine yourself a housekeeper. A great guest is coming. Does not every house- 
keeper "clean up the guest room, and do a little extra" in order to receive a guest 
properly? Advent in the Church Year is our season for making ready for The 
Guest. This, too, is penitence of the same sort as we have in Lent. 

Penitence for too many people is looking back and feeling sorry. Penitence 
is shown in its true light in Advent — it is a forward look; a time when we antici- 
pate the coming of The Guest. It is the anticipation expressed in the Invitation to 
Holy Communion for those who "intend to lead a new life." 

Rethink your past; that you might build anew. Open your lives afresh; that 
The Guest, THE CHRIST, might be received. Lead a new life as we begin the 
new year in the Church. 

The Bishop's Schedule 

November 15: Morganton Convocation, St. Paul's, Wilkesboro. 

8:00 P. M. — Service and congregational meeting, Spruce Pine. 
November 16: Appalachian School Board Meeting, at Penland. 

6:00 P. M. — Service and Address at Christ School Arden. 
November 19: 8 A. M. — St. Andrew's Canton, Holy Communion. 

11:00 A. M. — Grace Church in the Mountains, Waynesville. 
November 20-26: Preaching Mission at St. James Church, Lenoir. 
November 22: 10 A. M. — Speak at Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory. 
November 23 : 11 A. M. — Sermon at Joint Thanksgiving Day Service, Lenoir. 
December 1 : Congregational Dinner, St. George's, West Asheville. 
December 3: 9:30 A. M.— Confirmation St. Mary's, Asheville, N. C. 
11:00 A. M. — Church of the Transfiguration, Bat Cave. 

8:00 P. M. — Church of the Ascension, Hickory. 
December 7: Valle Crucis Board Meeting. 
December 10: 8 A. M. — Asheville School For Boys. 
11 A. M. — Asheville School For Boys. 

8 P. M. — Church School Teachers Institute, St. Agnes, Franklin. 
December 11: 8 P. M. — Church School Teachers Institute, Trinity, Asheville. 
December 12: 12 M. — Patterson School Board, Spindale, N. C. 

8 P. M. — Church School Teachers Institute, Ascension, Hickory. 
December 13: 3 P. M. — Address, Woman's Club in Murphy. 
December 17:11 A. M.— St. Philip's Brevard . 

8 P. M.— Holy Cross, Tryon. 
December 24: 11 A. M. — St. Andrew's, Canton. 

11:30 P. M. — Holy Communion, Church of the Redeemer, Craggy. 
December 25: 11 A. M. — Holy Communion, Grace Church, Asheville. 

s 



TEACHER TRAINING COURSES 



(Rev.) Richard J. Lee, Chm. 
Children's Commission 
Dep't. of Christian Education of the 
Diocese 
At last we are beginning to see a little 
daylight in the field of Religious Educa- 
tion. The necessary preliminary details 
have taken a great deal of time and 
thought and your Diocesan Children's 
Commission now feel that we are ready 
to launch into our much needed Teach- 
er's Training Courses. We have divided 
the Diocese into three sections, thereby, 
making it more accessible for attendance 
at our quarterly meetings. 

We hope to hold our first meeting in 
the Western District, on Dec. 10th. fol- 
lowed by a similar meeting in the Cen- 
tral District on Dec. 11th and in the 



Eastern District on the evening of Dec. 
'12th. All meetings will begin at 7:30 
P. M. with an address by our Bishop, 
followed by an opportunity for general 
discussion. We shall then divide into 
five groups for intensive study, with an 
appointed director in charge of each 
group. The study groups will be as fol- 
lows. — GROUP 1. — Nursery and Kin- 
dergarten. GROUP 2.— Grades 1 to 3 
inclusively. GROUP 3. — Grades 4 to 6. 
GROUP 4. — Grades 7 to 10, and 
GROUP 5.— Grade 11 and up. 

The Rev. Robert J. McCloskey has 
kindly consented to act as Vice-Chair- 
man of the Western and Central Dis- 
tricts. Further information with full de- 
tails will be mailed to all parishes and 
missions. 



CONVOCATIONS MEET 



The Convocation of Asheville met at 
Incarnation, Highlands, on October 17. 
A good representation from all areas 
within the convocation was evident. Re- 
ports from all parishes and missions rep- 
resented were heard concerning mission- 
ary activitiy; the reports had an ecumen- 
ical flavor! The main business con- 
cerned election of a Dean — the Very 
Rev. Rufus Morgan having been in of- 
fice the limit of lawful term; the Secre- 
tary, Mr. Wm. Tyndale, also needed a 
successor. The elections were difficult 
due to the very evident modesty of the 
nominees. In due course, the Very Rev. 
Grover Mark Jenkins was elected Dean; 
Mr. John McTammany, in charge of the 
Redeemer, Craggy, was elected Secre- 
tary. Fr. Webbe, diocesan chm. of the 
every-member-canvass, gave a report of 
the EMC plans and answered questions 
concerning the program. The retiring 
officers of the Convocation were recog- 
nized with regard to their leadership in 
the years past. The whole affair was en- 
riched by the panorama of the mountains 
in the Fall. A delightful lunch was 
served to the Convocation atop a hill 
overlooking Sunset Mountain. 

The Convocation of Morganton met at 



St. Paul's, Wilkesboro, on November 15. 
The Bishop of the Diocese celebrated 
Holy Communion in the historic old 
Church. Fr. Peter Lambert, dean, pre- 
sented a short period of instruction con- 
cerning the choral settings of the Offices 
and Holy Communion as found in THE 
HYMNAL. A recording of Choral 
Communion was played. The Rev. 
Robert J. McCloskey directed discussion 
concerning the "Attitudes of Churchmen 
towards other Christians." The theme 
was developed in lieu of the forthcoming 
assembly for the formation of the Na- 
tional Council of the Churches of Christ 
in the ILS.A. to be held in early Advent 
at Cleveland. Canon Wedel's Coming 
Great Church was suggested as a good 
source of understanding the main issues 
of church disunity even though his con- 
clusions may not be accepted by all 
Churchmen. 



Discussing the subject of racial segre- 
gation, one of our more prominent cler- 
gymen said: "Regardless of the progress 
we have made, it is still true that segre- 
gation reaches its highest point at eleven 
o'clock Sunday morning." 



PRIEST'S FELLOWSHIP 

The clericus of the Diocese met in All 
Saintstide, Nov. 9, at Christ School, Ar- 
den. The clergy attended Holy Com- 
munion in the school Chapel with the 
student body; Fr. Webster, chaplain, 
celebrated. The first paper of the 
day, "Christianity and Psychiatry" was 
prepared and read by the Rev. 
John \V. Tuton. The Rev. Gale 
Webbe was the respondent to the thesis. 
The clericus adjourned for lunch, return- 
ing to hear a paper "The Liturgical Re- 
vival in the Evangelical Churches" in 
the afternoon. The Rev. Robert J. Mc- 
Closkey was the essayist. Following the 
discussion there was held election of of- 
ficers, the Rev. Albert P. Mack presid- 
ing. New officers elected: President, Fr. 
Webster; Treasurer, Fr. Sill; Secretary, 
Mr. McCloskey. The Rev. Robert 
Campbell acted as Secretary pro-tem. 
Greetings were ordered sent to absent 
members. Eighteen clergy were present. 



elected presiding officer of the Synod. 
Among those delegates from the Diocese 
of W.N.C. were the Bishop, the Rev. 
Messers. Jenkins, Morgan, McCloskey, 
Winters; Messers. Balthis, Wiese, and 
Tyndall. 



PROVINCIAL SYNOD 

The Provincial Synod met in Tampa, 
Fla., on October 10 & 11. The Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Synod met at the same 
time. The several Departments and 
Commissions of the Province reported 
on their work and needs. Bishop Henry, 
chm. of the provincial department of 
promotion, urged support of The Epis- 
copal Hour by all dioceses in the next 
three years. The Synod included these 
costs in the budget adopted, and recom- 
mended official action to receive funds 
to cover costs of the broadcast in 1951. 
The expanded building program of the 
University of the South at Sewanee was 
explained and Dioceses and churches 
urged to remember that expanded facil- 
ties at the Seminary now would some- 
what alleviate clergy shortages in years 
to come. The Kanuga Conference pro- 
gram was presented by Mr. Willard 
Yerduin, manager. Canon T. 0. Wedel 
of Washington addressed the Synod at 
the evening service on the 10th concern- 
ing the great need of the Church to be 
the vehicle of the Covenant between God 
and His people. Bishop Penick was re- 



DIOCESAN YOUTH CONVENTION 

Peggy Jean Horton 
P. 0. Box 139 

Hickory, N. C. 

Upon arriving at the Grace Church in 
Morganton, we went to the church and 
registered. That night we had a delici- 
ous supper at the church prepared by 
the women of the church. After supper 
David Reid, president of the young 
churchmen, welcomed us to the conven- 
tion and introduced our speaker for the 
night, Mr. C. F. Cole, from Charlotte, 
N. C. We afterward had a square dance 
in the parish house. At 10:15 we had 
prayers and then everyone went to 
the homes where they had been placed 
for the night. 

The next morning was the big day 
of the convention. At 8:15 we had Holy 
Communion in the church. At 9:00 we 
enjoyed breakfast at one of the cafes in 
downtown Morganton. The business 
session was called to order at 10:15 
by David Reid, president. We were 
led in prayer by the Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Youth Commissioner. We had reports 
from the different churches represented 
on what the Youth Groups were doing. 
After the reports. Bishop Henry talked 
to us about knowing the church and 
making it known. After his talk we had 
a five minute recess. We started the 
business session with the election of of- 
ficers for the coming year. They are as 
follows : 

President — Clara Kate Boggs. 

Vice-President — Dick Bartlett. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Bob Jeeter. 

Youth Commission Province — David 
Reid. 

Editor of the Youth News — Peggy 
Horton. 



THE PATTERSON SCHOOL 

Another of our Diocesan institutions 
about which we have heard a great deal 
in the past few years is the Patterson 
School for Boys. Members of the Epis- 
copal Church and other friends have 
rightly judged the school's program to 
be a missionary project, designed to de- 
velop intelligent Christian gentlemen. 
Since the State's school bus system has 
made it possible for every child to enjoy 
a free education, the original mission of 
the school as a school for mountain boys 
has been completed. The usefulness of 
the school can be seen by noting alumni 
in the ranks of the ministry, manufac- 
turers, business men, agricultural and 
other professional fields. We are proud 
of the leadership they have given their 
respective communities. 

As the American way of life has 
changed, so has the school in order to 
meet the present day challenge. Its ser- 
vice has been extended to students of 
other States and distant communities. At 
present 15 States, Alaska, and Mexico 
are represented. These boys are intel- 
ligently prepared to take up any course 
they choose in college or university. The 
curriculum is so arranged that those who 
may not be interested in college training 
at present may nevertheless meet en- 
trance requirements if they decide later 
to take advantage of a college education. 
In either case, the additional electives 
of typing, agriculture, or forestry are 
available to those who desire them. 

The general trend in educational in- 
stitutions is to add military training. 
Most Americans are forcing themselves 
to believe that the way of peace is 
through war, which is contrary to Chris- 
tian teaching. We of the Patterson 



School hold the Christian view that peace 
comes only through faith in Our Lord 
and Saviour. Therefore, we feel that 
the strongest forces in life are developed 
in and through the influences of the 
Church. The power inherent in the 
Church is more effective than guns, mil- 
itary equipment, military knowledge, or 
all the combined military services. Here 
we cherish and value the Christian way 
of living and thinking to the end of de- 
veloping Christian character. Through 
the Church and all it stands for, the 
Patterson School seeks to train sound in- 
telligent Christian citizens of tomorrow. 

Physical education is also a part of 
the students' life. For the first time a 
full-time director of a Physical Education 
Department brings this training to every 
student in the school. Football, basket- 
ball, baseball and other forms of ath- 
letics are also encouraged. Here the 
student not only works off steam but 
plays to win in an honest, clean way. 
He has an opportunity to demonstrate 
real character, fast thinking, and skill- 
ful physical coordination. Athletics at 
Patterson School are a means of devel- 
oping the whole man. 

Our life is not all play, or even play 
and study — work also has a place. Each 
student does squad work which amounts 
to chores about a home. Work scholar- 
ships are also granted to good students 
which enable them to help pay a part 
of their expenses. These students work 
ten hours a week in addition to squad 
work. All work is honorable and is here 
treated as another part in each boy's 
education for citizenship. We share the 
values of honest work with each other 
and the school as you share the benefits 
of honest labor with your family, Church 
and community. 



PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS GROW IN 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH ESPECIAL- 
LY IN SOUTH— Episcopal parochial 
schools are spreading throughout the 
South, and their rapid growth during 
the past few years is "the Church's an- 
swer to a too materialistic public school 
system." So said the Rev. David C. 
Colony, rector of St. Martin's Episcopal 



Church, Metairie, La., and newly elected 
national president of the Episcopal 
parish school association. Mr. Colony 
said that during the last two years, elev- 
en Episcopal schools have been estab- 
lished in Louisiana, and "they are mush- 
rooming throughout the nation, especial- 
ly in the South." 



8 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Lanthe Rush Campbell 
Woman's Auxiliary Board Meeting 

The regular Fall meeting of the Ex- 
ecutive Board was held at the Church of 
The Ascension in Hickory. The dates 
and places for the Fall District meetings 
were revised as follows: 

District I. November 2nd, St. Mary's 
Asheville. 

District II and IV. November 3rd, 
Redeemer, Shelby. 

District II. November 8th, St. Mary's, 
Quaker Meadows. 

District V. November 5, St. Cyprian's, 
Franklin. 

You are urged to attend your district 
meeting. 

Mrs. Donald Shoemaker of Asheville 
was appointed The Woman's Auxiliary 
Representative to the North Carolina 
Council of Church Women. 

Your Executive Board is looking for- 
ward to The Training Institute which 
will be held in The Districts — in the 
Spring! 

Bishop Henry gave an encouraging 
picture of the work in the Diocese. He 
urged the members of the Woman's 
Auxiliary to help promote attendance at 
the Congregational meetings being held 
in various parts of the Diocese this fall, 
at which time key laymen will present 
the program of the Church with record- 
ings, slides and talks. He also asked 
that the women promote attendance at 
the three Teacher Training Institutes to 
be held on the following dates : 

December 10 — Franklin, St. Agnes, 
(For Southwestern part of Diocese). 

December 11 — Asheville, Trinity — 
(For Central part of Diocese). 

December 12 — Hickory, Ascension 
(For Diocese East of Marion). 

Time: 7:30 P. M. 

Mrs. Alex Menzies and Mrs. Robert 
Campbell were joint hostesses at a lunch- 
eon in the new rectory for the mem- 
bers, with Mrs. Henry and the Rev. 



and Mrs. Charles Leavell as special 
guests. 

HAPPENINGS THROUGHOUT 
THE DIOCESE 

Hendersonville — The four groups of 
the Woman's Auxiliary of St. James 
Church met this fall in the new Parish 
House. Miss Carrie Hughes presided. 
Mrs. Hugh Durham conducted the de- 
votional service. Mrs. A. B. Stoney of 
Morganton gave a most helpful talk 
about The United Thank Offering. Tea 
was served following the meeting. 

Shelby — A Girl's Friendly Society has 
been organized at Redeemer. The group 
is under the leadership of the Student 
and Youth Chairman, Mrs. B. T. Falls, 
Jr. 

A Y.P.S.L. has also been organized 
in Shelby. Congratulations to the Stu- 
dent and Youth Chairman! 

Hickory — At the September General 
meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. 
Mary Haden of Hendersonville, was the 
main speaker. Those attending received 
Mrs. Haden enthusiastically, and felt 
greatly helped by her inspiring message. 
Mrs. Lawrence Cline presided, and Mrs. 
John Coogler conducted the devotional 
service. A tea followed the meeting. The 
Hickory Auxiliary now has five circles. 

Lenoir — The two groups of the St. 
James Auxiliary are sponsoring the 
Bazaar to be held this Fall. 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER 

We are fast approaching one of the 
greatest days when we as Christian wo- 
men can join together: The World Day 
of Prayer. The next World Day of 
Prayer will be observed February 3. 
Last year out of a million and quarter 
Protestant women in North Carolina, 
around 20 thousand attended a World 
Day of Prayer Service. That number is 
far too small. Did you attend a service? 
The Episcopal Church is a prime mover 
in the Ecumenical Movement. So won't 
you start now to help those in your com- 
munity who are responsible for this ser- 
vice. 



ST. CYPRIANS, LINCOLNTON 

A contract and agreement has been 
made and entered into between the Dio- 
cese and the Town of Lincolnton to re- 
habilitate the old St. Cyprian's building 
into a chapel and recreational center for 
the colored people of the Community. 
The Rev. Richard J. Lee, Rector of St. 
Luke's Church, Lincolnton, presented 
the project to the Mayor and City Coun- 
cil and later secured the permission of 
The Bishop and Trustees to lease the 
building and land for a period of twenty 
years to the Recreation Commission of 
the Town of Lincolnton, with the under- 
standing that the Recreation Board re- 
habilitate and keep in proper repair .the 
entire building for the duration of the 
lease; that all major changes of the pres- 
ent building must be approved by the 
Bishop or by the Rector of St. Luke's 
Church-in-Lincolnton; that the chancel 
of the present building be shut off from 
the rest of the building by folding 
doors, to be used as the Chapel of St. 
Cyprians Church; that the nave of the 



present Church be converted into a re- 
creation room, and that it be expressly 
understood that the Church may use 
the entire building if deemed necessary 
for funerals, etc. 

This arrangement is placing Old St. 
Cyprian's Church back into the life of 
the Diocese, with little expense to the 
Diocese and at the same time providing 
a properly supervised center of recrea- 
tion for the colored people of the entire 
Community. A community men's club 
has already been organized with a mem- 
bership of around twenty. They meet ev- 
ery Friday night and after a short busi- 
ness session they have a devotional ad- 
dress by the Rector of St. Luke's and a 
good citizenship talk by a visiting speak- 
er. The colored adults can vision al- 
ready the civic, social, intellectual and 
religious benefits to be received by the 
establishment of such a center. What 
a wonderful opportunity for the Episco- 
pal Church to take these Negro girls and 
boys, men and women and help them to 
grow in wisdom and stature, in favor 
with God and with man. 



THE NEW ST. JAMES 

The congregation of ST. JAMES, 
HENDERSONVILLE, p r o u d 1 y ob- 
served recently the "moving in" of the 
old nave to the newly completed Choir 
and Sanctuary. The East Wall of the 
old Church was recently removed mak- 
ing use of the new section possible. 

The first service held in the new St. 
James was a christening on October 14. 
The second service was a celebration of 
the Holy Communion the next morning, 
the 19th Sunday after Trinity, at 8:00 
A. M. The third service was for the 
young people at 9:30 A. M., and the 
fourth service, attended by about 200 
people, was a special service of praise 
and thanksgiving to God. 

Father Sill assisted the rector with the 
Sunday morning services at 11:00 
o'clock. Three other clergy were pres- 
ent, two of them in procession, Rev. Dr. 
Nathan Seagle, of New York City; Rev. 
Dr. W. H. K. Pendleton, of Flat Rock; 
and the Rev. Dr. Hindry, of St. Augus- 
tine, Fla. 



The St. James choir, under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. F. W. Ewbank, led the con- 
gregation in singing appropriate and 
beautiful hymns, "Rejoice, Give Thanks, 
and Sing/' "Now Thank We All Our 
God," and "The Church's One Founda- 
tion." The Magnificat was used for the 
anthem, Miss Esther Gongdon singing 
the solo parts. 

The rector in his address pointed out 
that this was not a formal opening, but 
that we were just "moving in." 

For six Sundays, while the new 
Church was being joined to the old, ser- 
vices were held in the new Assembly 
Room in the Parish House. 

Strictly speaking, the new St. James 
is not a new building. The nave is the 
old nave built during the War Between 
the States and consecrated while the 
Battle of Chicamauga was being fought. 
The foundations of the Sanctuary, Choir, 
Morning Chapel, Organ Chamber, and 
the Sacristies of the new part were built 
about 40 years ago. All of this work 



10 




Palmyra Hall, Administration Building and Dormitory, Patterson School, Legerwood, North Carolina 



ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH, WEST 
ASHEYTLLE, was recent recipient of a 
gift of $300 from Trinity Church, Ashe- 
ville. The gift came from the budgeted 
funds of Trinity itemized as "evange- 
lism." Other parishes might well con- 
sider such methods of evangelism — 
through a new or strategic mission. 

DR. GEORGE F. TAYLOR will con- 
duct a teaching mission on "The Bible" 



at Trinity Church, Asheville, during the 
week of November 27th. 

Mr. "Bill" Verduin, resident business 
manager of KANUGA CONFER- 
ENCES, invited the Churchmen of the 
area to spend a few moments on Fall 
Sunday afternoons amid the glory of 
autumnal coloring at the beautiful set- 
ting which is Kanuga. The Chapel was 
open for prayers and recorded music 
was heard in the background. 



THE NEW ST. JAMES— Continued 

has now been completed and joined to 
the old nave. 

The bronze tablet in memory of the 
Rev. Reginald Norton Willcox was re- 
moved from the old chancel and will be 
placed in the new. During Fr. Willcox's 
rectorate plans for the new Church were 
made and the foundations laid. 

In addition to other memorials, a new 
Font and Prayer Desk have been given. 
The Font is given by Mr. and Mrs. J. K. 
Singletary in memory of the late Dr. 
N. Collin Hughes, father of the Misses 



Carolina and Elizabeth Hughes. The 
Litany Desk is given by Mrs. Carolyn 
Kimball Gibbs in memory of her broth- 
er, the Rev. Thatcher R. Kimball. 

A new General Electric Oil Heating 
Plant has been installed in one of the 
rooms of the basement in the new part 
of the building. A beautiful Cathedral 
Red Carpet has been laid over the whole 
Sanctuary and in the aisles leading to all 
doors. One of the great joys of the 
new plant is the fact that it contains 
new and ample choir and priests' sacris- 
ties. 



11 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS— FALL ROUNDUP 



THE REV. WILLIAM T. CAPERS 

on leave of absence from Holy Cross 
Church, Tryon, has tendered his resigna- 
tion to the Vestry due to his continued 
poor health. Mr. Caper's many friends 
in the Diocese trust his retirement will 
afford him chances for rest and improved 
health. The Rev. Newton Middleton, 
D.D., is continuing as locum tenens at 
Holy Cross. 

A large Confirmation Class was pre- 
sented at CHURCH OF THE ASCEN- 
SION in Hickory in October. This was 
the second class confirmed this year; an- 
other group will be presented before 
Christmas. 

TRINITY, ASHEVILLE, found it 
necessary to divide their congregation 
into two parts for the presentation of the 
Every Member Canvass drive; Trinity's 
Parish Hall not being large enough to 
accomodate the whole church family at 
supper at one time. These identical par- 
ish meetings were held on consecutive 
evenings, October 30th and 31st. The 
division of the congregation into two 
groups was arbitrarily effected — the 
split being alphabetically. 

UNITED THANK OFFERING Fall 
presentations from scattered reports 
seems to have been "up" considerably 
over the previous year. Due to the im- 
portant share of our mission program 
covered by UTO funds, this is indeed a 
good sign. 

ALL SOULS, BILTMORE, is care- 
fully examining the Earnest Ligon Char- 
acter Building Plan for adaptation to 
their program of Religious Education in 
the Parish. Dr. Ligon's Plan is a rela- 
tively new development in the field of 
religious education. Those interested in 
new techniques in religious education 
shall watch All Souls with great interest 
if the plan is adopted. 

HOLY CROSS, TRYON, reports hap- 
pily that a total number of seventy chil- 
dren and young people are included 
within their church family. 

On Sunday October 29, the Feast of 



Christ the King, in the course of Solemn 
Procession before the late mass, a mem- 
orial to Miss Maud Hamilton was 
blessed in ST. MARY'S CHURCH, 
ASHEVILLE. 

The memorial, consisting of a com- 
plete set of appointments surrounding 
the Font — a brocade dossal, an oak shelf 
with brass candlesticks, a brass font- 
cover, and an oak crucifix bearing the 
figure of Christ the King — is a magnifi- 
cent addition to the lovely physical 
equipment of St. Mary's, and fills a long- 
felt want. Beyond that, no more fitting 
memorial to Miss Hamilton could possi- 
bly be chosen, for in the early days of St. 
Marys' she stood at the Font on numer- 
ous occasions, as god-mother to children 
and adults. Surely her spirit still sur- 
rounds this hallowed spot in the church, 
as her memory lives in the hearts of 
those who knew her. 

The memorial is given to the glory of 
God and in memory of Maud Hamilton 
by Paul H. Gearhart of Buffalo, N. Y. It 
was designed by Charles Grigsby, work- 
ing in cooperation with Miss Blanche 
Hamilton, Robert Paterson, and Fred 
Maiwurm. 

THE CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH, 
MURPHY, Mr. William Bolton in 
charge, observed a "revival" conducted 
by Bishop Henry on September 18-22. 

The preceding week Bishop Henry 
was the speaker at the Murphy Lions 
Club meeting. During the week of the 
revival, in addition to preaching at the 
Church of the Messiah each night, Mon- 
day through Friday, he spoke to the 
Civitan Club Monday night, and met 
with the Episcopal Men's Club Tuesday 
night after the service. After the service 
on Wednesday night he was the preach- 
er at a service at St. Barnabas Church. 
Thursday he spoke at the Murphy 
School in the morning to the Andrews 
Rotary Club at noon and to the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary of the Church of the 
Messiah in the afternoon. 



12 



WITHIN OUR BORDERS— FALL ROUNDUP (Continued) 



ST. JAMES, BLACK MOUNTAIN, 
and TRINITY, HAW CREEK, though 
served by lay readers and a retired min- 
ister for the past two years has not been 
wholly inactive, and manifestations of in- 
terest and growth are encouragingly 
present. 

On the first Sunday in October the 
congregation observed Youth Sunday 
and a birthday of one of its eighty-one 
year old youngsters, with a service in 
which the young people of the Church 
took part; and was followed by a fel- 
lowship hour in the rectory, at which 
time a sumptous luncheon was served. 
The children of the Church school, 
wished to show their affection and ap- 
preciation of a beloved friend and teach- 
er, and the entire congregation joined 
them in it. Miss Carrie Maney, a long 
and devoted member of Saint James, 
who has served faithful in almost every 
phase of the Church's work received a 
beautiful tribute of appreciation from the 
Bishop of the Diocese, while the minis- 
ter expressed the appreciation of the con- 
gregation. The children of the Church 
School presented her with many gifts, 



gifts which expressed a deep and beau- 
tiful affection. The Saint James congre- 
gation, impressed with a deep sense of re- 
sponsibility, and awake to its opportuni- 
ties for growth, is cooperating with the 
Bishop in a plan to secure the services 
of an able minister, who will devote his 
entire time to Saint James, and to vis- 
iting in the three adjoining hospitals. 
They have accepted quite an increase in 
contributions towards the support of a 
resident minister. Summer congregations 
have been exceptionally fine. 

Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek, has re- 
organized its vested choir, with emphasis 
on building up a junior choir; the wo- 
man's Auxiliary is active; and during 
the summer the Church building was 
painted, both inside and outside. This 
latter has added much to the appearance 
of the Church building, as has also the 
shrubbery which the women of the 
Church planted last spring. Few con- 
gregations of its size have such splendid 
responses in the service, or better music. 
Congregational singing is exceptionaly 
good, and some good voices are in the 
choir. 



CHAPTERS IN DIOCESAN HISTORY 



The Rev. James B. Sill 

Diocesan Historiographer 

St. Francis Church, Rutherjordton 

As with other Churches of the diocese 
St. Francis Church suffered from the 
effects of the Civil War. From 1864 to 
1873 no regular services were held and 
the parish was cut off from its diocesen 
standing. It was readmitted in 1875. 
We find Rev. E. A. Osborne, rector of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, coming in 
1877 "to preach there once a month." 
being sent by Bishop Atkinson. Mr. 
Osborne was in deacon's orders. He re- 
ports in diocesan journal that he was to 
receive one-hundred dollars a year and 
that "Rev. Dr. Buel administers Holy 
Communion on the Sth Sunday in the 



month when it occurs. "Though the par- 
ish is very feeble, the services of the 
Church here are very well attended." 
He continued coming for a few years, 
but opening of the missions near Fletch- 
er evidently prevented his taking the 
long journey, for we find that from 1882 
to 1887 the parish was without regular 
services. Bishop Lyman visited the par- 
ish during these years. And in 1887 Mr. 
Osborne again takes charge, this time 
coming from Charlotte, being a dio- 
cesan missionary. He had been ordained 
priest while at Fletcher. He later be- 
came superintendent of the Thompson 
Orphanage at Charlotte, very much be- 
loved as such. Rev. Arthur W. Wrixon 
followed at Rutherfordton as missionary 
in charge 1889, continuing a few years. 



13 



DIOCESAN HISTORY— Concluded 

serving Shelby and Tryon also. There 
were not more than 10 or 12 communi- 
cants at the time. 

In 1892 we find Rev. Gerard W. 
Phelps having charge, while living at 
Shelby. He reports in 1893 "The work 
at St. Johns last year was much encour- 
aged by the help given by a party of la- 
dies from Wilmington — repainting, 
whitening, and varnishing doors and 
walls and chancel railing, and refitting 
and repairing lamps, and putting up the 
fence about the Church. But the roof 
of this Church is old and sadly needs new 
shingling." 

A brighter day was about to dawn for 
St. Johns. We read of Rev. Charles J. 
Wingate taking up the work, coming 
from Marion, where he had charge of the 
Church there. 

He reports in 1898 "congregations al- 
ways large. Col. Coxe is erecting a stone 



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TRINITY CHURCH, Asheville, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



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chapel for the use of the Mission." Com- 
municants reported 14. The new Church 
was completed in 1899, its valuation 
$7,000.00, and was consecrated on Ascen- 
sion Day, 1900 by Rt. Rev. J. M. Horn- 
er, being named St. Francis, and being 
built in memory of Col. Frank Coxe's 
parents, Francis S. Coxe and Jane Mc- 
Bee (Alexander) Coxe. 

The Jurisdiction of Asheville had been 
formed out of the diocese of North Caro- 
lina in 1895. Bishop Cheshire, of North 
Carolina Diocese served as bishop of the 
jurisdiction until the consecration of 
Bishop Horner as its missionary bishop 
in 1898. Among Communicants regis- 
tered at St. Francis in 1900 we find 
those of the families of Twitty, Thurs- 
ton, Sharp, Coxe, Justice, Hicks, Wal- 
drop and Haywood. The town's popula- 
tion was under 900. Col. Coxe's par- 
ents lived a short distance east of the 



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14 



town, having built their home in 1885, 
and it is interesting to record that it 
forms a part of the present Spindale 
Community house. There was no Spin- 
dale in those days. The Southern R. R. 
which came thru in 1890 and went on to 
Marion, had a flag station at Coxe's 
Crossing. The home of Col. Frank 
Coxe, who had come to Rutherfordton 
from Philadelphia, was what has been 
generally known as The Green River 
House, some ten miles from town. A 
Chapel called St. Joseph's, was built on 
the hill-side above the home. The donor 
of it was Mrs. R. M. Thurston, Mrs. 
Thurston was an aunt of Mrs. Cox who 
was of the Carson family, the original 
owners of the plantation on the Green 
River; and later, at a short distance be- 
yond the entrance to the home place, 
was built St. Andrew's Chapel for the 
negro workers, on the estate, and their 
families. 

Rev. A. de R. Meares, of the Marion 
Missions, served St. Francis for a time, 
and then clergy from Lincolnton served 
the Alission, it now having a status as an 
organized Mission. One from Lincoln- 
ton, later well known in the diocese, who 
served St. Francis, was Rev. John C. 
Seagle. Ordained a deacon in 1903, he 
was of the Seagle family, old residents 
of Henderson County, and had received 
training for the ministry, as had also his 
brother Nathan, at the Ravenscroft 
School, Asheville, a school for ones 
studying for the ministry. Rev. Nathan 
Seagle, as also John, were graduates of 
the Gen. Theolog. Seminary in New 
York. Nathan became rector of St. 
Stephen's Church, New York City, con- 
tinuing there throughout his ministry of 
50 years. 

The brighter day for the Church at 
Rutherfordton that began with the erec- 
tion of the new Church continued with 
the coming of Drs. Henry Morris and M. 
H. Biggs in 1906 for the purpose of open- 
ing a hospital. This was accomplished by 
taking over and adding to a building 
formerly occupied as a Military Insti- 
tute. By 1911 the present beautiful 
building was completed, the older one 



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DIOCESAN HISTORY— Continued 

being removed. These physicians and 
their families were of the Church and 
were active in its welfare, had come 
from the Philadelphia neighborhood, and 
the rectorship of St. Francis being va- 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

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RECTOR 



cant and at their suggestion, Rev. Fred- 
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became its rector. In the 1908 report 
to the diocese, St. Francis has again be- 
come a parish, Rev. F. D. Lobdell, the 
rector, communicants numbering twenty- 
nine. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

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Founded 1842 
Richard 3. Stone, President 

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BEACON BLANKETS 
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Churchman 



VOL. XXI 



APRIL, 1951 




3tffr--Hpiu (Etjoirl& ^aitrtwarg 
St, iMpr a (Efjurti^-ifctt&praottmUr 



No. 6 




TAf Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



GMjttrrljman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 

Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 

Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 

Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville, N. C. 

Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville. N. C. 




APOLOGY WITHOUT REGRETS 

THIS ISSUE OF THE HIGHLAND 
CHURCHMAN has somewhat of a dif- 
ferent character than the usual issue in 
that it has been set-up in part as a pre- 
convention issue; it has been mailed 
later in the month than usual in order 
to include convention matters. 

Quite noticeable is the space allotted 
to the proposed budget to be reviewed 
by the 29th annual convention for the 
fiscal year 1952. Do not be alarmed; 
this paper has not passed from the De- 
partment of Promotion to that of Fi- 
nance! Actually the proposed budget 
might well be included in the report of 
the Department of Missions, or, the 
Committee on the State of the Church, 
instead of the Department of Finance, 
for, it concerns much more than dollars 
and cents. The increases proposed are 
due to new churches, new clergy, new 
missionary activity, and, renewed life 
in the Diocese. The Executive Council 
and the Bishop is anxious that all 
churches study it immediately; this 
prior printing should give all delegates 
some time to consider it. Such study, 
and some prayer, should insure against 
last minute uncertainties which usually 
accompany convention reports that are 
passed out with the mimeo ink still wet. 

We have not included a Bishop's 
column this month. We hope to include 
his convention address in the May Is- 
sue. 



Dr. Boylston Green, Vice-Chancelloi} 
and President of the University of the! 
South to give convention address. 



GLEANINGS FROM APRIL 
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETING 

The Department of Christian Educa- 
tion has made advance this year in 
teacher training programs. The laity 
are being given opportunity to acquaint 
themselves with the new program of 
Christian Education in the Church. . . . 
The Department of Promotion is mak- 
ing plans for the Every Member Can- 
vass in the Fall. The Highland Church- 
man is undergoing changes in size, for- 
mat, content, and art layout — the re- 
vised version to be ready by Fall. . . . 
There is an agent for the Church Fire 
Insurance Corporation resident in North 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL CONVENTION 

St. James Church, Hendersonville, North Carolina 

Wednesday and Thursday, May 9-10, 1951 

First Day, Wednesday, May 9th 

10:30 A. M— Holy Communion 

11:15 A. M. — Organization of Convention 

Annual Address of the Bishop of the Diocese 
Apppintment of Committees 
Reports of Officers 
1:00 P. M. — Luncheon in the Parish House 
2:30 P. M.— Convention Called to Order 

Reports of Officers, Departments, Committees 
Nominations of those to be elected by ballots; 

elections to be held on the Second Day 
Resolutions and Miscellaneous Business 
5:00 P. M.— Adjournment 
6:00 P. M— Dinner at Parish House 
8:00 P. M. — Evening Service in the Church 

Address by Dr. Boylston Green, President and Vice-Chancellor, 
University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 
Second Day, Thursday, May 10th 
7:30 A. M. — Holy Communion 
9:30 A. M— Morning Prayer 
10:15 A. M.— Convention Called to Order 

Supplementary Report of Committee on Credentials 
Reading and Approving of Minutes 
Adoption of Budget 
Elections 

Report of Special Committees of this Convention 
Report of Committees on Constitution and Canons 
Report of Tellers on Results of Elections 
Report of Committee on Unfinished Business 
1:00 P. M. — Adjournment 
1:15 P. M. — Luncheon in Parish House 



Carolina now. . . . The Womans All THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 

Saints Offering amounted to over $600. HEAD HONORED 

. . . Some neophyte mistook the Bish- 
op's Staff case for a zither case. . . . Mr. M. D. Whisnant, superintendent 
The Bishop reported that three Semi- °f Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, 
nary graduates will become resident in was made president of the Southeastern 
the Diocese this summer pending their Conference of Workers in Homes for 
graduation. They will be placed in Children, at a recent meeting of that or- 
charge of three separate mission fields, ganization held in Charlotte. The Con- 
The Bishop also reported, that accord- ference report listed 95 delegates regis- 
ing to present schedule, within two tered representing 31 institutions in 
years there should not be a Church in Southeast America. Thompson Or- 
the diocese without regular and resident phanage was host to a tea given dele- 
clergy. . . . Mr. Redwood was not sur- gates at the close of the three-day con- 
prised that so few Churches had for- ference. Thompson is an official insti- 
warded their first quarterly payments tution of the Carolina Dioceses of the 
on apportionment and assessment. Episcopal Church. 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1952 GENERAL CHURCH AND MISSION FUND 

I National Church Program 12,500.00 

II Provincial Church Dues Province of Sewanee 675.00 

III Diocesan Work 

A — Missions and Church Extension 

(1951 Total) Stipend Travel Pension Total 

Bat Cave (800) 800.00 800.00 

Black Mountain (1,150) 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Boone (1,380) 1,200.00 180.00 1,380.00 

Canton (621) 480.00 72.00 552.00 

Craggy (1,350) 1,000.00 200.00 150.00 1,350.00 

Franklin St. Agnes (1,542).-.. 1,080.00 300.00 162.00 1,542.00 

Franklin St. Cyprian (800).... 800.00 ( 3QQQQ 2 300 00 

Murphy (1,200) 1,200.00 ( ' ' 

Lincolnton (621) 480.00 72.00 552.00 

Rfdtn., St. Gabriel (2,565)...... 1,890.00 150.00 284.00 2,324.00 

VaUe Crucis (2,270) 1,800.00 200.00 270.00 2,270.00 

Waynesville (747) 580.00 87.00 667.00 

West Asheville 

St. George (New) 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Asheville, St. Matthias (N).... 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Asheville, Grace (New) 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Burke Co. Missions (New).. .... 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Bessemer City (New) 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Wilkesboro (New) 1,000.00 150.00 1,150.00 

Archdeacon Kennedy 150.00 150.00 

Deaf Work — Rev. Jas. L. 

Fortune (New) 100.00 100.00 

UTO Workers 6,300.00 200.00 6,500.00 

Department Expense 150.00 

Total— Department of Missions (23,846) 28,737.00 

B — Department of Christian Social Relations > 100.00 
C — Department of Christian Education 

Schools and Colleges 

University of the South (500) 500.00 

St. Mary's School (250) _.. 250.00 

Appalachian School (500) 500.00 

Patterson School (1,000) 1,000.00 

Chapel HiU (200) 200.00 

Kanuga Conferences (100)—-. 100.00 

Teachers Training Scholar- 
ship (50) 50.00 2,600.00 

Commission Work 

Children's Commission (240).. 215.00 

Youth Commission (100) 100.00 

Schools & Colleges Expense (25) 25.00 

Adult Commission (25) 50.00 390.00 

Departmental Expense 60.00 

Total — Department of Christian Education (3,050) ... 3,050.00 

D — Department of Promotion 

Highland Churchman (900)-. 900.00 

Visual Aid (100) 100.00 

Promotional Activity (100). 100.00 

Departmental Expense (100). .. 100.00 

Total — Department of Promotion (1200)-— _._ 1,200.00 

Total — General Church and Mission Fund Budget 46,262.00 

CREDITS 

National Council for UTO Workers ($5,000) 6,000.00 

Holt Fund (2,000) 2,000.00 

Embury Fund (900) _ 900.00 

Reserve (6,000) 6,000.00 

Woman Auxiliary (900) 900.00 

Bishop Matthews (800) 800.00 16,600.00 

Apportion to Parishes and Missions 29% (24,947— 26% 29,662.00 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1952 
DIOCESAN EXPENSE FUND 
I — Diocesan Officers 
A — Bishop 

Salary (6,000) 6,000.00 

Pension Premium (1,050) 1,050.00 

Secretary (1,040) 1,040.00 

Travel & Office (1,360) 1,360.00 



B — Convention Secretary 

Salary (250) 

Pension Premium (37.50). 

C — Treasurer 

Audit and Expense (200) 



II— Property Upkeep 

Bishop's House (250) 

,■„_■-•. Insurance on Home (75) 

Insurance Schoenberger Hall (50) — 
Replacement of Bishop's Car (300). 



Ill — Conventions 
A — Diocesan 

Printing Journal (600) 

B — Provincial 

Expenses of Delegates (100) 

C — General 

. ,-..; Assessment (312) 

Expenses of Deputies (600) 

IV— Miscellaneous, Committees, Etc., (225). 



250.00 
37.50 



200.00 



250.00 
75.00 
50.00 

300.00 



600.00 

100.00 

250.00 
600.00 
225.00 



Total Diocesan Expense Fund (12,450) — — 

CREDITS 

Endowment Fund Income (2,000) .: 2,000.00 

Ravenscroft Income (1200) ....__ 1,300.00 



9,450.00 

287.50 

200.00 
9,937.50 

675.00 



Assess Parishes and Missions 9% (9,250—10%). 



1,550.00 
225.00 

12,387.50 

3,300.00 
9,087.50 



SIGNS OF THE TIMES 

Some statistics from the Missionary 
District of North Texas, which do, lit- 
erally speak for themselves: 

1940 1950 

Baptisms 134 293 

Confirmations 116 408 

Baptized Persons __ 2,919 5,648 

Communicants 2,297 3,788 

Church School 783 1,816 

Receipts £38,722 $440,331 

Missions quota $ 2,300 $ 8,029 



ROGATIONTIDE 

April 29 and 30, May 1 and 2, days 
preceding Ascension Day, are observed 
widely in the Episcopal Church as Ro- 
gation Days. The origin of the cus- 
tom has been traced to Mamertus, 
Bishop of Vienne (460) who appointed 
annual Litanies on these days. Litan- 



ies had been used for the purpose of 
praying for rain, or for fair weather, 
but on the occasion of some calamities 
in his diocese, Mamertus appointed Li- 
tanies or Rogations to be observed 
yearly before the Feast of the Ascen- 
sion. These were soon called "The 
Rogation Days" and the observance 
was soon received throughout Gaul and 
from there passed to the Anglo-Saxon 
Church. Before the day of large cities, 
the Litany was said or sung as the peo- 
ple marched in procession around the 
boundaries of the parish, stopping at 
various places to offer prayers for seed- 
time and harvest. In this country the 
outdoor procession continued in some 
places, mostly rural, but special pray- 
ers for "a fruitful season," and "bless- 
ing upon this land" are used in all Epis- 
copal Churches at this time. 



ASSESSMENT PROPOSED APPORTIONMENT 

1951 1952 1951 1952 

444.00 456.00 Asheville, St. Mary's „„. 1,140.00 1,464.00 

72.00 60.00 Asheville, St. Matthias 190.00 204.00 

1,620.00 1,548.00 Asheville, Trinity 4,200.00 4,980.00 

1,880.00 1,080.00 Biltmore, All Souls 3,090.00 3,480.00 

228.00 204.00 Brevard, St. Philips' 595.00 660.00 

120.00 120.00 Flat Rock, St. John's 300.00 372.00 

432.00 420.00 Fletcher, Calvary 1,110.00 1,344.00 

420.00 480.00 Gastonia, St. Mark's 1,090.00 1,524.00 

432.00 420.00 Henderson ville, St. James' 1,110.00 1,380.00 

396.00 456.00 Hickory, Ascension 1,030.00 1,476.00 

288.00 288.00 Lenoir, St. James' 745.00 912.00 

108.00 132.00 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 290.00 420.00 

240.00 240.00 Marion, St. John's 625.00 780.00 

624.00 600.00 Morganton, Grace _ 1,615.00 1,944.00 

468.00 432.00 Rutherfordton, St. Francis 1,220.00 1,392.00 

852.00 828.00 Tryon, Holy Cross 2,215.00 2,664.00 

192.00 228.00 Waynesville, Grace 480.00 720.00 

96.00 84.00 Wilkesboro, St. aul's . 255.00 288.00 

8,220.00 8,076.00 TOTAL Parishes .:..: .__.._ _ 21,300.00 26,004.00 

12.00 12.00 Andrews, Chapel of the Holy Comforter 25.00 25.00 

36.00 36.00 Arden, Christ School 95.00 108.00 

48.00 36.00 Asheville (Chunn's Cove) St. Luke's.- 120.00 96.00 

144.00 144.00 Asheville (Craggy) The Redeemer.... 285.00 285.00 

36.00 24.00 AsheviUe (Haw Creek) Trinity Chapel 100.00 84.00 

24.00 36.00 Asheville (Grace) _ 50.00 75.00 

12.00 24.00 West Asheville, St. George. 25.00 50.00 

36.00 72.00 Bat Cave, Transfiguration 90.00 240.00 

12.00 12.00 Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 25.00 25.00 

72.00 96.00 Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 195.00 300.00 

96.00 72.00 Black Mountain, St. James' 255.00 216.00 

120.00 120.00 Blowing Rock, St. Mary's 305.00 300.00 

60.00 60.00 Boone, St. Luke's .,.._ 150.00 108.00 

12.00 12.00 Burke County, St. Paul's 25.00 25.00 

96.00 96.00 Canton, St. Andrew's _ 250.00 240.00 

12.00 12.00 Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 25.00 25.00 

24.00 36.00 Edneyville, St. Paul's 75.00 108.00 

108.00 108.00 Franklin, St. Agnes 275.00 348.00 

12.00 12.00 Franklin, St. Cyprian's 25.00 25.00 

96.00 96.00 Highlands, Incarnation 235.00 312.00 

24.00 24.00 High Shoals, St. John's 60.00 60.00 

12.00 12.00 Hot Springs, St. John's 30.00 36.00 

12.00 12.00 Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 25.00 25.00 

12.00 12.00 Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 25.00 25.00 

24.00 24.00 Lincolnton, Our Saviour _ 45.00 48.00 

12.00 12.00 Morganton, St. Mary's 30.00 36.00 

12.00 12.00 Morganton, St. Stephen's 25.00 25.00 

72.00 84.00 Murphy, Messiah 185.00 288.00 

12.00 Murphy, St. Barnabas 25.00 

36.00 24.00 Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 80.00 60.00 

24.00 24.00 Saluda, Transfiguration 65.00 84.00 

132.00 156.00 Shelby, The Redeemer __._ 340.00 480.00 

24.00 24.00 Sylva, St. John's 60.00 60.00 

84.00 96.00 Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 210.00 288.00 



1,536.00 1,644.00 TOTAL— Organized Missions 3,810.00 4,535.00 

12.00 12.00 Avery Co., Linville, All Saints..... _ 25.00 25.00 

12.00 Caldwell County, Blackstone 25.00 

12.00 12.00 Henderson Co., St. John the Baptist 25.00 25.00 

12.00 12.00 Jackson Co., Cashiers, Good Shepherd 25.00 25.00 

12.00 Little Switzerland, Resurrection 

18.00 18.00 Penland, Good Shepherd 50.00 60.00 

12.00 12.00 Polk Co., Good Shepherd __ 25.00 25.00 



66.00 90.00 TOTAL — Unorganized Missions 150.00 185.00 

9,822.00 9,810.00 TOTAL — DIOCESE ...25,260.00 30,724.00 

6 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Rev. Robert B. Campbell. Chm. 

The department of Christian Educa- 
tion in the diocese functions chiefly 
through its four commissions: The 
Children's Commission, with The Rev. 
Richard Lee, of Lincolnton, Chairman; 
the Youth Commission, the Rev. Mark 
Jenkins, Chairman; the Schools and 
College Commission, the Rev. James P. 
Burke, Chairman; the Adult Commis- 
sion, Mrs. Francis Field, Chairman. 

The following Teacher Training In- 
stitutes are being held under the direc- 
tion of the Children's Commission: As- 
cension Hickory, April 29th, Trinity, 
Asheville, April 30th, St. Agnes, Frank- 
lin May 1st. Each institute will start 
at 7:30 p.m. 

The date for the Diocesan Camp, 
under the supervision of the Youth 
Commission, has been set for the third 
week in June. We do hope that many 
of the young people of the Diocese will 
enjoy this splendid camp at Patterson 
School, again, this year. 

Twenty laymen, ten men and ten wo- 
men, throughout the diocese have been 
invited to a conference of Christian Ed- 
ucation, patterned on the Clergy Con- 
ference in Washington. This confer- 
ence for the laymen will be held at Se- 
wanee, Tennessee, July 29th-July 1st, 
and will be led by Dr. Heuss, of the 
National Council. It will afford our 
Diocese a fine opportunity to know 
more thoroughly, even, than now, the 
educational program of our general 
church. These twenty laymen will be 
available for talks and visits to give 
parishes the benefit of the conference. 

Our educational program is designed 
for every member of the family. The 
New Curriculum is concerned not soi 
much with individuals as with fam- 
ilies. Indeed, it begins with special in- 
structions in Christian Marriage, Chris- 
tian home building, preparing of par-t 
ents and sponsors for baptism, and thisi 
has been called "Christian Pediatrics," 
for the care of our "tiniest" souls. 

The Schools and College Commission 



is prepared to secure for those in ser- 
vice Service Crosses, and prayer books 
of special army and navy types, as in 
World War II, for our boys and girls 
in the service of our country. How- 
ever, the commission points out that 
these can be secured by the rector of 
any parish, by writing The Rev. James 
P. Burke, Hendersonville, for further 
information. 

The Department is prepared to help 
a few with scholarships to Kanuga 
Adult Conference for the purpose of 
Training in Teaching in Sunday Schools. 
The Department has #50 available for 
this purpose. Mrs. Field, chairman of 
the adult commission, would like to 
have information from every parish 
concerning adult work in matters of 
Christian Education: What is being 
done now, and what literature is being 
used. 



A PRAYER FOR PEACE 

O God, Father of us all, we pray for 
power to bring the peace on earth. Amid 
the confusions and cruelties of today, 
help us to draw close to Thee in quiet- 
ness so that we may understand the 
failings within us that create bitterness 
and war. Deliver us from being satis- 
fied with ourselves, and keep us from 
suspicion, prejudice, and hate. Inspire 
the leaders of all nations, especially our 
President and his advisors, with a vis- 
ion of thy Kingdom of brotherhood. Be 
with the men and women serving in the 
armed forces. Comfort those who are 
frightened, homesick, or wounded. 
Strengthen the doctors, nurses, and 
chaplains who seek to help them. We 
pray for our enemies in their griefs and 
hardships. Fill them and us with thy 
spirit of tenderness and love. Unite us 
all in looking forward to that day when 
we shall be changed from foes to friends, 
working together to serve thee and to 
build thy peace in all the world. We 
ask it in the name of him who came 
to bring men peace, thy Son, Jesus 
Christ our Lord. AMEN. 

— from St. Agnes', Franklin, N. C, and 
St. George's, N. Y. C. 



TEACHER TRAINING CONFERENCES 

We are happy to announce that ar- 
rangements have been made to have the 
Rev. Frank H. Craighill, Rector of Bru- 
ton Parish, Williamsburg, Virginia, 
speak at all three district meetings of 
our Diocesan Teacher's Training Course 
to be held on Sunday, April 29th, at 
The Church of The Ascension, Hick- 
ory, Monday, April 30th, at Trinity, 
Asheville, and on May 1st at St. Agnes' 
Church, Franklin. All meetings com- 
mence at 7:30. p.m. 

The Rev. Mr. Craighill is widely rec- 
ognized as an authority on Religious 
education. He will tell us of the cur- 
riculum, now being prepared by the Na- 
tional Church, the Inter-Curriculum 
now being so generally adopted, not 
only, throughout our own Diocese, but 
throughout the Church at large, and 
also give us counsel and advice in the 
art of teaching. An opportunity to en- 
joy an interchange of opinions will be 
provided at the close of his address. 

We have provided these three district 
meetings in order to make it possible for 
all church school teachers, and all who 
are truly interested in the religious ed- 
ucation of our youth to be present, 
without finding it a hardship to attend. 
' To properly establish Religious Ed- 
ucation throughout the Diocese de- 
mands cooperation and we are counting 
upon the support and loyalty of every 
parish' and mission.' 

"Faithfully" yours, 
V; /RICHARD J, LEE, 
. ^'Chairman, Children's Commission. 



CONVOCATION OF ASHEVILLE 
LENTEN OFFERING 
PRESENTATION SERVICES 

On Saturday, April 7th, Bishop Hen- 
ry and the Dean of the Convocation, 
the Rev. Mark Jenkins, went to Cher- 
okee for the Children's Lenten Offering 
Service in the western section of the 
Convocation. 

The beautiful little Chapel of St. 
Francis of Assisi was packed to the 
doors. The Dean read trre Service and 
Bishop Henry preached. After the 



Service everyone gathered at the pic- 
nic house next to the Church for re- 
freshments. 

On Sunday afternoon, April 8th, in 
All Souls' Church, Biltmore, more than 
350 children of the Asheville and east- 
ern parfof the Convocation gathered to 
present their Lenten Offering. Father 
Sill acte.d as host, since the Rector of 
All Souls' was away on vacation. The 
Rev. Robert McCloskey of Canton read 
the Service and the Dean of the Convo- 
cation, the Rev. Mark Jenkins, preached 
the sermon. All went to the Parish 
House for refreshments after the Ser- 
vice. 

At this writing the total of the offer- 
ing for the Convocation has not been 
received but it is expected to be more 
than $900.00. The children are to be 
congratulated on their offering and 
their participation in these Services. 

-G.M.J. 



URGES CHURCHES TO ADVERTISE 
IN LOCAL NEWSPAPERS 

Binghampton, N, Y. — To encourage 
and help parish churches to make ef- 
fective use of advertising in their local 
newspapers, Kendall R. Jones, whose 
business name is Church Publicity Ser- 
vice, Binghamton, has prepared a mat 
service with text and pictures, planned 
to bring people to Church services, re- 
vitalize present members., build prestige 
for- the Church, and- attract newcomers. 
- - Mr.- -Jones -is a professional advertis- 
ing man, and a layman of the -Episco- 
pal Church. He is convinced that ad- 
vertising in the local newspapers is one 
of the best media for productive Church 
publicity and is urging churches every- 
where to use it. 



PARISH SUBSCRIBES TO 
LOCAL NEWSPAPER FOR 
ITS SERVICE MEN 

.Philadelphia — Calvary Episcopal 
Church, Germantown, is sending sub- 
scriptions to .a Philadelphia daily news- 
paper .to men. from the. parish, who are 
in the Armed Forces. 



8 






1951 KANUGA CONFERENCES 



The Kanuga Conferences, again this 
year, offer to youngsters and adults 
throughout the South the wonderful op- 
portunity for "learning and playing" 
that has made Kanuga so popular 
among Churchmen young and old. Lo- 
cated on beautiful Kanuga Lake, near 
Hendersonville, N. C, high atop the 
Blue Ridge Mountains, Kanuga has 
drawn capacity crowds to its two week 
camps and conferences for all ages. The 
experience and ability of the Directors 
and Faculty members — and the de- 
lightfully cool and refreshing mountain 
air — has made Kanuga outstanding 
as an Episcopal Conference Center. 

For the youngsters there are three 
camps — each one loaded with fun! 
Girls 9 and 10 years old will attend the 
Midget Camp, June 10 to June 23. The 
Girls' Camp is for girls 11 and 12 years 
old and meets June 24 to July 7. Boys 
10 to 12 years old will assemble in the 
Cub Camp, July 8 to July 21. 

Teen-agers are accommodated at three 
conferences. The Junior Conference, 
which convenes June 23 and closes 
July 6, is for boys and girls 13 and 14 
years old. The Rev. Allen Clarkson 
of Augusta, Ga.. will direct this confer- 
ence. The Young People's Conference, 
for the IS to 17 age group, will meet 
June 9 to June 22. The Director will 
be the .Rev. Robert Crandall of Char- 
lotte, N. C. College Conference, under 
the direction of the Rev. Capers Sat- 
terlee, will meet July 7 to July 20. Col- 
lege students and high school graduates 
planning to enter college in the fall are 
eligible. 

The first conference for adults is the 
Retreat for Women, June 4 to June 7. 
These are a few quiet days spent in si- 
lence, a time of renewal and of wor- 
ships a time of deep awareness of the 
Presence of God. - : - 

The Adult-Clergy Conference under 
tb.e direction of Bishop Thomas N. 
Carruthers of South Carolina, convenes 
July 7 to July 20. Those attending last 



year's conference declared it to be a 
wonderful experience and can look for- 
ward to an even better meeting this 
year. The work of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary will be taught in two classes, one 
for beginners and one for advanced 
workers. Mrs. Francis O. Clarkson of 
Charlotte, N. C, and Mrs. Edward G. 
Lasar of St. Louis, Mo., both members 
of the National Board, will each teach 
one week of the conferences. Other 
courses will be taught by Dr. George 
Taylor, the Rev. Alfred Loring-Clark, 
the Rev. Leland Henry, Director of So- 
cial Relations in the Diocese of New 
York, and other outstanding Church- 
men. 

Kanuga Camp for Boys, a recrea- 
tional camp within a Christian atmos- 
phere, will be open again this year. Mr. 
Freeman Self, a former Scout Execu- 
tive and a man with 20 years camping 
experience, will have charge of this 
camp. He knows boys and knows 
camping and will have an attractive well 
balanced program of sports, crafts and 
mountain adventure. The Boys Camp 
will open July 29 and rv.i until August 
25. Boys may come for two weeks 
only, or for the full month. The age 
limit for this camp is 9 to 14. 

From July 23 until the end of August, 
Kanuga will be operated as a Guest 
Resort, offering "the Perfect Family 
Vacation." Every effort is made to 
provide the opportunity and program 
for real family recreation in the atmos- 
phere of Christian family living. Re- 
creation includes swimming, boating, 
fishing, hiking, square dancing, plays, 
parties, and plenty of good old-fash- 
ioned fun. Accommodations include 
rooms in the Inn or Annex, and Cot- 
tages — ideal for family groups. All 
the delicious meals are served family 
style in the. Inn. 

A bulletin giving detailed informa- 
tion on all the Kanuga activities can be 
secured from Willard P. Verduin, Mgr., 
Kanuga Conferences, Hendersonville, 
North- Carolina. .■•■'•. 



LAYMEN OF WESTERN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

The bulletin of the laymen's move- 
ment in the Diocese, "Keystone Com- 
ments," is under new management; Mr. 
Girard E. Haven, 325 Country Club 
Road, Asheville, is the new publisher- 
editor. 

Mr. Haven reports the naming of a 
new secretary of the Presiding Bishop's 
Committee on Laymen's Work at 281 
4th Avenue, N. Y. C. 



The Laymen of the Province of Se- 
wanee will meet for their provincial 
meeting at the University of the South, 
June 14 through June 17. It is hoped 
that a good delegation will attend from 
this Diocese. Total cost for room and 
board for the three day conference is 
only $12.00. 



The Men's Clubs of Trinity, Ashe- 
ville, and Holy Cross, Tryon, seem to 
be carrying on a worthwhile and active 
program. On April 4, the Rev. Robert 
Lee Bast of Baltimore addressed the 
Trinity men on "Archbishop Crammer." 
On March 20, Dr. W. L. Pugh former- 
ly professor of English at Wofford Col- 
lege, gave a lecture to the Holy Cross 
men on "Transportation: Mechanical, 
Linguistic, and Spiritual." 



NEW SECRETARY FOR 
LAYMENS WORK 

Presiding Bishop Henry Knox Sher- 
rill and Mr. Harvey S. Firestone, Jr., 
announce the appointment of the Rev. 
Clarence R. Haden, Jr., as Executive 
Director of the Presiding Bishop's Com- 
mittee on Laymen's Work, succeeding 
the Rev. Arnold M. Lewis, now Dean 
of the Cathedral in Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida. 

Mr. Haden has been rector of St. 
Philip's Church, Durham, North Caro- 
lina, since 1945. During his rectorage 
there he built a $125,000 parish hall, 
the entire cost of which is pledged and 
is now being paid. 

Mr. Haden is 40 years old, born in 



Fort Worth, Texas. He was educated 
in the public schools of Fort Worth and 
at Baylor University, Waco, Texas. He 
attended Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City,_ 1932-1934; Seabury- 
Western Theological Seminary, for his 
S. T. B. degree in 1936. He is married 
and has one daughter. 

He was ordained in Evanston, Illi- 
nois, in 1936, and began his ministry at 
St. John's Church, Fort Worth, the 
same year. He served as minister in 
charge, St. Barnabas' Church, Denton, 
Texas, and St. Paul's Church, Gains- 
ville, Texas, in 1936 and 1937, then be- 
came rector of St. John's, Corsicana, 
Texas, where he remained for four 
years. His next parish was St. Mat- 
thew's, Houma, Louisiana, for two 
years, then he became rector of St. 
Paul's, New Orleans, remaining there 
for two years, until he accepted the call 
from St. Philip's Durham. 

Mr. Haden's diocesan activities in- 
cluded chairmanship of the Department 
of Missions, diocese of Dallas; execu- 
tive council; examining chaplain. In 
the Diocese of Louisiana, he was a 
member of the Board of Managers, 
Gaudet Normal and Industrial School; 
chairman, Department of Christian Ed- 
ucation; member of executive council. 
In the diocese of North Carolina, he 
was an examining chaplain, chairman 
of the department of Christian Educa- 
tion, a member of the Standing Com- 
mittee, member of the Board of Trus- 
tees, St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, 
North Carolina, and clerical deputy to 
General Conventions, diocese of Dallas, 
1940, and diocese of North Carolina, 
1949. 

He has written for various Church 
papers. Before entering the ministry he 
worked in the Purchasing and Account- 
ing Departments of Armour & Com- 
pany at Fort Worth, and in the Sales 
and Advertising Departments of the 
Pangburn Candy Company, also of 
Fort Worth. 

Mr. Haden expects to begin his new 
work in New York on May 1. 



10 



YOUTH NEWS 

Peggy Jean Horton, Box 139. Hickory 

Diocesan Youth Camp 

It is not too early to make plans for 
the biggest week of the summer, the 
week at Youth Camp at Patterson 
School in Happy Valley — the date is 
June 17 to June 23. The Rev. G. Mark 
Jenkins is director of the Camp this 
year; the Bishop of the Diocese will 
lead a stellar faculty. In your consid- 
erations, don't forget the good food at 
Patterson, and the fun and fellowship. 
More details will follow later. 



Mighty Box — Mighty Works 

The Lenten Mite Boxes have been 
split open — our pennies, nickels, and 
dimes have been counted — but is this 
enough? What are we doing to really 
help someone? What about strangers 
and the friendless — are we being friends 
to them? The Young People of Ascen- 
sion, Hickory, have adopted a plan 
whereby each month they find and help 
a needy family in their community. It 
would be a fine project for every youth 
group in the Diocese. Our mite boxes 
may be mighty — but are they enough? 



EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS OF 
THE G. I. BILL terminate for veter- 
ans of World War II who are not en- 
rolled in school on July 25, 1951. In 
expectation that a number of veterans 
will plan to enter summer terms this 
year, a^d pecause of a demand among 
present students for an accelerated pro- 
gram, the University of the South will 
open a summer school for young men 
and women on June 13. Dr. Gaston 
S. Bruton will serve as dean for the ses- 
sion which begins on June 13, two days 
after commencement, and continues 
through August 21. Summer school 
students will be able to attend all eight 
concerts of the famous Cumberland 
Forest Festival, called by TIME maga- 
zine, "the Tanglewood of the South." 
For catalogue write Dean of Summer 
School, Sewanee, Tennessee. 



The Young Churchman's Club of 
CALVARY CHURCH, FLETCHER, 

has taken several new projects on its 
calendar since Uncle Sam has invited so 
many to be on his payroll. With eight 
members in the Army and Navy, one 
in the WAC, and that many more away 
at college this winter, the membership is 
reduced in numbers — but not in ac- 
tivities. 

Each month groups meet in homes to 
make cookies and candy to send to the 
ones away in the armed forces. Once 
each month a mimeographed letter goes 
out to each one away from home-base, 
giving them the news of the Parish and 
the Young Churchmen. One of our 
boys in the Army now stationed in Eng- 
land has written us that he has organ- 
ized a Young Churchman's Club in his 
outfit to which all Episcopalians be- 
long. Others, including local English 
young Churchmen, are invited to all 
meetings. They report increased in- 
terest with each meeting. 

On April 15th we, with young people 
throughout the Church, met at our 
home Altar for our Corporate Commun- 
ion, after which we met in the Parish 
House for breakfast and election of of- 
ficers for the coming year. 

We sponsored a study class on Church 
History each Sunday Evening during 
Lent. The whole congregation of Cal- 
vary Parish was invited to these classes 
conducted by the Rector. They proved 
so interesting and helpful that they will 
be continued the second Sunday Eve- 
ning of each month. 

— G. M. J. 



TOO MANY FOUR-WHEELERS 
IN BRITISH CHURCH 

Whaplode, England — There are too 
many four-wheelers in the Church of 
England today, the Rev. W. T. Arm- 
strong, vicar of the parish here, de- 
clared in an interview. "They come 
in a pram to be christened, in a taxi to 
be married, and in a hearse to be bur- 
ied," adding that he imagined the same 
situation prevailed in other churches 
around the world. 



11 



WOMANS AUXILIARY 

Lanthe Rush Campbell 



WORSHIP: 

A PRAYER 

By St. Francis of Assisi 
"Lord make me an instrument of Thy 

Peace! 
Where there is hatred ... let me sow 

love 
Where there is injury . . . pardon 
Where there is doubt . . . faith 
Where there is despair . . . hope 



Where there is sadness 



joy! 



Divine Master, grant that I may not 

so much seek 
To be consoled ... as to console 
To be understood ... as to understand 
To be loved ... as to love, for 
It is in giving, . . . that we receive. 
It is in pardoning . . . that we are par- 
doned 
It is in dying . . . that we are born to 
eternal life." 

WOMEN AT KANUGA 

THE ANNUAL MEETING of the 
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY will be held 
at Kanuga on June 7, 8. Plan to at- 
tend. It will be a real pleasure to meet 
the Verduins' and to pledge them our 
continued support in making Kanuga 
the outstanding conference center in the 
South. THE RETREAT FOR WO- 
MEN will be held from June 4 to June 
7. The Rev. Ray Holder, Christ 
Church, Raleigh, will conduct the re- 
treat this year. 
DISTRICT MEETINGS 

District meetings were held from April 
17 through April 27 at Tryon, Waynes- 
ville, Asheville, Lenoir, and Fletcher for 
the several districts. The offerings will 
be given to Kanuga for the repair and 
furnishing of a cottage there. 
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL RELATIONS 

"Does your Auxiliary think' of Chris- 
tian Social Relations as welfare work? 
Miss Stabler reports that some' Church- 
es do, but, more and more of our 
Churches' are thinking in terms of so- 
cial action. Here are a few fields and 
areas of social action in which we can 
participate: (1) May" 4th— May' Fel- 



lowship Day, sponsored by the Dep't. 
of Church " men of the National 
Council. This is a splendid way for 
Church Women from all denominations 
to get together, think together, and give 
towards some common cause together. 
(2) Gifts t<> missionaries. (3) The 
Problem of food for India. (4) The 
Study of the Covenant on Human 
Rights of the U. N. 



United Thank Offering: 

December 31, 1947 £657,910.33 

December 31, 1950 $802,540.93 



YOUTH WORK 

Does your Auxiliary keep in touch 
with your young people? Our youth 
are our most valuable asset. Here are 
a few suggestions: 

1. Study the needs of the youth in 
your church. 

2. Make them feel a part of your 
church's life. 

3. Give scholarships to Diocesan 
Camp and Kanuga. 



HERE AND THERE WITH 
THE BRANCHES: 

TRINITY, ASHEVILLE: The Aux- 
iliary gave #50 to, the Orthopedic Hos- 
pital towards the .purchase of a wheel 
chair. Mr. Willard Verduin, Mgr., 
spoke to the April meeting cc:\jerhing 
Kanuga. The Women of St. Angela's 
group donned overalls and painted a 
Church School room. St. Helena's 
group is selling' tickets to the N. C. 
Symphony Concert Series. 

ST JAMES, HENDERSONVILLE, 
Auxiliary reported an excellent U.T.O. 
The Bishop addressed the March meet- 
ing. 

ASCENSION, HICKORY, Auxiliary 
arranged a meeting at which Miss Ven- 
itia Cox, St. Hilda's School, Wuchah, 
China, spoke to the entire parish (men 
included). Miss Cox has been "loaned" 
to the Student Volunteer Movement by 
the National Council. 



12 



MEDIEVAL MYSTERY PLAYS STAGED 



The Womans Auxiliary of St. Mary's 
Church, Asheville, sponsored a notable 
presentation of three medieval mystery 
plays at the parish Church in Easter 
Week. St. Mary's is to be commended 
for presenting such authentic drama in 
the fashion and manner in which it was 
done, and, originally intended. The 
three plays were titled, "Betrayal of 
Christ," "Resurrection of Christ," and 
"The Journey to Emmaus." 

The Betrayal of Christ is one of 
forty-two "N. Towne Plays" first pub- 
lished in folio form in 1468. Robert 
Schenkkan of the University of North 
Carolina put into modern English — 
specially for St. Mary's — the archaic di- 
alect in which this play was written. 

The Resurrection of Christ is from 
the Wakefield Cycle, sometimes called 
the Towneley Mysteries. (Kai Jurgen- 
son and Robert Schenkkan made the 
modern version of the play). The com- 
plete series includes thirtv plays, from 
THE CREATION to THE JUDG- 
MENT. This English Cycle, probably 
14th Century, contains some of the fin- 
est earlv religious dramas. THE RE- 
SURRECTION OF CHRIST is strong 
in rising dramatic action and in the 
skilled use of humor to relieve tension. 
To such plays Shakespeare, who must 
have seen them as a child, probably 
owed his great comic scenes. 

The Journey to Emmaus was being 
performed in Europe as early as the 
1 100's. Though it was performed in 
England too, we have no English texts. 
Francis Bliss made this translation, from 
a Latin text found at the Abbey St. 
Benoit-sur-Loire. 

The players and choristers in the 
drama were recruited from St. Mary's 
parish and friends. Costumes were 
specially designed by Robert- Patterson. 
Staging was done by laymen in the Par- 
ish. James Dendy, Organist and Choir- 
master at Grace Church, Hinsdale, Illi- 
nois, and staff member of the leading 
organ magazine THE DIAPASON, 



composed the music for the production 
and was present for the production, 
coming from Illinois for the occasion. 
The music — ■ modern in concept but 
preserving medieval style — was based 
upon two early plainsong tunes. 



MYSTERY PLAYS 

If the medieval man was less likely 
than the modern one to have a Bible in 
his home, he was perhaps no less famil- 
iar with its message. For carvings of 
Scriptural events and people made his 
parish church or city cathedral a Bible 
in stone, while glowing glass filled its 
windows with colored illustrations. Then 
to make instruction still more vivid, the 
Church developed plays based on the 
Scriptures. f.n later medieval times, 
craftsmen of the guilds produced these 
dramas. Hence came the name of Mys- 
tery Plays — the Old French word for 
a craft was misterie (from Latin minis- 
terium, an occupation). 

The unknown playwrights wrote with 
great zest for pace, action and charact- 
er. Their direct and simple work charms 
us as more sophisticated drama some- 
times fails to do. Practical earthy 
touches in the midst of reverence com- 
bine the comic with the devotional. 

The players themselves must have 
enhanced this delightful double effect. 
Not professional actors but "horny- 
handed men of toil" like those giving 
the play in A MIDSUMMER 
NIGHT'S DREAM, they still threw 
themselves into their parts — undoubt- 
edly with many suggestions for new 
lines and "business." Typically the 
medieval man felt it an honor to take 
part in these dramas, played in the very 
chancel, and his acting counted as a 
religious service. Yet apparently not 
all players were conscientious, for many 
had to sign papers pledging, on pain of 
death or forfeiture, to know their lines 
and get to rehearsals on time. 

— St. Mary's Church, Asheville. 



13 



AROUND THE DIOCESE . . . 

On his Easter Sunday visit to ST. 
GEORGE'S CHURCH, W. Asheville, 
the Bishop confirmed eight candidates 
presented by Mr. Hickey, at the same 
service, the Bishop blessed two altar 
candlesticks. 

The Rev. GEORGE FLOYD ROG- 
ERS, rector of Trinity, Asheville, for 
over twenty years, passed on to rest on 
April 9. The offices of the Church were 
said at Peterburg, Virginia; Trinity 
Church had a memorial service at the 
same hour. Parson Rogers was a prom- 
inent figure not only in affairs of the 
community of Asheville, but gave lead- 
ership of outstanding vigor to the Dio- 
cese. 

The Rev. JAMES P. BURKE, is 
currently on a trip through the Holy 
Land. St. James' Church is making 
every effort to make the 29th annual 
convention a success; Mrs. R. L. Haden 
is chairman of the arrangements com- 
mittee. On Easter I, a film on "The 
Cherokee's" was shown at St. James'; 
Mr. Robroy Farqhar, Lake Summit 
Theatre, read the accompanying script. 

The historical drama at CHEROKEE 
this summer will give all Churchman 
an opportunity to make a pilgrimage 
to the Church of St. Francis of Assisi 
at the same time. Plan to do so. 

TIME Magazine carried an interest- 
ing article in the March 26 issue con- 
cerning the relationship of our Com- 
munion with the whole of Christendom 
in America. The reaction in the Dio- 
cese and out was mixed; at any rate, 
it gives us chance to see ourselves as 
others see us. The biographical ma- 
terial on Bishop Sherrill has permanent 
value. 

The Rev. A. RUFUS MORGAN re- 
cently attended regional meetings of the 
Southern Conference of Mountain 
Workers, at Gatlinburg; and, the re- 
gional meeting of the National Council 
of Churches of Christ in America at 
Atlanta. Mr. Morgan is vice-president 
of the former agency. 



AUXILIARY PROGRAM PLANNED 

Women of the Episcopal Church are 
being asked by the Woman's Auxiliary, 
to write meeting programs on a num- 
ber of topics of current interest and 
concern in the Church. The general 
idea of enlisting non-professional help 
is termed "The Stewardship of Talent," 
and the thought is conveyed that "The 
plan makes it possible for every woman 
to offer the kind of program she has al- 
ways wished she could find being used 
in her group. It means that women 
with a gift for creative writing may 
contribute that talent to the work of the 
Church. It means that programs sub- 
mitted will be indicative of the kind de- 
sired. It means hidden ability; writers, 
now unknown, may be discovered." 

Manuscripts must be received before 
July 1. They will be read by members 
of the Episcopal Church's National 
Council, and the final judges will be 
members of the National Executive 
Board of the Woman's Auxiliary. 

Full information may be obtained 
from Miss Avil E. Harvey, 281 Fourth 
Avenue, New York 10, New York. 



TRINITY, HAW CREEK, has been 
given a stained glass window by W. B. 
Bartlett, placed for the glory of God 
in memory of his wife, the late Mrs. 
Lillian S. Bartlett. The window has 
been placed as an altar windpw. Mrs. 
Barlett was a devout and loyal Church- 
woman. She was a graduate of Christ 
School when it was yet a coeducational 
institution. During her girlhood, Mrs. 
Bartlett was a communicant of Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, walking two mil^es 
and back every Sunday for the 8 A.M. 
service. The window will be blessed 
on Mothers Day by the Bishop of the 
Diocese. 

The Annual Spring MISSION AT 
PATTERSON SCHOOL was held the 
week of April 1 ; the editor was the 
preacher. Three boys were Baptised 
during the week, and, the Bishop Con- 
firmed eight boys on Easter II. 



14 




The Children s Choir, Church of the Messiah. 



ST. MARY'S CHURCH, Asheville, 
has organized a Parent-Teachers Asso- 
ciation for their Church School. At this 
writing, and to our knowledge, this is 
another ""first" for St. Mary's. Inci- 
dentally, the plan follows the approach 
of the new curriculum approved for 
Nursery, Kindergarten, and Primary 
groups. St. Mary's is planning exten- 
sive repairs to the Rectory on Charlotte 
Street. 



CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH, 

Murphy, has organized a Children's 
Choir which has added measureably to 
the services of that Church. The Aux- 
iliary, Church School, and women of 
the Church purchased materials and 
made vestments; Mrs. Myron Jensen 
has been appointed choir mother and 
has trained the group. Mr. William 
Bolton is in charge of the Church of 
the Messiah. 



APPALACHIAN SCHOOL 



PENLAND, N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



THE PflTTERSUN SeflOTt%BQ¥S 




A Church School of the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina. Accredited. Grades 6-12. 
Gymnasium, sports. 42nd year. 1300-acre 
estate. Board & Tuition moderate. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood, N. C. HEALTH 

PREPARATORY EDUCATION 

CHARACTER BUILDING 



15 



BISHOP GORDON WRITES 
FROM ALASKA 

At least fifteen Indian and Eskimo 
villages in Alaska have a population, 
made up almost entirely of Episcopal 
Church people according to a statement 
by Bishop William J. Gordon, -and not 
one of these places has a resident 
Church worker, man or woman. They 
are visited by the nearest priest perhaps 
two or three times a year. Fly-by-night 
sects pass through these areas with 
some regularity; their influence and that 
i " paganism and indifference take their, 
toil, decreasing the number of Church 
people each year, as wolves would do 
around any unshepherded flock. "The 
people love the Episcopal Church," the 
Bishop wrote, "but they have precious 
little opportunity of expressing their 
love through worship or in learning 
more about God's way for them. 

"During 1950 two small churches 
were built in isolated native cillages, 
Tetlin and Holigachaket, where we 
have never before had a church build- 
ing even though all the inhabitants be- 
long to the Episcopal Church. I held 
the first regular service in St. An- 
drew's Chapel, Tetlin, with the outside 
temperature at fifty-eight below zero, 
so we fully tested the heating system. 
Another new chapel has been started 
at Stevens Village on the Yukon, to be 
completed this year. 

"We have one new congregation, the 
fishing town of Petersburg on the south- 
eastern coast. I confirmed the first 
candidates, to my knowledge, ever con- 
firmed in that town. Our priest at 
Wrangell visits Petersburg regularly, at 
the request of the residents there. We 
have a congregation of almost fifty per- 
sons, who are enthusiastic in their de- 
votion." 

Anchorage is a city of about 25,000 
people plus a reasonable estimate of 
20,000 troops near by, and more to 
come as soon as they can be housed. 
For Alaska this is an enormous com- 



munity, and for any area it is a large 
problem for a parish. 

"Our present little church was erect- 
ed when Anchorage was a village with 
if ewer than 2,000," the Bishop reported. 
The Church seats about eighty persons, 
and has no; facilities for a Church 
school. The government is putting into 
new construction in Alaska in 1951 
more than two hundred million dollars. 
The parish is struggling to raise money 
for a new church but as yet has less 
than a fourth of the $125,000 needed 
foflpand, church, parish hall and rec- 
tory. 

"I visited each mission in Alaska at 
least once, last year, and most of the 
outstations," the Bishop said. "In vis- 
iting them I have flown my plane about 
15,000 miles. Without this wonderful 
convenience it would simply be impos- 
sible to visit each mission during the 
twelve months of a year." 

It is an old story with the missionary 
district of Alaska, continued during the 
past year, that the Church people more 
than paid their quota for the general 
"-ork of the Church, and contributed to 
the Bishop's salary, the Good Friday 
Offering, and the Church Building 
Fund, while several congregations made 
offerings for theological education. The 
small congregations of white people pay 
a little more each year toward the sup- 
port of their missions, with the ulti- 
mate aim of self-support at the earliest 
possible moment. 

"We see our great needs," the Bishop 
concludes, "and sometimes it is easy for 
us to be discouraged when we are not 
given the men and funds to meet the 
needs that face us. Yet we want the 
National Council to know that we do 
realize the problems and difficult de- 
cisions to be faced in the over-all ad- 
ministration of the work. We know that 
all fields are limited and handicapped 
by lack of funds and men, that every 
effort is made to meet the greatest 
needs with the resources available, and 
that if we are neglected it is because the 
resources are not there." 






16 



RECTOR HAS PRAYERS 
FOR LOCAL INDUSTRIES 
AT WEEKLY SERVICES 

Springfield, Mass. — St. Luke's Epis- 
copal Church, East Springfield, has an- 
nounced that it will pray at regular 
Sunday services for local gas stations, 
drug stores, manufacturing plants, and 
other business establishments by name. 

The rector, the Rev. Ellwyn J. H. 
Nichols, will pray: 

"Almighty God, Who hast given us 
this community for our heritage, we 
humbly beseech Thee that we may al- 
ways prove ourselves a people mindful 
of Thy favor and glad to do Thy will. 

"Bless especially (for example) the 
Corona Market, Loyal Masters Clean- 
ers and Dyers, and Carew Gardens' 
Service Station. 

"Save them and us from violence, 
discord and confusion. Bless our com- 
munity with good schools, honorable 
industry, sound civic life, and upright 
Christian citizens." 

A different group of business places 
will be mentioned each Sunday. Mr. 
Nichols said that the weekly prayer will 
serve to demonstrate and personalize 
the Church's interest in community 
commercial and industrial activities and 
their personnel. He also expressed the 
hope that it would make local residents 
"stop and think of Church and God." 



NEW NAM PRESIDENT IS 
PROMINENT EPISCOPALIAN 

Durham, N. C— William H. Ruffin, 
president of the Erwin Mills here, is 
the new president of the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers. He is senior 
warden of St. Philip's Episcopal Church 
here, and has been active in Church 
affairs for many years. He has been 
superintendent of a Sunday school, 
president of the Laymen's League, and 
has served on the executive council of 
the Diocese of North Carolina and as 
chairman of the diocesan department of 
finance. He has served also on the 
board of trustees of St. Mary's School 
and Junior College, Raleigh. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 




'•&! ^Tm TT^TA*l^ 0W -6ENE5EEi5T-:i 
:Cvj.:0'lL\JLLfl.\/ 3YRAeu.SE -n-y-+ :! 



17 



EARLY DAYS OF ST. JAMES' 
HENDERSONVILLE 

CHAPTERS IN DIOCESAN HISTORY 
The Rev. J. B. Sill, Historiographer 

The beginning of a congregation, 
which later was to become organized 
as St. James Parish, followed by a few 
years the opening of a stage-coach 
route in 1840 to Hendersonville from 
Greenville, S. C, and preceded by a 
few years the forming of a city govern- 
ment in 1847. This beginning as early 
as 1843 was due to the visits for the 
purpose of Church Services on the part 
of the Rector John G. Drayton of St. 
John's Church in the Wilderness at Flat 
Rock. Bishop Ives was bishop of North 
Carolina at the time. Well-known fam- 
ilies from South Carolina had learned 
the advantage of coming to the moun- 
tains for summer vacation purposes. St. 
John's Church, Flat Rock, having been 
organized by then, and later some of 
them settling several miles further, also 
for summer periods, and forming Cal- 
vary Parish at what now is Fletcher. 

The founders of St. James' Hender- 
sonville, were persons having a more 
permanent residence than those to 
whom I have referred. Bishop Atkin- 
son of North Carolina visited the Epis- 
copal congregation in Hendersonville in 
1854, having succeeded Bishop Ives the 
previous year. Calvary Church, to 
which I have referred, was consecrated 
in 1859. St. James Church was built 
in 1860, though not sufficiently com- 
pleted until 1863, when it was consecrat- 
ed Sept. 19th, being thus, as with The 
Redeemer, Shelby, a Church of the Con- 
federacy. It is still standing. Rev. N. 
Collin Hughes became its first Rector in 
1861, continuing until 1866. His son, 
Dr. N. Collin Hughes, who died in 1948, 
and his daughters have made their 
home in Hendersonville of recent years. 
The father was from Pennsylvania, ed- 
ucated and entered the ministry in the 
North, soon settling at New Bern, N. C, 
later in charge of the Church at Pitts- 
boro before coming to Hendersonville. 

There were eight communicants of 
St. James in 1863, and of early families 



we find the names of Andrew Miller, 
W. D. Miller, W. E. Massie and Wil- 
liam Shipp, W. D. Miller, though on 
the vestry, being a Presbyterian. "Mrs. 
William Shipp, who was formerly a 
Miss Cameron, and a sister of the wife 
of Rev. Jarvis Buxton of Asheville, was 
probably the strongest influence in es- 
tablishing the Church in this parish"; 
from Mrs. Sadie S. Patton's historical 
sketch of St. James Church. 

We are indebted also to Mrs. Patton 
for a picture of Hendersonville about 
the years 1850-60 in "County History," 
as also to Rev. N. Collin Hughes for his 
reminiscences of Hendersonville as a 
boy, while his father was Rector. Mrs. 
Patton writes: "Cows, horses and oth- 
er livestock were in the streets. Walk- 
ways of boards were constructed at 
street crossings, stepping stones in some 
places. Aspen trees lined both sides of 
Main Street, while another row was in 
the center lane. Oil lamps were used on 
the streets and mules were used on the 
first street railroad." The population 
in 1880 is recorded as 554. 

Rev. George M. Everhart was in 
charge of the Church for a short time 
after the Civil War, which left its per- 
iod of hard and disturbed years, so that 
for thirty years little progress was made 
in the life of the parish. 

When Rev. E. A. Osborne of Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, visited it in 1877 from 
his home in Fletcher, he found one 
communicant, "a Mrs. Chipley, and 
also the family of Henry Tudor Farmer 
of Flat Rock, who were interested in 
occasional services." Before Mr. Os- 
borne's time, Mr. Drayton, still at St. 
John's, Flat Rock, gave occasional ser- 
vices. So these two faithful priests from 
the two stronger parishes kept the life 
of the weaker parish alive. Bishop Ly- 
man of the diocese (that is North Caro- 
lina diocese) visited St. James during 
Mr. Osborne's time (who served the 
parish until 1884), confirming Mrs. 
Rachel Rebecca Lane and Mrs. Ellen 
Patton Hyman. "Thru the efforts and 
sacrifices of these two devoted women 
it was made possible to erect the pres- 



18 



ent tower of the Church and to pur- 
chase a bell." 

The value of the Church is given as 
$5000.00. The rectory, built many years 
later than the Church, was valued at 
$3000.00. It was a house moved from 
across the street and it stood near the 
Church, rooms being added to it. It was 
removed when the present rectory was 
built. {To be continued next month.) 



MORE NEEDED 

A young member of St. Stephen's 
Parish, Cincinnati, is with the Armed 
Forces in Korea. Recently he sent a 
check for his pledge, plus amounts for 
Easter and Christmas offerings. He 
wrote: "The closer I get to the fighting 
the more I realize that this, and any 
war, is just a delaying action, a fight for 
time, until Christianity wins the real 
fight in the hearts of men. That's the 
only fight that will ever end in peace 
on earth. . . . The only way I can see 
that this battle Can be won is by each 
person giving of his time and ability and 
money to help in the fight. So since 
I can't be there to help, I'll send what 
I can." 



MR. CHURCHMAN GOES 
TO WASHINGTON 

Members of the Methodist Church 
are the most numerous in the United 
States Senate, with Presbyterians and 
Episcopalians tied for second place. 
Xon-Roman senators include 19 Meth- 
dists, 14 Presbyterians, 14 Episcopal- 
ians, 10 Baptists, 8 Congregationalists, 
6 Disciples of Christ, 5 Lutherans, 3 
Mormons, 3 Scientists, and 1 Unitarian. 



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TRINITY CHURCH. Asheville. N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A.M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



CALL TELEPHONE 2-2461 FOR 

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Complete Heating Plants 

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CITIZENS HEATING CO. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



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REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL— JUNE 17-23. 1951 

Name Age_ 

Address :_ - l-L 

Parish or Mission ; -1 _ : 



,..^ Signature of Parent or Guardian • 

1 recbmrriend the aoove named applicant to the Diocesan Camp. 



(Rector or Priest in Charge) 

Cut out this application and mail to the Rev. Mark Jenkins, Calvary 
Church. Fletcher. N. C. together with $1.00 reeistration fee. 



TT 



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BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



tMfrtgrjlanb 
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VOL. XXI 



AUGUST, 1951 



No. 9 




Seven-foot model of the 98-inch, ten ton bronze bell which the American 
people through participation in the CRUSADE FOR FREEDOM will 
place in Berlin. The five figures around the bell represent the five races 
of man, shown passing the Torch of Freedom. Above them is the laurel 
of Peace. The inscription around the base of the bell reads: "That This 
World Under God Shall Have a New Birth of Freedom." The bell was 
designed by Walter Dorwin Teague. Episcopal Church people are being 
asked to participate in the Crusade. 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



(Ctfurrljman 

St. Andrews Church Canton, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy. 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Win. M. 
Redwood. 20 Cedarcliff Road. Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Robert McCloskey Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville, N. C. 
Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville. N. C. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

After Septemeber 15, 1951, please for- 
ward all correspondence to the HIGH- 
LAND CHURCHMAN, % the Diocese 
of W. N. C, 46 Macon Avenue, Ashe- 
ville. Have all correspondence plainly 
marked "Highland Churchman" on the 
envelope. 



SAME SONG — SECOND VERSE! ! 

The semi-annual report from the 
Treasurer of the Diocese gives evidence 
to the fact that some repetition is needed 
as to the basic facts of life (fiscal) as 
far as the diocesan finances are con- 
cerned. The report, printed on another 
page, indicates at the ^ mark in the 
fiscal year that income is not keeping 
up with outgo. Expenditures and print- 
ed figures seem impersonal — quite to 
the contrary, they are not so. For these 
figures indicate missionary salaries, 
help to needy missions, salaries of dio- 
cesan employees, and the like. (You 
know them well.) Please remember 
that Assessments and Quotas have been 
accepted by you before the year started 
— the assessments and quotas do not 
indicate what would be nice for you to 
give — it indicates what you have ob- 
ligated yourself for. 

However, with these pointed words, 
we are conscious and thankful that the 
Yi year figures for 1951 indicate that 
more and more churches are realizing 
the importance of REGULAR AND ON 
TIME payments to the diocesan Treas- 
urer. We're growing in grace: We 
need more improvement. 

Do not let the concerns of the next 
few months for the 1952 Budget keep 
from your remembrance the needs of 
this year of our Lord, 1951. . . . 

{The figures in the Treasurer's re- 
port are subject to minor corrections). 



For the second time, a PASTORAL 
LETTER of the House of Bishops has 
been printed in the CONGRESSION- 
AL RECORD. The first was the Pas- 
toral of 1949, introduced by Episcopal 
Church member the Hon. Hamilton C. 
Jones, Representative from Alabama. 
The latest one was the Pastoral of 1951, 
presented by the Hon. Howard W. 
Smith, Episcopal Churchman and Rep- 
resentative from Virginia. Mr. Smith 
said, in introducing the Pastoral: "The 
communication is entirely non-sectarian 
and contains so much sound philosophy 
that it should be read by every Amer- 
ican family. 



"While it points up our own short- 
comings as individuals and as a Nation, 
it holds a torch of hope and faith to all 
Christian people." 



In its awards of honorary degrees 
this year, the UNIVERSITY OF THE 
SOUTH honored three men who are 
or have been at some time, members of 
the National Council. They are, Mr. 
Thomas B. K. Ringe, Doctor of Civil 
Law; the Rt. Rev. Gerald Francis Bur- 
rill, Suffragan Bishop of Dallas; and 
the Rev. John Heuss, Director of the 
Department of Christian Education, and 
former member of the Council. 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA FROM PARISHES 

AND MISSIONS FROM JANUARY 1st to JUNE 30th, 1951 

On Assessments For On Quota For 
Support of the Diocese PARISHES Program of the Church 

Made Paid Accepted Paid 

$ 444.00 $ 412.00 Asheville, St. Mary's $ 1,140.00 $ 133.12 

72.00 — Asheville, St. Matthias' 100.00 10.00 

1,620.00 810.00 Asheville, Trinity 4,200 2,506.28 

1,188.00 495.00 Biltmore, All Souls' 3,090.00 1,357.61 

228.00 57.00 Brevard, St. Phillip's 595.00 185.90 

120.00 _ Flat Rock, St. John's 300.00 — 

432.00 216.00 Fletcher, Calvary 1,110.00 1,009.53 

420.00 210.00 Gastonia, St. Mark's 1,090.00 614.17 

432.00 _ Hendersonville, St. James' _ 1,110.00 475.99 

396.00 99.00 Hickory, Ascension 1,030.00 407.50 

288.00 72.00 Lenoir, St. James' 745.00 177.15 

108.00 127.00 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 290.00 76.50 

240.00 _ Marion, St. John's 625.00 63.94 

624.00 624.00 Morgan-ton, Grace 1,615.00 499.65 

468.00 117.00 Rutherfordton, St. Francis' 1,220.00 332.94 

852.00 426.00 Tryon, Holy Cross 2,215.00 1,107.52 

228.00 114.00 Waynesville, Grace 600.00 258.00 

96.00 48.00 Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 255.00 127.50 

Total 21,420.00 $ 9,337.30 

8,256.00 3,767.00/ 

MISSIONS 

12.00 — Andrews, Holy Comforter 25.00 10.70 

36.00 _ Arden, Christ School 95.00 51.65 

24.00 — Asheville, Grace Memorial 50.00 12.31 

144.00 36.00 Asheville, Redeemer (Craggy) 385.00 98.77 

48.00 36.00 Asheville, St. Luke's (Chunn's Cove).- 120.00 90.00 

36.00 30.00 Asheville, Trinity Chapel (Haw Crk.) 100.00 50.57 

12.00 _ Asheville, St. George's (W. Asheville) 25.00 157.53 

36.00 — Bat Cave, Transfiguration 90.00 2.04 

12.00 _. Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 25.00 — 

72.00 72.00 Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 105.00 107.00 

96.00 _ Black Mountain, St. James' 255.00 5.26 

120.00 _ Blowing Rock, St. Mary's 305.00 — 

60.00 60.00 Boone, St. Luke's 150.00 90.00 

12.00 12.00 Burke County, St. Paul's... 25.00 43.62 

96.00 24.00 Canton, St. Andrew's 250.00 71.16 

12.00 _ Cashiers, Good Shepherd 25.00 — 

12.00 _ Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 25.00 7.84 

24.00 _ Edneyville, St. Paul's 75.00 46.71 

108.00 12.50 Franklin, St. Agnes 275.00 24.96 

12.00 6.00 Franklin, St. Cyprian's 25.00 28.35 

96.00 48.00 Highlands, Incarnation 235.00 127.55 

24.00 24.00 High Shoals, St. John's 60.00 60.00 

12.00 _ Hot Springs, St. John's 30.00 — 

12.00 12.00 Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 25.00 20.00 

24.00 24.00 Lincoln County, Our Saviour 45.00 35.25 

12.00 _ Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 25.00 6.00 

12.00 _ Linville, All Saints' 25.00 — 

24.00 — Little Switzerland, Resurrection — — 

12.00 _ Morganton, St. Mary's (Qkr. Mds.)~~ 30.00 41.57 

12.00 12.00 Morganton, St. Stephen's 25.00 13.00 

72.00 35.00 Murphy, Messiah 125.00 102.50 

12.00 _ Murphy, St. Barnabas' 25.00 1.71 

18.00 18.00 Penland, Good Shepherd 25.00 97.73 

36.00 _ Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 80.00 — 

24.00 — Saluda, Transfiguration 65.00 — 

132.00 80.00 Shelby, Redeemer 340.00 2,180.50 

12.00 — Spruce Pine, Trinity 25.00 — 

24.00 _ Sylva, St. John's 60.00 8.95 

12.00 12.00 Tryon, Good Shepherd 25.00 8.00 

12.00 _ Upward, St. John the Baptist 25.00 — 

84.00 42.00 Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 210.00 117.38 

. Total 

$1,662.00 $ 596.00 4,085.00 1,766.61 

$9,918.00 $4,323.00 GRAND TOTAL ....$25,505.00 $11,103.91 



CRUSADE FOR OUR TIME 

Over the centuries the Christian 
church has faced many temporal ene- 
mies, and each time it has been trium- 
phant over them. Today it is opposed 
by the most powerful and ruthless of 
the lot, the atheistic Communism of So- 
viet Russia and her allies, which openly 
admits that it wants to wipe out be- 
lief in God just as it seeks to murder 
freedom, morality and the dignity of 
the individual. 

However, there are ways in which the 
free world can fight back. One of those 
ways is through the Crusade for Free- 
dom, which is now enlisting the aid of 
all Americans in opposition to Commun- 
ism. For it is through the Crusade for 
Freedom that millions of citizens are 
able to support the amazingly effective 
work of the anti-Communist broadcasts 
of Radio Free Europe. 

Radio Free Europe went into opera- 
tion in July of last year. It was a new 
venture, with the new idea that there 
is a place for a non-governmental pro- 
paganda organization that can hit hard 
and speak frankly. Its backers were 
sure that millions of people in the Rus- 
sian satellite countries would become 
our friends if only we could encourage 
them in their hope of eventual libera- 
tion. 

The idea has proven successful beyond 
all hopes of a year ago. Two stations 
in Germany are now broadcasting 
through the Iron Curtain. One, near 
Frankfurt, speaks in turn to Hungary, 
Bulgaria, Poland, Rumania and Albania. 
The other, at Munich, is beamed at 
Czechoslovakia. Radio Free Europe 
knows that its broadcasts are reaching 
their audiences, for it has received let- 
ters of deep appreciation smuggled from 
the common peoples of the captive coun- 
tries, and it has also been the target of 
hysterical name-calling by the Com- 
munist overlords. 

Its method has been to constantly tell 
the truth about the shabby, brutal be- 
trayals and tyrannies of the Kremlin 
and its agents. It warns against secret 



Communist agents, even to the extent of 
informing the people of a specific vil- 
lage that a certain resident is betraying 
his neighbors to the state police. It re- 
veals events that the regime tries hard to 
hide, such as instances of sabotage or 
defections from the party. It tells of 
endless instances of moral bankruptcy 
among party bigwigs, including murder, 
blackmail, drunkenness and lechery. 
Nothing is said that can't be proven. 

Radio Free Europe is supported by 
the American people, operating through 
the Crusade for Freedom. The Crusade 
provides the moral support and finds 
the money needed to keep Radio Free 
Europe operating. Last year 16-million 
people joined the Crusade. The goal 
for the drive this September is 25-mil- 
lion members and 3 ^-million dollars. 

The Crusade for Freedom is a cam- 
paign that every Christian can join with 
a good conscience. None of the things 
we cherish is so much threatened by 
Communism as is the belief in Jesus 
Christ. Communism has never made 
any bones about its opposition to the 
church, and its methods are made clear 
by Radio Free Europe's reports from 
behind the Iron Curtain. These reports 
tell of pastors tortured, imprisoned and 
murdered; of Communist stooges being 
placed in pulpits where they preach 
about the glory of Stalin; of churches 
being closed or turned into barracks and 
party headquarters. 

Churches have long prided themselves 
on being community leaders. This is 
one cause that the churches can support 
wholeheartedly, because it is a Crusade 
against the common enemy of both hu- 
manity and Christ. 



Laymen are active in the program of 
the Church in the HAWAIIAN IS- 
LANDS. Besides the conduct of the 
Every Member Canvass for all parishes 
and missions, they are keeping up dio- 
cesan property, gathering a library of 
Church music, and maintaining a blood 
bank which is of great help when some 
of the Church people are faced with the 
expense of transfusions. 



RATED WOMAN-POWER 

One of the highlights of the Annual 
Diocesan Convention of 1951 was the 
splendid report of the Woman's Auxili- 
ary in the Diocese, so ably presented by 
the Diocesan President. The yearbook, 
with reports of a year's work, recently 
published, adds lustre to the great hon- 
ors which the women of the Church 
have earned. There is not a man in the 
Church, of the Laity or of the Clergy, 
who would not admit that a great share 
of the Church's work is carried on by 
the women. 

For the past few years there has been 
a great emphasis upon laymans work 
in the Church. The National Councils 
program for men has revitalized and re- 
activated the male section of the 
Church's population into the position of 
becoming a real Man's Auxiliary to the 
total work of the Church. So much has 
been said and done about the laymans 
program, that we think it fitting to re- 
mind the Church that there still is a 
Womans Auxiliary (as if we didn't 
know!) We suggest that you all read 
the Auxiliary Yearbook for 1951-1952 
from cover to cover, as we did. You'll 
discover that the Church's program is 
motivated by woman-power. 

Our review of the Yearbook statistics 
however, brought to us somewhat of a 
wistful thought. If so much has been 
done by the local branches of the Aux- 
iliary, how much more could be done 
IF MORE OF THE WOMEN OF THE 
CHURCH WERE ACTIVE IN THE 
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY? Of the forty- 
four local church branches listed in the 
directory, only sixteen of them included 
in their membership all (or more) of 
the women in their church. In other 
words, in over 63% of the churches 
listed in the Directory, the rated wo- 
man-power was less than the number 
of women in those particular parishes 
or missions. 16% of the local church 
branches have 100% membership of 
women in their church. 18%, bless 
them, have more women listed in their 
Auxiliary than there are women in the 
Church — what missionaries they must 



be. Again, our wistful thought: if the 
Auxiliary is doing the magnificant job 
it is with only a partial utilization of 
woman-power, imagine the reports when 
the latent power is utilized. 

While we are editorializing about the 
general statistics, looking at the Direc- 
tory facts church-by-church, the mis- 
sion churches are doing a much better 
job of utilizing the woman-power of 
their church than are the parishes. We 
mentioned some of the branches as hav- 
ing more women enrolled in the Aux- 
iliary than there were women in the 
church — these were all in mission 
churches. Of course in the mission 
churches the need of 100% utilization 
of all power is necessary — one might 
conclude (with reservations) that when 
a church gets to a certain size other fac- 
tors make it unnecessary for everyone 
to be active! 

Whatever our conclusions might be, 
and we suspect that some may not agree 
with us, we can thank God that his 
Spirit is at work through the Woman's 
Auxiliary of our Church. We have a 
Rated Woman-Power in the Church. 
Power-ratings are interesting statistics. 
But engineering and machine ratings 
cannot be applied to our work for more 
obvious reasons than that we are talking 
about souls, not machines. A machine 
has a statistical power rating on paper, 
the actual power rating of a machine, 
however is much less, due to friction, 
poor engineering, heat loss, etc. A soul 
at work in the Church has a no statis- 
tical or calculated limited power-rating 
— there is no limit to what can be done, 
unless the sky's the limit! When we 
refer to RATED woman-power, or rat- 
ed man-power, in the Church, let us 
not think of limitations — there are no 
top-restrictions in what we can do. A 
churchman or churchworhan can be rat- 
ed only to go farther and higher than 
anyone dreams . . . 



Television producer MAL BOYD has 
dissolved his partnership with Mary 
Pickford and Buddy Rogers, to study 
for Episcopal Orders. 



GROUND BROKEN FOR ST. 
GEORGE'S CHURCH 

NEW ASHEVILLE MISSION BEGINS BUILDING 
PROGRAM 

On the afternoon of July 7, a fine 
summer day in itself, the Bishop of the 
Diocese, in the name of the Holy Trin- 
ity, turned over the first spadeful of 
earth in the excavation for St. George's 
Church, School Rd. and Mimosa Road, 
West Asheville. He was ably assisted 
by Vicar of St. George's, Howard McK. 
Hickey, and, the Warden, Mr. Robert 
Nehikian. The simple ceremony was 
an impressive one for the congregation 
and many friends of the congregation 
who were on hand for the occasion. The 
Bishop was fortunate in striking into 
the earth where no underground roots 
would hinder the progress; Messrs. 
Hickey and Nahikian did strike roots, 
however both managed to turn over a 
spadeful of good earth. The humor of 
that moment in no wise deterred from 
the solemnity of the occasion. The 
Bishop offered prayers for the new con- 
gregation and the speedy completion of 
the project; prayers were offered over 
the labors of the workers and crafts- 
men. The festival nature of the cere- 
mony had the overtones of serious in- 
tent and great potential. The good peo- 
ple of the congregation served refresh- 
ments to all the people attending the 
ceremony. 

Actual work was begun on the first 
unit of St. George's the following Tues- 
day with a bulldozer making easy work 
of necessary excavation. During the 
following week the men of St. George's 
dug and poured the footings for the 
foundation. The building will be a dual- 
purpose type,' used in the immediate 
future for both worship and other 
church functions. It will be masonry 
construction with brick facing. The 
lot on which the Church will be located 
is strategically located on the main, 
artery into the Malvern Hills section. 
It is bounded by a lot owned by the City 
of Asheville and to be developed into a 
park. The Church has right-of-way 
through this park property. 



CONRAD LEWIS KIMBROUGH 
ORDAINED DEACON 

On Saturday, July 7, Conrad L. Kim- 
brough was ordained deacon by the 
Bishop of the Diocese at St. Mary's 
Church, Asheville. Upon his ordination, 
the Bishop named him minister in 
charge of St. Andrew's Church, Besse- 
mer City, and, St. John's Church, High 
Shoals. He will work under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. Boyd Howarth, Rector 
of St. Mark's Church, Gastonia. 

Mr. Kimbrough was born and reared 
in Salisbury, North Carolina, and at- 
tended public schools there. His un- 
dergraduate work was begun at Bre- 
vard College, Brevard, N. C, and con- 
tinued at Berea College, Kentucky, 
where he received his bachelors degree 
in arts. He was enrolled as a postulant 
in this Diocese under the Rt. Rev. Rob- 
ert Gribbon. He matriculated to Nash- 
otah House Divinity School, Nashotah, 
Wisconsin, and received his baccalaur- 
eate in divinity there this Spring. 

The Rev. David Peebles delivered the 
ordination sermon and charge to the 
candidate at the ordination rites. Also 
assisting in the service, besides the Rec- 
tor of St. Mary's, Fr. Webbe, was the 
Rev. Harry Perry, the Rev. W. M. 
Moore, Jr. 

The entire congregation, after the 
service, enjoined to the social room in 
the crypt, where refreshments were 
served by the Auxiliary of St. Mary's 
Church. 

Mr. Kimbrough was the third in the 
trio of new clergy assuming work in the 
Diocese this summer. 



THE WORLD-WIDE ANGLICAN 
CONGRESS scheduled for August, 
1953, in Minneapolis has been post- 
poned to August, 1954. The reason for 
the postponement is that the date of 
the second assembly of the World Coun- 
cil of Churches has been changed from 
1953 to 1954. It is expected that many 
of the Anglican Congress delegates will 
also attend the World Council's As- 
sembly which will be held at North- 
western University, Evanston, Illinois. 



NEW CHAPEL AT PATTERSON 

THE SARAH JOYCE LENOIR MEMORIAL 
CHAPEL 

The Patterson School was founded in 
a beautiful colonial home which served 
the Patterson family for generations. As 
the school developed, buildings were 
erected for dormitories, housing of the 
faculty, classrooms, dining room, and 
chapel. A lovely library was built in 
the middle of the campus which made it 
the center of attraction and one of the 
most useful buildings. The library was 
given by Miss Sarah Lenoir and has 
been known as the Sarah Joyce Lenoir 
Library for a quarter of a century. 

The school chapel in Gard Hall was 
adequate at the time of its construction 
but as the school grew it became entire- 
ly too small to serve the purpose for 
which it was designed. Since it is a 
room in Gard Hall, there was no possi- 
bility of expansion. It was therefore 
necessary to make plans for a new chap- 
el which was to be built behind our pres- 
ent library. Recently, members of the 
Lenoir family, friends of the school, and 
school directors have felt that the pres- 
ent library building itself would serve a 
more useful purpose as a chapel. Their 
hearty approval of the plan to convert 
the building into the Sarah Joyce Le- 
noir Memorial Chapel is more than ap- 
preciated. I am sure it will be a true 
memorial to those to whom the chapel 
and furnishings are dedicated — one in 
which many young lives will be inspired 
and enriched. 

In former years we have published 
articles, asking for gifts for the Chapel 
building fund as memorials to members 
of the alumni who sacrificed their lives 
during the war, and to friends and 
loved ones who have entered into a full- 
er life with God. To date we have re- 
ceived a perfectly beautiful stained 
glass window, picturing the child Sam- 
uel at prayer, to be placed over the 
altar; the cost of a lovely organ; and 
$1432 to be used toward construction. 
One of the best Church architects in 
the South has offered his services to de- 
sign the Chapel and furnishings. When 



the plans are completed, we shall list 
definite pieces of furniture which you 
might give as memorials. A chancel 
and vesting rooms will have to be ad- 
ded to the building and will be started 
this year. We shall gladly receive and 
greatly appreciate any donations to- 
ward their erection. If you send the 
contribution as a memorial, it will be 
recorded in the Book of Remembrance 
along with those received in the past. 

You may be wondering what will be- 
come of the library when the building 
which now houses it is used as a chapel. 
Though the present chapel in Gard Hall 
is quite inadequate for that purpose, it 
can be made into a suitable and attrac- 
tive library with a few changes. A 
friend from Charlotte, North Carolina, 
has contributed the full amount of $\- 
000 to develop the new library as a 
memorial to her mother. This will be 
done this summer and the books and 
furniture will be in place for the opening 
of school on September 4. 

As time passes I hope that you visit 
us in order to enjoy the development of 
a finer and more useful Patterson 
School. Thank you. God's choicest 
blessings upon you ! 

— George F. Wiese. 



Southwest Mission Field 

During the summer months, services 
will be held at 4:30 Sunday afternoons 
at St. Johns, Cartoogechaye. Four sem- 
inary students from the Valle Crucis 
Rural Training Institute have been as- 
signed for work in the field of Mr. Mor- 
gan's missions. They will, among other 
things, conduct daily vacation Bible 
Schools in Murphy, Cherokee, Sylva, 
and Macon County. 



St. James', Hendersonville 

The Rev. James P. Burke is conval- 
escing from an illness and is reported 
much improved. Upon his return from 
the trip to the Holy Land, he resumed 
his duties at St. James' for two weeks 
before the indisposition kept him from 
active duty. 



All Souls', Biltmore 

The Women's Guild has at work a 
Committee of Twelve who are explor- 
ing means and methods of including 
more of the All Souls' women in their 
work (see editorial Rated Woman- 
Power). It is hoped that the work of 
this committee will definitely broaden 
the program of the guild during the 
coming year. Clemens Sandresky, di- 
rector of music at All Soul's, is a staff- 
member at Transylvania Music Camp 
near Brevard. 



St. Agnes', Franklin 

The Bishop of the Diocese was preach- 
er of the week at a town-wide preach- 
ing mission and "revival" sponsored by 
the churches of Franklin from July 15- 
22. A permanent tabernacle for such 
purposes is the joint property of Frank- 
lin churches — each year's revival being 
planned by one of the churches. Splen- 
did attendance and fine reception were 
given to the Bishop's addresses, and, 
to quote a Baptist clergyman from that 
area, "this year's revival was the best 
yet." Earlier in the summer, Mr. Rufus 
Morgan, priest in charge, preached the 
sermon to the diaconate at the ordi- 
nation of his nephew, John MacReadie 
Barr, at Raleigh. 



THE ST. PAUL FESTIVAL being 
celebrated in Greece this year, had an 
official representative of the Episcopal 
Church, the Rt. Rev. Lauriston Scaifc, 
Bishop of Western New York, appoint- 
ed representative by the Presiding 
Bishop. 

There was a youth delegation under 
sponsorship of the World Council of 
Churches' Youth Department. Of the 
100 young people, two were members 
of the Episcopal Church, of the three 
who went from the United States. They 
were Rhoda Margaret Treherne-Thom- 
as, recent graduate of Teachers' Col- 
lege of Columbia LTniversity, and Rosa- 
mund Thomas Bennett of Boston, who 
has been working in Europe with the 
Refugee Division of the World Council. 



Grace Church, Morganton 

The Rector of Grace, and his asso- 
ciate, held a four-day parish CAMP 
FOR BOYS for the boys under 11 years 
of age in the parish. The camp was 
held at Patterson School in July. Dur- 
ing the summer months the regular Sun- 
day service has been moved forward 
one hour and attendance to include all 
children and youth above 4th grade, as 
well as adults. This plan offers a relief 
from the oppressive late-morning heat 
and allows the parish families to "get 
away from town" at an earlier date on 
Sunday for recreational purposes. 



Mrs. Beck, who was president last 
year of the Woman's Guild at the Mis- 
sion of the Holy Spirit, Orleans, Cali- 
fornia, has four sons serving in the 
LTnited States Navy. These members 
of one of the Church's Indian Missions, 
are all of Indian blood. 



Urging that Church people pray 
earnestly and constantly for peace, THE 
RT. REV. EDWARD L. PARSONS, 
retired bishop of California, says that 
while Americans may be divided about 
foreign policy, they are agreed in not 
believing in war, and in believing in 
prayer. 

Bishops Parsons suggests that in ad- 
dition to prayers for peace at all ser- 
vices, and inclusion of prayers for peace 
in private devotions, parishes could set 
aside a period in each week when peo- 
ple are asked to come and join in cor- 
porate prayer for peace. 



THE RT. REV. MICHAEL H. 
YASHIRO, enterprising as ever, writ- 
ing as Bishop of Kobe rather than as 
Presiding Bishop of the Church in Ja- 
pan, tells of a recent achievement in 
building a student hostel for 20 boys in 
Kobe. With a minimum of help from 
professional builders the Bishop and 30 
friends worked for a month, and the 
two-story building of wood and re'r • 
forced concrete with a tile roof was fin- 
ished, the work being done at half the 
normal cost because of volunteer labor. 




Robert D. Jordan, Director of 
Promotion for the National 
Council of the Episcopal 
Church who has accepted ap- 
pointment as a volunteer to 
lead the participation of all re- 
ligious bodies in the Crusade 
for Freedom, the movement 
sponsored by the National 
Committee for a Free Europe, 
of which Gen. Lucius D. Clay 
Is National Chairman. 



Seme statistics from the MISSION- 
ARY DISTRICT OF HONOLULU: 

Thirty-six stations, parishes and mis- 
sions, including two congregations at 
the Cathedral and two school chapels. 

Twenty-six "foreign" clergy (from 
the mainland) and five native to the is- 
lands or the Orient, and five retired. 

Baptisms during the year: adult 115, 
infant, 584; Confirmations 440 plus 33 
persons received from the Roman Com- 
munion. 

Church members, 11,545, of whom 
7,504 are communicants. 

Among the schools, Iolani has 752 
boys; St. Andrew's Priory 482 girls, 
Hawaii Episcopal Academy, 40. Day 
schools, 278. Kindergartens, 496. Thus 
more than 2,000 young people are in the 
Church's schools. 



REMEMBER "ARK"— American Relief 
For Korea 

Your minister can give you details of 
the Relief Program for Korea, and tell 
you about the need and what you can 
do. Your church is working through 
Church World Service — you can help, 
too. Other information is available 
through your Diocesan Christian Social 
Relations Committee, the Rev. Richard 
J. Lee, Chm. Other Committee mem- 
bers are Miss Mary D. Sumner, Mrs. 
Don Shoemaker, and the Rev. John W. 
Tuton. 



A 60% increase in second class mail- 
ing rates was voted by the House of 
Representatives post office and civil 
service committee. But the committee 
agreed that publications of churches, 
schools, religious organizations, and 
other non-profit institutions should be 
excluded from the increase. 



Soon after the architect finished draw- 
ing the plans for a new ST. MARK'S 
CHURCH, HONOLULU, the rector, 
the Rev. E. L. Souder, presented a con- 
firmation class, and two of the members 
were the architect and his wife. 



BERKELEY DIVINITY SCHOOL, 

New Haven, Conn., conferred the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Sacred Theol- 
ogy on the Ven. John Hardenbrook 
Townsend, Jr., Archdeacon of Colom- 
bia. 



THE REV. DR. TOLLIE L. CAU- 
TION, secretary for Negro work in the 
National Council's Division of Domesti' 
Missions has been elected a Trustee of 
the Philadelphia Divinity School. He 
is the first Negro to be elected to this 
office. 



ROTC At Sewanee 

The United States Air Force has es- 
tablished a ROTC Ground UJnit at the 
LTniversity of the South. Officer can- 
didates will be trained in Administra- 
tion and Logistics. ROTC enrollees 
will go to Air Force bases after receiv- 
ing degrees and commissions. 



SEWANEE SUPPORT INCREASES 

Sewanee, Tennessee. A five-year sur- 
vey of church support of the University 
of the South reveals a substantial in- 
crease in interest by Dioceses and par- 
ishes throughout the South, according 
to a statement presented to the Board 
of Trustees of the University at its 
meeting on June 8. "Church support" 
comprises the Diocesan quotas plus 
"Sewanee in the Budget" of individual 
parishes. The funds become part of 
Sevvanee's Living Endowment and are 
used for the operation and upkeep of 
the University and its School of Theol- 
ogy. Sons of Episcopal clergy attend 
the University of the South tuition-free. 

Nine of the owning 22 Diocesses ex- 
ceeded their 1950 quotas, to bring the 
total for the year to £47,850.79. The 
Dioceses of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, 
Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, Texas, and Upper South 
Carolina each contributed more than the 



quota asked. 

Since 1946, total church support has 
been increased by £16,011.98, and dur- 
ing the five year period many dioceses 
have multiplied the amounts of their 
contributions. The Dioceses of Easton 
(Maryland) and Western North Caro- 
lina gave approximately seven times as 
much in 1950 as in 1946, the Diocese 
of North Texas tripled its actual pay- 
ment, and the Dioceses of Atlanta, East 
Carolina, and LIpper South Carolina 
have doubled their gifts to the Univers- 
ity. By the end of 1951, the Diocese 
of Tennessee will have tripled its total 
giving since 1946. 

The five-year survey covers all church 
gifts from the Dioceses and their par- 
ishes except the offerings on "Theolog- 
ical Education Sunday" and gifts es- 
pecially designated for the Guerry Me- 
morial Campaign, according to Captain 
Wendell F. Kline, vice-president for 
Endowment at Sewanee. 



WE MISS A SCOOP! 

We are sorry that Sunday traffic and 
a broken-down Ford of ancient vintage 
kept our reporter from attending the 
ceremonies accompanying the comple- 
tion of the new Church of the Redeem- 
er at Shelby this summer. The new 
Church is just one of the many accom- 
plishments of that strong mission 
church. The Rev. Wm. H. Anthony, 
Ph.D., Priest in charge, and the good 
laity of the Church arc to be congratu- 
lated on their fine new building. We 
hope that future pages in THE HIGH- 
LAND CHURCHMAN might find 
room for a picture of the Church, and, 
news of even greater attainment at 
Shelby. 

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of 
the choir, THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. 
JOHN THE DIVINE in New York had 
a special service, with former choir boys 
participating. Two of the ex-choir 
boys who held a reunion were Burgess 
Meredith who once played Peter Pan, 
and the singer who played his father, 
Lanny Ross. 



QUIET, MEN AT WORK 

One is never conscious of many 
great things that are quietly happening 
in the Church in the Diocese. Of such 
is the annual Rural Training Institute 
for Theological Students at Valle Crucis. 
A score of theological seminarians de- 
scend upon the Valley of the Cross ev- 
ery summer, and after an intensive per- 
iod of study and preparation, are farmed 
out to the various missions and parishes 
in this Diocese that ask for their help. 
On the field they conduct vacation 
church schools, read the services of the 
Church, preach, and take care of nor- 
mal church activities. The whole pro- 
gram is under the direction of the Rev. 
Prof. Dargan Butt, of Seabury Western 
Seminary, and, former Priest in Charge 
of the Valle Crucis field. At the end of 
the summer, and before they return to 
their respective seminaries, the students 
return to Valle Crucis for a quick eval- 
uation of their summers work. The 
Diocese should be particularly thankful 
for this program and the help it gives 
us in our parochial work. 



10 






RIOT INSURANCE FOR CHURCHES 

It is not modesty alone that moves 
the Editor of this paper to allow his 
pages to be partially filled by "guest 
editorials" such as the article "I Met a 
Boy in Haiti ..." which was used in 
last months edition. This month the 
following "article" was read and reread 
by us in the August 1 issue of THE 
CHRISTIAN CENTURY. We print 
it herein in full, hoping you'll enjoy it, 
too. "Simeon Stylites" is the pen name 
used by the Rev. Professor Halford 
Luc cock of Yale Divinity School, Nezv 
Haven, Conn. 
Editor The Christian Century: 

Sir: Is your church insured against 
riots? If you are not insured against 
damage incurred through violent out- 
bursts, you are overlooking a great form 
of "coverage" offered by the farseeing 
geniuses who guide the insurance com- . 
panies. 

Here comes a letter from the Rev. 
Leonard E. Tinker of Wapello, Iowa, 
which stirs the imagination: 

In today's mail came an adver- 
tisement from a company insuring 
only church-owned property. Un- 
der an appeal to purchase "extend- 
ed coverage" it reads: "For a few 
cents more the following items can 
be added to your fire policy . . . 
Riot. Loss or damage by riot and 
riot attending strike, and also di- 
rect damage done by sitdown strik- 
ers while occupying assured's prem- 
ises." 

We don't have any riots around 
our church — though some Iowa 
churches do — but I am impressed 
and grateful to know that insurance 
is available to cover the "sitdown" 
strike problem in churches. 
Think of it! Only a few cents more! 
That ought to melt the heart of even 
the tightest trustee. 

We will all admit that there is more 
danger from a sitdown strike in the 
church than from riots. Think of hav- 
ing insured all the damage done to the 
church by sitdown strikes among its 
members ! 

11 



Riot danger, alas, does not call for 
such feverish haste. Churches damaged 
by riots are few. (Breakage by Boy 
Scouts is not a riot, in the legal sense. 
It is merely welcome evidence that the 
church is going about its rightful busi- 
ness: "Suffer the little children to come 
unto me.") There is more danger from 
termites, dry rot and the deathwatch 
beetle than from riots. Often the mess- 
age is so decorous, in such good taste, 
so sedative and soporific that it might 
have come from a book of etiquette rath- 
er than from the New Testament, in 
which the etiquette is often terrible. 
There is not much danger of reading 
an item like this in the paper: 

The First Church on Sunday 
morning was the scene of a disas- 
trous riot. It was a special service 
attended by the Veterans of the 
War of 1912. Dr. Boanerges in the 
course of his sermon declared that 
"while, of course, we must allow for 
inevitable exceptions, on the whole, 
and by and large, honesty is the 
best policy." This wild and subver- 
sive message was too much for most 
of the congregation, which broke 
out in an uproar of protest. Win- 
dows were broken and casualties 
sent to the hospital. 
But it has happened — that is, a riot 
in the service. An old book, still hap- 
pily in print, tells of a lot of riots. We 
read, after an account of a talk by a 
man named Peter, "And when they 
heard this they were enraged and want- 
ed to kill them." Again, after a sermon 
was over, "... having persuaded the 
people, they stoned Paul and dragged 
him out of the city, supposing him 
dead." St. Paul could have made good 
use of an "extended coverage" policy. 
Yours, Simeon Stylites. 



The Bishop of the Diocese will meet 
with the Clergy and Lay Workers of 
the Diocese on September 11, 1951. The 
meeting has been called for 10:30 A. M. 
The Bishop urges that all persons con- 
cerned attend the Conference. Part of 
the agenda concerns the Every Aaember 
Canvass for Fall. 



FORMING OF THE MISSIONARY 
DISTRICT OF ASHEVILLE 

CHAPTERS IN DIOCESAN HISTORY 

The present section of North Caro- 
lina included in the Western North 
Carolina diocese formed the Missionary 
District of Asheville. It was a section 
of the diocese of North Carolina. Some 
years previously to the forming of the 
Missionary District, the diocese of East 
Carolina had been formed by taking a 
section of the mother diocese of North 
Carolina. The growth of the state's 
industrial life and the resultant increase 
of population and the wide extent of the 
state's area made it seem wise to our 
Church leaders of the last decade of the 
nineteenth century to form this Mis- 
sionary Jurisdiction of Asheville. Reso- 
lutions to consider this were introduced 
into the 1894 Convention of the North 
Carolina diocese and a committee ap- 
pointed to the next convention. At this 
convention the committee reported fav- 
orably on the plan, and introduced the 
following resolutions: Resolved that it 
is advisable to request the General Con- 



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For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr. 

RECTOR 



O.G.S. 



vention to set apart the western part 
of the Diocese of North Carolina as a 
Missionary Jurisdiction; resolved that 
the line of division for the proposed 
Jurisdiction be the eastern boundaries 
of the counties of Alleghany, Wilkes, 
Alexander, Catawba, Lincoln and Gas- 
ton. It was necessary for the General 
Convention of the Church which was to 
meet in Minneapolis in October of 1895 
to act in the matter of forming this 
Missionary District of the Church. 

The General Convention elects Mis- 
sionary Bishops, but the election for 
our Missionary District needed to wait 
until the District was organized. There- 
fore Bishop Cheshire, Assistant Bishop 
of N. C. was asked by the Church's 
Presiding Bishop to be the Bishop of the 
District until one was chosen for it. He 
had been elected Assistant Bishop in 
1893, Bishop Lyman having become 
feeble and of the age of 78. Bishop 
Lyman died Dec. 13, 1893. There had 
been much contest of candidates in the 
election of the Assistant Bishop, Bishop 
Cheshire having been chosen on the 



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12 



39th ballot. It is well to give the words 
of Bishop Cheshire in his convention 
address at the N. C. Convention of 
1895: "It does seem to me that if our 
good authorities can be persuaded to 
undertake the burden of this work and 
to support a bishop and missionaries in 
the mountain region of our State, it will 
not only be a relief to this diocese, and 
allow us to give ourselves more effec- 
tively to the development of the work 
in our smaller territory, but it will give 
a wonderful impetus to the growth and 
development of the Church in the re- 
gion set off." Bishop Cheshire said that 
he had been able to give not more than 
nine weeks of his time to the visitations 
in this region of the diocese which em- 
braced nearly thirty counties. He said 
that "much therefore, as we should all 
regret the separation from our friends 
and brethren, we must see that the in- 
terests of God's Kingdom demand this, 
if the Church is prepared to undertake 
the work." 



The Primary Convention of the Mis- 
sionary District of Asheville was held 
in Trinity Church, Asheville, Nov. 12, 
1895, of which the Rev. McNeely Du- 
Bose was rector, it being the second 
Church building of the parish. Dr. Bux- 
ton, who had been rector of the parish 
for about 40 years since its beginning, 
had resigned but a few years previous, 
and was now rector at Lenoir. There 
were eight parishes, as the District was 
formed, and 46 Missions of which 1 1 
were organized. Those who carried and 
were to carry the burden of organizing 
the District are ones whom older mem- 
bers of the diocese still living will re- 
member or whose names are familiar 
to them. Dr. Wetmore of Lincolnton 
became the presiding officer of the Con- 
vention, Rev. H. H. Phelps of Calvary 
Church, Fletcher its secretary. The 
Standing Committee, appointed by the 
Bishop, consisted of Dr. Weston of the 
Ascension, Hickory, Rev. Alfred Stubbs, 
of the Ravenscroft Associate Mission, 



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13 



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Mr. Thomas A. Jones of Trinity, Ashe- 
ville, and Mr. John H. Pearson of 
Grace Church, Morganton. The trus- 
tees of the District elected were the 
Bishop, Thomas W. Patton of Trinity, 
Asheville, and Hayward Parker of Trin- 
ity, Asheville. There were to be three 
Convocations in the District, those of 
Lincolnton, Morganton and Waynes- 
ville, of which Dr. Wetmore, Dr. Bux- 
ton and Mr. Stubbs were chosen Deans, 
respectively. It was a two-day con- 
vention. Services of Holy Communion, 
Morning and Evening Prayer were held. 
Bishop Cheshire gave his address, Chief 
matters of legislation had to do with 
the Bishop's salary, the plans for an 
endowment to help meet a future bish- 
op's salary, legal transfer of property 
from N. C. diocese to the Missionary 
Jurisdiction, and meeting the stipends of 
the District's Missionaries. The Social 
Service side of the Church's duties were 
even to the fore in that first convention 
with a motion to encourage interest in 
the conditions of the city jails and 
County Poor Homes. The Constitu- 
tion and Canons of the N. C. diocese 
were adopted as local circumstances 
permit, it being required by the Na- 
tional Church that those of some dio- 
cese should be adopted temporarily by 
a new Missionary District. 

The following resolutions of Mr. 
Thomas Patton speaks for the good 
spirit in which the new District started 
on its course as separated from, yet 
proceeding from, that of its diocesan 
mother: "Resolved that the Initial Act 
of the first meeting of this Convocation 
(so started) be to assure these brethren 
(of the N. C. diocese) that we desire 
that this separation shall cause no in- 
terruption in the affectionate interest 
which each will ever take in hearing 
of the welfare, the personal prosperity 
and above all, of the success in extend- 
ing the borders of our dear Mother 
Church, which shall be accorded the 
other." And in referring to the best 
interests of the State he offers the fol- 
lowing: "Resolved that we will labor 
and now call on every member of this 



14 



Jurisdiction to strive during life to pre- 
serve intact his high calling of honest 
conservation . . . and urge upon her 
people to observe her laws . . . and pro- 
mote the day when love shall be the 
only law required for the government 
of North Carolinians.'' 

— The Rev. J. B. Sill. 



Against stiff competition, the Nation- 
al Council's motion picture of Church 
work in the Navajo country, WINDOW* 
ON THE SKY has won the Cleveland 
Film Council's award for the best re- 
ligious film of the year. 

The award, considered one of the 
most important in film evaluations, 
made through audience selection, was 
in open competition with pictures sub 
mitted by The Protestant Film Com- 
mission, the Swedish Travel Office, 
Schauffler College, the Presbyterian 
Church, the Encyclopedia Brittanica 
and the Methodist Church. 

Officers of Department of Promotion 
of the National Council responsible for 
making the film, expressed the highest 
gratification and encouragement upon 
being notified of the award. 

The film was made for the National 
Council by Alan Shilin, young inde- 
pendent producer, and is a completely 
professional production. It is in full 
color, with sound, and the actors are 
Navajos and members of the Navajo 
Mission staff. Much of the action cen- 
ters at the Good Shepherd Mission to 
the Navajo Indians, Fort Defiance, 
Arizona, and the Rev. David W. Clark 
and Mrs. Clark show the actual minis- 
try of the Mission, and its never-ceasing 
service to the Navajo people. 

"Window on the Sky" is available 
for parish showing throughout the 
Church, and has been highly praised 
wherever shown. It is 16mm. and runs 
25 minutes. It may be ordered from the 
Film Library, 281 Fourth Avenue, New 
York 10, New York. 

"Window on the Sky" was shown on 
CBS Television on Sunday, July 1, as 
the feature of the regular religious pro- 
gram "Lamp Unto My Feet." 



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3M|igf)lattb 
Churchman 




VOL. XXI 



SEPTEMBER, 1951 



No. 10 



NEW EDITOR NAMED FOR HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN 



As of September 15, 1951, the editor- 
in-charge of the HIGHLAND 
CHURCHMAN will be the Reverend 
Gale D. Webbe, Rector of St. Mary's 
Church, 339 Charlotte Street, Asheville. 
Fr. Webbe's appointment was made by 
the Department of Promotion, and, the 
Bishop of the Diocese. His duties will 
begin immediately. 

The appointment of Father Webbe as 
editor of this paper, is, in our estima- 
tion, one of the most fortunate happen- 
ings that has occurred in the lustrous 
history of the official diocesan paper. 
His personal qualities, and his duties of 
an official diocesan nature, make him 
most qualified to bring the Highland 
Churchman to a place of prominence in 
the life of the Church. Personally, he is 
known to be serious, scholarly, friendly 
— he is an ardent defender of the faith 
once delivered to the saints. He has had 



a background of work in the Church 
that is a decided asset — in non-paro- 
chial work, he was Chaplain to Christ 
School for a few years; in parochial 
work, he has had a successful min- 
istry at St. Mary's in which his true 
evangelical zeal has brought many can- 
didates to the Bishop for Confirmation. 
As the Secretary of the Diocese and An- 
nual Convention, he has at his finger- 
tips all official and important news of 
the Church in W.N.C. As head of the 
Department of Promotion of the Dio- 
cese, he already has a knowledge of the 
work and mission of the diocesan paper. 
The other faithful staff members of 
the Highland Churchman will remain 
in their honored posts under the new 
editor. The October Issue will be un- 
der the direction of Fr. Webbe and will 
keynote the 1952 Every Member Can- 
vass Drive. 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



Sty? Sftgfflanfc 
(Etjurrtjman 



339 Charlotte St. 



Asheville, N. C. 



Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3. 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
Henry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road. Biltmore 

Forest. Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Gale D. Webbe Editor-elect 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville. N. C. 
Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park. Asheville. N. C. 



PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF 
ADDRESS OF EDITORIAL OFFICES 



MORBUS SABBATICUS 

"Morbus Sabbaticus, or Sunday Sick- 
ness, is a disease peculiar to Church- 
goers. The attack comes on suddenly 
on Sunday morning. No symptoms are 
felt on Saturday evening. The patient 
sleeps well, and eats a hearty breakfast, 
but about Church time the attack comes 
on and continues until the morning ser- 
vice is over. At dinner time the patient 
feels easier and takes a good meal. In 
the afternoon he feels so much better 
that he can take a ride, talk politics, 
and read the newspaper. No further 
symptoms appear until the following 
Sunday. The chief peculiarities are: 
never appears except on Sunday; symp- 
toms vary, but never affect sleep, meals, 
or pleasure; generally attacks the head 
of the family." — Quoted from The Mes- 
senger, Grace Church, Morganton. 



McCLOSKEY RESIGNS 

The Rev. Robert J. McCloskey has 
resigned the editorship of the High- 
land Churchman as of September 15, 
1951, having been acting in such capaci- 
ty since January 1950. 

The occasion for his resignation was 
his acceptance of a call to become As- 
sociate to the Dean, and Canon of St. 
John's Cathedral, Jacksonville, Florida. 
Mr. McCloskey will begin his duties 
there in the middle of September. 

Mr. McCloskey has been in charge 
of St. Andrew's Church, Canton, since 
June 1949; this year he was priest-in- 
charge of St. John's Church, Hot 
Springs. He is a member of the Execu- 
tive Council of the Diocese; and dele- 
gate to Provincial Synod. He has been 
on the staff of the Diocesan Youth Camp 
for two summers. 

In Florida, Mr. McCloskey will be 
associated with the Very Rev. Arnold 
M. Lewis, new dean of the Cathedral 
Church of the Diocese of Florida. Un- 
til the Spring of this year, Dean Lewis 
was executive director of the Presiding 
Bishop's Committee on Laymans Work, 
281 4th Avenue, N. Y. C. Dean Lewis 
and Mr. McCloskey will renew a friend- 
ship which began some years ago on 
Long Island, N. Y. 



All Souls, Biltmore 

The Parish Supper Club met on Mon- 
day, August 27. Special arrangement 
was made with the well known cartoon- 
ist, Mr. George Stratton, N. Y. C, who 
gave his professional program to the 
supper club. 

According to the parish LEAFLET, 
the first two Sundays in September will 
be vacation Sundays for the Choir and 
Organist of All Souls. The responsi- 
bility for the service music was placed 
in the hands of the congregation. To 
quote, "The thought is that it would do 
the congregation good to be on its own 
for two Sundays and it will be a refresh- 
ing break for the choir . . . Let's see 
what happens." (Ed. — What Hap- 
pened?) 



43RD YEAR OPENS AT PATTERSON 

Miss Helen Thomas 

Sixty-three boys from North and 
South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, 
Virginia, Michigan, Florida, New Jer- 
sey, Maryland, New Mexico and Alaska 
were on hand Tuesday morning, Sep- 
tember 4, for the opening service at Pat- 
terson School for Boys in Happy Val- 
ley. The Reverend Boston M. Lackey, 
School Chaplain, and Rector of St. 
James' Church in Lenoir, was celebrant 
at the service of Holy Communion, 
which was held in the new Chapel. Mr. 
Lackey spoke to the boys of their re- 
sponsibility in life, and their responsi- 
bility to their school and their country. 

Following the service, registration for 
classes began, after which the boys gath- 
ered in the Chapel for a General As- 
sembly Meeting. Mr. George F. Wiese, 
School Superintendent, welcomed the 
boys and gave them a general idea as to 
the school rules and regulations. 

Classes began in earnest the follow- 
ing morning, with such capable teach- 
ers as Mr. Wiese, who teaches Bible; 
Principal Alfred A. Whipple, who 
teaches English and French; Jessie 
Hawkins, Workshop; Alvin Fowler, Ag- 
riculture and Biology; Miss Frances 
Chester, Typing; Ronald Cox, Coach; 
Charles Snyder, Science and Math; 
Miss Margaret Beaufort, Librarian and 
History; W. C. McClammy, 7th grade. 
Miss Beaufort and Mr. McClammy are 
new on the faculty this year. Other 
new staff include Miss Florence Tyler, 
Housemother; Mrs. Hazel Mustain, 
Dietitian, who has already shown us 
what good meals are in store for us 
this year; and Miss Helen Thomas, 
Promotion Director. 

There have been many new improve- 
ments at the school this year, including 
a new library, located in Gard Hall, 
where the old Chapel was formerly 
found. The library building has been 
converted as a Chapel, complete with 
Altar, Chancel furnishings and a new 
Wurlitzer Organ, a gift from a friend 
of the school, in memory of his par- 



ents. The Chapel has been painted, 
and it is hoped that in the very near 
future it can be enlarged sufficiently 
to include the proper shape and archi- 
tecture of a Gothic Church. In order to 
do this, the front part of the building 
must be torn down and completely re- 
built. 

A Recreation Room for the boys, in 
the basement of the spacious gymnas- 
ium, is being furnished, though we are 
in need of such things as games, ping 
pong tables, card tables, discarded fur- 
niture, or anything that can be used in a 
recreation room. The boys have been 
very much interested in this new project, 
and it is the hope of the school faculty 
that they will soon have a place where 
they can spend their free hours with 
such entertainment as suits each boys' 
fancy. 

The school enrollment is larger than 
last year, and it is good to see so many 
new faces among the old. We are look- 
ing forward to a bigger and better year 
at Patterson School, and extend a hearty 
welcome to all our friends to visit us 
at any time during the school year. 



St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows 

Trinity XV, September 2, was a festi- 
val occasion for this mission in the larg- 
er parish of Grace, Morganton. It 
marked the 50th Anniversary of the 
founding of the mission. The Rev. Wil- 
liam S. Stoney, former priest-in-charge, 
was the guest preacher for the day. A 
festival service followed a luncheon at 
12:30 p.m. 



Grace Church, Waynesville 

Grace Church was host to a district 
meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary held 
on August 29. After a delightful supper, 
guests from the several churches in the 
district heard Mrs. W. D. Whisnant of 
Thompson Orphanage tell of the work 
at the orphanage. Colored slides were 
shown. Thompson Orphanage officially 
receives support from the Diocese of 
W.N.C., and the Thanksgiving Offer- 
ings in the diocese go towards the pro- 
gram there. 



WOMANS AUXILIARY 

Mae D. Starr ett 

520 Lenoir Street 

Morganton, N. C. 
Goals 

Now would seem an excellent time for 
every Auxiliary member to familiarize 
herself with the goals adopted by the 
1951 Annual Meeting. It becomes the 
responsibility of each of us to strive for 
the attainment of them in each and ev- 
ery Auxiliary Branch. 

1. Every Branch hold an installation 
"service for officers. 

2. Four Corporate Communions to be 
held each year; two at the presentation 
of the U.T.O. 

3. Form Prayer Groups or study 
groups on personal religion. 

4. Every Church woman of every 
parish and mission a member of the 
Woman's Auxiliary. 

5. Every woman of every parish and 
mission a thankful participant in the 
United Thank Offering. 

6. Every Branch subscribe to 
"Churchways" for its officers and stand- 
ing committee chairmen. 

7. The Auxiliary plan its work with 
young people; toward giving them im- 
petus and support in understanding the 
field of Christian service. 

8. Every Branch stress family prayer 
as a part of normal Christian life. 

9. Every branch encourage participa- 
tion in interdenominational and com- 
munity activities. 

10. Every branch officer and chair- 
man attend District Training Institute. 

11. Every branch see that the 
Church's program of Christian Educa- 
tion be presented to the congregation 
of its church. 

12. Every Auxiliary member feel a 
responsibility for bringing people to 
Baptism and Confirmation. 



nual tea for summer visitors in August, 
and will have a general meeting of all 
groups in September. 

Grace Church, Morganton: The 
church "nursery" has been added to the 
responsibilities of this Auxiliary. Other 
projects are Social Service, which in- 
clude monthly visits to assigned wards 
at the State Hospital; visiting new mem- 
bers; care of parish house kitchen; care 
of vestments. 

UNITED THANK OFFERING- 
SEPTEMBER 29 

The Diocesan U.T.O. Chairman, Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney, urges all women in the 
Church to support the Fall Presentation 
of the U.T.O. on St. Michaels and All 
Angels, September 29. Last Fall's Of- 
fering was the largest one in diocesan 
history — this one should be even greater. 



DEACONESS PROGRAM EXPANDED 

The Bishop of Chicago has reminded 
us of the program to reestablish dea- 
coness centers approved by the Council 
of Bishops in Dallas this year. Under- 
graduate training for deaconesses will 
be undertaken at Daniel Baker College, 
Brownville, Texas. A center for grad- 
uate deaconess training is at present be- 
ing planned for Evanston, Illinois. 

For further information concerning 
this enlarged program, write the Bishop 
of Chicago, or, Deaconess Ruth John- 
son, Executive Secretary, National Con- 
ference of Deaconesses, 1047 Amster- 
dam Avenue, New York 25, N. Y. 



News from the Branches 

St. James, Hendersonville: Members 
of the Auxiliary took courses at Kanuga 
in Altar Guild, Christian Education, and 
Youth Work. The branch held its an- 



Transfiguration, Saluda 

Improvements totaling $2000 have 
been effected at the Church of the 
Transfiguration according to recent re- 
port of the past 12 month period. Among 
the improvements: cellar completely en- 
closed and oil furnace installed; Sanc- 
tuary and chancel enlarged, refloored, 
and refinished; chancel screen brought 
forward to make room for choir stalls; 
completely new electrical wiring circuits 
and inside illumination; lavatory and 
plumbing facilities installed. 



NEW VICE-CHANCELLOR 
AT SEWANEE 

Dr. Edward McCrady, chief of the 
Biology Division of the Atomic Energy 
Commission, Oak Ridge, and a man 
whose name is well recorded in Se- 
wanee history, will become acting vice 
chancellor of the University of the South 
September 1. He will succeed Dr. Boyls- 
ton Green, who tendered his resignation 
to the board of regents at their August 
16 meeting called by Chairman Edmund 
Orgill of Memphis to consider minor 
administrative matters left over from the 
June commencement session. 

The son of the late Dr. Edward Mc- 
Cray, who received a B.A. degree from 
Sewanee in 1889 and an honorary doc- 
tor of divinity degree in 1927, the new 
vice chancellor had taught at the Epis- 
copal college more than 10 years as 
head of the biology department before 
taking a leave of absence in the fall of 
1948 to become senior biologist for the 
U. S. Atomic Energy Commission at 
Oak Ridge. 

A lay reader in the Episcopal Church 
and licensed to deliver his own sermons, 
Dr. McCrady has taught courses at the 
Kanuga (N. C.) Summer Conference 
and is much in demand in diocesan and 
other church gatherings throughout the 
South. 

Dr. McCrady received his B.A. degree 
in 1927 from the College of Charleston, 
where he majored in Greek. Becoming 
interested in biology while working in 
the Charleston museum, he specialized 
in genetics in securing his master's de- 
gree from the University of Pittsburgh. 
He received his doctorate from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, where he con- 
centrated on the anatomy of the ear. 
In 1937 he was invited to speak at a 
symposium on hearing at Sorbonne Un- 
iversity in Paris, and came to Sewanee 
in the fall of that year. He is a past 
president of the Tennessee Academy of 
Science. 

A versatile man, Dr. McCrady is 
skilled also in portrait painting, wood 
carving, violin playing, mt. climbing. 



EARLY DAYS OF ST. PHILIPS, 

BREVARD 

Chapters in Diocesan History 

It was through visits and ministra- 
tions of Dr. Hillhouse Buel that a con- 
gregation was formed at Brevard. He 
was the director of the Ravenscroft As- 
sociate Mission, which meant one or two 
priests associated with him and living 
in Asheville, their interests being in car- 
ing for congregations of our Church 
people, whether near to or at distances 
from Asheville. There might or might 
not be a Church building in which the 
congregations worshipped. Several es- 
tablished Mission Churches have result- 
ed from the interests of missionaries. A 
parish has been the result at Brevard. 
Bishop Atkinson and Bishop Lyman 
made visits there with Dr. Buel as early 
as 1873, before there was a Church 
building, on one occasion, possibly on 
others, having services in the Methodist 
Chapel. Services were also held in the 
Court House, the first one, which was 
built in 1874, and in a public hall. The 
corner-stone of the Church, a wooden 
structure, was laid August 7th, 1883, the 
lot having been given by Mrs. Robert W. 
Hume and her children. It was eight 
years, however, before the building was 
completed, the consecration taking place 
Oct. 20, 1891 by Bishop Lyman, al- 
though the Church had been used for 
several years. The diocesan journal of 
1888 reports 20 communicants. In 1887 
Bishop Lyman reports of his visit the 
previous year, "It was the first time I 
had officiated in the new and tasteful 
Church, which is not yet entirely com- 
pleted. We have a small band of 
Church workers there and they are not 
able without assistance to do what their 
hearts are yearning to accomplish." 

The final value of the Church was 
stated as $3,000.00 and its seating capac- 
ity 120 person's. After Dr. Buel's re- 
tirement from his active ministry Rev. 
Scott B. Rathbun carried on at St. 
Philip's, and Mr. Albert Jenkins served 
as a lay-reader. 

There is a previous history of St. Phil- 



5 



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ip's, which concerns a Church known as 
St. Paul's in the Valley, some three 
miles east of Brevard. Here there was 
a settlement of families coming for the 
summertime from the lower lands of 
Charleston and South Carolina, like the 
settlement some years previous at Flat 
Rock, not many miles distant. We have 
the names of ones who built homes: Dr. 
Hugh Rutledge, Henry Ewbank, John 
Gadsden and Albert Jenkins. A con- 
gregation of the Church was organized 
in July, 1856, by the families of the 
above, except that of the Jenkins', who 
arrived soon after. #1650.00 was raised 
for a Church building. Bishop Atkinson 
visited here in August, 1856. Before the 
Church was completed, a frame building, 
Rev. J. S. Hanckel had joined forces 
with the laity, and began to hold services 
in the carriage shed of Mr. Johnstone 
Sunday mornings, and at the Methodist 
Camp-ground in the afternoons. He 
was a professor at the South Carolina 
Theological Seminary at Camden, and 
purchased a home for summer purpose 
in the valley. St. Paul's was used only 
for four or five months in the summer, 
used for the first time in 1857 and con- 
secrated by Bishop Atkinson in 1860. A 
report for 1858 gives 26 communicants, 
half of whom were "visitors," so given. 

In August 1859 there were 4 confirmed. 
During the years of the Civil War 
Church life ceased, the settlement brok- 
en up. Mr. Hanckel took all altar ves- 
sels and books to Camden, putting them 
in the care of the Church there. Not 
until 1873 were these brought back to 
St. Paul's by Dr. D. H. Buel of Ashe- 
ville, and I find no revival of Church 
services until then. In 1875, thirty-eight 
dollars was spent on repairs of the 
Church. And in 1878 Bishop Lyman 
made a visitation. Services continued 
being held until 1884 or '85. 

The families of St. Paul's in the Val- 
ley transferred their interest to the build- 
ing of the Church in Brevard. We find 
gifts for it made by Albert Jenkins, Dr. 
C. W. Hunt, Henry Ewbank, John A. 
Gadsden, the Johnstones and others, as 
also by "friends in Charleston, Wilm- 



ington, Asheville, New York and Bos- 
ton." St. Paul's in the Valley was in 
time removed. There was a graveyard 
about the Church, which can still be 
found among the old trees on a hillside, 
by entering a gate, taking Rt. 276 from 
Brevard. There have been burials there 
in recent years. Rev. Chalmers D. 
Chapman who was rector of St. Philip's 
from 1916 to 1926 is buried there. 

The building of St. Philip's followed 
the building of the present Court House 
and the forming of a Court Square by 
only a few years. The County of Tran- 
sylvania had been formed from Hender- 
son County during Civil War days. 
There was the same native stock, Eng- 
lish and Scotch-Irish, as in other parts 
of Western North Carolina, farming be- 
ing their chief interest. In the 1880's 
Brevard had less than a thousand of the 
native population. Dr. Buel made regu- 
lar visits for services at St. Philip's, driv- 
ing from Asheville. He writes that the 
Church at Brevard was "begun as an 
act of faith. We were a few scattered 
sheep needing a fold, and God has an- 
swered our prayers by crowning our ef- 
forts with success. To Him be all the 
glory and to us the blessing." 

— The Rev. J. B. Sill. 



Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek 

The Woman's Auxiliary of Trinity 
Chapel, Haw Creek, in cooperation with 
the church committee sponsored a pic- 
nic August 23. Supper was served on 
the lawn and was followed by a service 
of Evening Prayer. 

After the service entertainment in the 
form of a square dance was held in the 
parish house. During the evening the 
Claxton School square dance team gave 
some exhibition square dances. 

Mr. Porter Crisp, lay vicar in charge 
of the chapel, gave an address at the 
monthly meeting of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary on the development of a Young 
Peoples Service League in the church 
after which the members of the auxil- 
iary voted unanimously to sponsor such 
a program. The first activity to be held 
will be a hay ride Sept. 6. 



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TRINITY CHURCH, Ashevlle, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also jt 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A. M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



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PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



SKY VALLEY 

• Accredited preparatory school. 

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• Atmosphere and influences of the Epis- 
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Sky Valley School Zirconia. N. C. 



THE PHrTERMW'SCttQBt^fSffS 




A Church School of the Diocese of Western 
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tffihe]|tgF)lanb 
Cnurcljman 




VOL. XXII ? * 



OCTOBER, 1951 



No. 11 




The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



®tje 3ftgfjlait& 
QUjurrlfmatt 

339 Charlotte St. Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
1 lenry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest. Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Gale D. Webbe Editor 

The Rev. Mark Tenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville, N. C. 
Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park. Asheville. N. C. 



WHY MISSIONS? 

First: Look at your own congregation. 

WHO COMPOSES IT? Probably 
less than half of the present members 
were baptized, trained and confirmed 
in it. 

WHERE DO THE MEMBERS 
COME FROM? They come from 
churches in other towns. 

They come in large numbers from 
missions that you are asked to support. 
So, without missions, your congregation 
would be weaker. 

WHERE DO THE PEOPLE WHO 
MOVE FROM YOUR CONGREGA- 
TION GO? 

To schools, where you are asked to 
support chaplains. 

To the Army, where you are asked 
to aid and support chaplains. 

To another town, or a rural area, 
where you are asked to support a mis- 
sion. 

Second: Look at your world: 

DO YOU WANT IT TO CON- 
TINUE AS IT IS? (Need I answer?) 



ARE YOU WILLING TO GIVE 
MEN NEW HOPE? (NEED I AN- 
SWER THIS?) 

WHAT ARE YOU DOING? Through 
the Program of the Church you can do 
much toward realizing God's rule upon 
earth. 

Third: Look at yourself. 

IN BAPTISM, WITH WHAT 
WERE YOU SIGNED? "With the 
sign of the cross in token that hereafter 
you shall not be ashamed of the faith 
of Christ Crucified, and manfully to 
fight under his banner against sin, the 
world and the devil, and to continue 
Christ's faithful soldier unto my life's 
end." 

WHAT SORT OF SOLDIER ARE 
YOU? Some soldiers follow their own 
ideas, and disregard commands. This 
is called mutiny. Some change the 
ideas to suit themselves. This often is 
treason. Some obey. These are the 
faithful soldiers. 

Fourth: Look at God. 

WHAT DOES HE COMMAND? 
"Go ye into all the world." 

WHAT IS HIS PRAYER? "That 
they all may be one." 

WHAT HAS HE DONE? "He has 
redeemed me and all mankind." 

WHY MISSIONS? Because God 
wills, because I am commanded, because 
the world is sick and needs, because 
thereby I strengthen the Church at 
home and throughout the world. 



A calendar of prayer for Missions is 
designed to encourage daily interces- 
sions for the Church's missionaries at 
home and overseas. Arranged in the 
form of a calendar running from Oc- 
tober, 1951, through September, 1952, 
it lists all missionaries supported in 
whole or in part by the National Coun- 
cil. Indispensable for individual or 
group use, it is popularly priced at 

Twenty-jive cents a copy 
THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 
281 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 



LAYMEN WILL BE POWERFUL 
FORCE IN 1951 CANVASS 

Again the Laymen's Training Pro- 
gram will provide a powerful force in 
the 1951 Every Member Canvass. 

This year, as in the past, the selected 
laymen trained in our diocese have re- 
ceived thorough instruction on the 
world work of the Church. They have 
also had a complete course of training 
on the work in our own diocese. Thus 
they are qualified to speak with author- 
ity on all of the phases of the Church's 
work. 

This year the entire presentation is 
confined to less than thirty minutes. 
The layman you invite to your parish 
will not attempt to cover in detail all 
phases of the diocesan and world work 
of the Church. He will speak force- 
fully upon the new developments in the 
world work and the missionary objec- 
tives of our own diocese. 

The laymen trained in our diocese 
have been thoroughly schooled in the 
proper delivery. They will not read 
the message they have to give. 

Eighty-three other dioceses and mis- 
sionary districts, including Honolulu 
have accepted the Laymen's Training 
Plan this year, and the present outlook 
is that more than 2,200 laymen have 
received the training. 



"What Shall I Give?" 

The question "What shall I give to- 
ward the support of the Church?" comes 
up annually in connection with the Ev- 
ery Member Canvass. 

The answer that the United States 
Government gives to the question is sub- 
stantially this: "Knowing that this na- 
tion cannot continue to grow in spirit 
without its people supporting the work 
of their churches, their hospitals, their 
homes for the aged and infirm, and so 
forth, you may give for these purposes 
15% of your gross income and deduct 
it before taxes." 

The answer of the ancient Jewish 
church, and of many modern denomi- 
nations, is about this: "Devote 10% 



of net income (after income taxes) to 
the support of the church." 

The answer of several dioceses in the 
Episcopal Church is about like this: 
"Let every Episcopalian devote 5% of 
net income after taxes to the support 
of the Church, and another 5% for gen- 
eral charities like the Community 
Chest, the Red Cross, and so forth." 

The writer of this article rather fights 
shy of the idea of the same fixed per- 
centage for all sizes of families and for 
all income brackets. He would prefer 
to put the matter this way: 

When you make a pledge to the 
Church you are not giving to your own 
parish, to the diocese of Western North 
Carolina, and to the work of the Na- 
tional Church. You are giving it to 
God. And giving to God should be in 
return for what He has given you. 

What has God given you? Quite 
simply, everything. 

The world, with all the resources 
in it. Life, with all its capacities and 
endowments. Love and friendship, 
kindness and understanding. The mind, 
the abilities, the will-power and the 
strength which you have used to achieve 
whatever material success you enjoy 
in this world. The people, the objects, 
the ideals, the ends that make this suc- 
cess worth having. The very God to 
Whom we turn in prayer for strength in 
our weakness, help in our troubles, 
and peace in our sorrows. The risen 
Son of God, and our hope of eternal 
life. Once again, and quite simply, 
everything. 

There is, in short, no such thing as a 
self-made man, even, in this world. 
(Let alone in the world to come). Ev- 
erybody has received his entire capital 
investment from God, and his entire 
time, wisdom, and strength to put that 
capital to use. If you went to the bank 
for money, the tools, and the buildings 
to set up a business from which you 
gain #5,000 a year, the bank would 
charge you 5% on an unsecured loan 
(and you and I are certainly "unse- 
cured loans" in the eyes of God.) 



3 



Surely, then, you and I are consider- 
able ingrates if in return for what God 
has given us we give him back a paltry, 
beggarly, amount. An amount far be- 
low what we pay for cigarettes, soda- 
pop, the Country Club, lipstick, and the 
evening highball. An amount, indeed, 
that is more in answer to the question 
"How little shall I give?" than to "How 
much shall I give?" 

The only measure of giving to God 
is the measure of what we have received 
from Him. If the matter of God's 
bounty is honestly faced, the question 
"What shall I give toward the support 
of the Church?" will be honestly an- 
swered. 



Giving 

Episcopal Church giving has gone up 
from #25 per year per member in 1930 
to $29 per year per member in 1950. 
This is not an increase, in terms of buy- 
ing power, but a catastrophic decline. It 
represents the fact that the place of the 
Church in the family budget is consid- 
erably smaller than it was a decade ago. 
And because people pay for what they 
value, it means that the Church is worth 
less to its old established members than 
it was a decade ago. 



Leadership 

The training of leadership is essen- 
tial to the life of the Church. It requires 
the same patience and perseverance ex- 
ercised by our Lord in the training of 
the Disciples . Vocations are the gift 
of God; but provision for their realiza- 
tion is the responsibility of the Church. 



HOLY CROSS, TRYON 

In the September 30th issue of the 
Episcopal Church Times, there is an 
article of interest to the congregation 
of Holy Cross. It is written by the Rev. 
William S. Lea, and called "The Test 
of Discipleship," found on page 10. Mr. 
Lea is well remembered by most of the 
congregation as he has often preached 
there. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION MOVES 
TO GREENWICH QUARTERS 

28 Havemeyer Place, Greenwich, 
Conn., will become as well-known to 
church people as 281 Fourth Ave., New 
York 10, N. Y., the address of Church 
Missions House. 28 Havemeyer Place 
is the new address of the Department 
of Christian Education of the National 
Council. 

In this pleasant, two-story building, 
located near the center of town, the Di- 
visions of the Department have been 
brought together from New York and 
a former address in Greenwich. 



YOUTH SUNDAY 

Youth Sunday is October 21 this year, 
observed as a symbol, of "That holy fel- 
lowship" and of youth's united efforts 
for Christ and His Church as the young 
people of the Church seek to know the 
Christ and make Him known. 

At the Youth Sunday services held 
in great numbers of parishes and mis- 
sions in this country, Canada and var- 
ious other countries in which the 
Church's youth program is used, the 
young people will rededicate themselves 
so that in all these areas an opportunity 
will be given to see the power of Youth 
united for Christ. 

Youth of the Church share in the 
United Youth Offering. The National 
Youth Commission chose to u.se the 
1951 Offering for the educational, med- 
ical and evangelistic work of the Holy 
Cross Mission at Bolahun, Liberia. 

In many parishes young people will 
take part in the Church services held 
on Youth Sunday. It is not unusual 
in some parishes for a young person to 
make the address, using the opportuni- 
ty to tell of the work young people are 
doing locally and worldwide for the ex- 
tension of Christ's Kingdom. Parents 
and other adults see young people in 
action and are reminded of the very 
real role that they play in the church 
in action every day. 






TO HELP LIBERIA MISSION 

The object of the United Youth Of- 
fering, which will be received on Youth 
Sunday, October 21, is the work of the 
Holy Cross Mission in the interior of 
Liberia. 

Overcoming the old spirit of fear and 
suspicion by the message of love through 
the Church is the task of the medical, 
educational, and evangelistic work of the 
Holy Cross Mission and its many out- 
stations. Through the United Youth 
Offering some basic improvements will 
be made in the mission property. The 
work will provide employment for work- 
men for a period of years and insure 
more permanent facilities for the mis- 
sion such as metal roofed houses for 
teachers, a chapel for St. Agnes Girls' 
School, a reliable water system at the 
mission, and covered wells with hand 
pumps at the outstations. 

CHURCH WOMEN AGAIN SPONSOR 
WORLD COMMUNITY DAY 

''Live thy faith" will be the theme of 
World Community Day, to be held No- 
vember 2. Sponsored annually by the 
General Department of United Church 
Women of the XCCC, the purpose of the 
day is to encourage women to work to- 
gether for a more Christian world order. 

Each year, special projects are chosen 
to be a part of the day's observance. 
This year they are the provision of 
blankets for needy persons and contrib- 
utions toward ecumenical scholarships, 
which will make it possible for young 
people from many lands to obtain spec- 
ialized training in preparation for more 
effective leadership in their homeland 
churches and communities. 



FROM HOLY CROSS, TRYON 

"If after kirk you bide a wee, 
There's some would like to speak to ye: 
If after kirk you rise and flee, 
We'll all seem cold and stiff to ye: 
The one that's in the seat with ye 
Is stranger here than you, maybe." 



HOW CAN WE AS PARENTS HELP 
IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION? 

We can teach with every minute Par- 
ents are teaching all the time, whether 
they are aware of it or not. The found- 
ation for his belief in a God of Love, 
and a just God, are laid long before the 
child goes to Sunday School. He learns 
through his experience of steady human 
affection and of dependable guidance. 

Do we laugh at the child one day and 
punish him the next for doing the same 
thing? Are we exploring our children 
as objects for the gratification of our 
pride? 

We can read. Is our own spiritual 
life growing? Do we know more about 
the Bible than we did ten years ago? 
Are we equipped to answer our chil- 
dren's questions about God, prayer, 
death? Why not ask the rector to re- 
commend some helpful books? 

We can worship. Do we say grace at 
meals? If not, why not begin this 
week? How do our children pray? Is 
our own prayer life growing? Do we 
worship in church or do we merely 
send our children? 

We can show interest in what the 
child is doing in Sunday School. Do we 
know his teacher? We can watch our 
conversation and probe our prejudices. 
If they hear us, the most important 
persons in their lives, giving vent to re- 
marks showing suspicion and dislike for 
peoples of other races and faiths, we 
are undermining much of what the 
Church is striving to do. 

We can let our rector know of our 
desire to help and go to him for advice. 
He needs parents who will prepare 
themselves to give their interest, talent, 
and time to the creation of a parish fel- 
lowship in which all children can grow 
into closer relationship with God. 

Let us ask ourselves as Christian 
parents, Are we doing our part? 

— From Churchways. 



PROVINCE OF SEWANEE HOLDS 
SUCCESSFUL CONFERENCE 
ON CHURCH MUSIC 

The first conference on Church Mus- 
ic, sponsored by the Province of Se- 
wanee, was held at DuBose Conference 
Center, Monteagle, Tenn., July 17th- 
26th. Fifty-four organists and choir- 
masters from eleven dioceses attended. 
The response to the sessions was so en- 
thusiastic that it was unanimously 
agreed by all concerned to make this 
conference an annual feature of the life 
of the province. 

Courses of instruction were given on 
the Prayer Book and the Hymnal by 
the Rev. Massey H. Shepherd, Jr. of 
Episcopal Theological School, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; on chanting by Mr. Rob- 
ert L. Hobbs, organist-choirmaster of 
St. Mark's, Louisville, Ky.; and on 
choir-training and service music by Mr. 
Robert L. Van Doren, organist-choir- 
master of Trinity, Columbia, S. C. The 
conference chorus was directed by Dr. 
Lyman P. Prior, choirmaster of St. 
John's Cathedral, Jacksonville, Fla. 
The conference chorus was directed by 
Dr. Lyman P. Prior, choirmaster of St. 
John's Cathedral, Jacksonville, Fla. The 
chaplain of the conference was the Rev. 
Cyril N. Sturrup, rector of St. Paul's, 
Winter Haven, Fla. Also assisting in 
the devotional life of the conference were 
Bishops Dandridge and Barth of Ten- 
nessee and Bishop McElwain, retired, 
of Minnesota. 

The aim of this conference was to 
assist our church musicians, especially 
in the smaller parishes and missions, 
to use simple music of good quality and 
liturgical fitness in the corporate wor- 
ship of the Church. Hymns, service 
music, and anthems, chosen for study by 
the conference, were all selected to this 
end. The response of those attending 
the sessions was so overwhelmingly fav- 
orable, that it is expected that next 
year the registrations for the confer- 
ence will be greatly increased. 



The second Sewanee Summer Con- 
ference on Church Music will be held 
July 15-24, 1952, at DuBose Conference 
Center, Monteagle, Tennessee. 



BISHOP DUNN TO ADDRESS SYNOD 

The Bishop of Washington will be 
special speaker when the Synod of the 
Fourth Province meets in Birmingham 
this month. The Church of the Ad- 
vent will be host. Synod will be called 
to order at 2:30 p. m. October 23rd, 
and will adjourn the next day. 

There will be six work-shop groups 
into which Synod membership will be 
divided: Missions and Church Exten- 
sion, Christian Education, College 
Work, Christian Social Relations, Pro- 
motion, and Finance. Groups will be 
organized soon after Synod convenes. 

Provincial Council will meet the 
morning of October 23rd. 

Hotels in Birmingham: Molton, Tut- 
wiler, Redmont are close to the Church 
of the Advent; Bankhead, Thomas Jef- 
ferson, Granada are within easy walk- 
ing distance. Recommended motor 
courts are the Vulcan Motor Lodge, 
Roebuck Motels, Shamrock Motor 
Lodge. 

Accommodations for Negroes include 
Palm Leaf Hotel and the Y. M. C. A. 

Reservations should be made early, 
and direct to hotel. 



"God must love the small church be- 
cause He made so many of them," said 
Douglass H. Atwill, retired bishop of 
North Dakota, in an article written for 
the Rural Worker's Fellowship. 

Small churches often make great con- 
tributions to the lay activities of city 
parishes as well as to the ministry of 
churches all over the world. "Thank 
God for the small church," Bishop At- 
will said, "for the patience, courage, 
loyalty and devotion which this source 
supplies to the Church in the nation for 
the enhancement and the enrichment of 
life." 



RUSSELL E. DILL DIES 



THE EPISCOPAL HOUR FOR 1951 



Russell E. Dill, Treasurer of the Do- 
mestic and Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church and 
of the Church's National Council, died 
at his home, Big Wolf Lake, Faust, N. 
Y., after a long illness. 

He was 57 years old and is survived 
by Mrs. Dill and one son, George Post 
Dill. 

Mr. Dill was born in San Jose, Cali- 
fornia. He attended the University of 
California, majoring in economics. He 
made a special study of the textile in- 
dustry also, and was for a time the 
head of a large textile organization. 

In 1930 he became a specialist on the 
reorganization of industrial companies, 
serving in this capacity with large de- 
partment stores, motor companies and 
an aircraft company. During World 
War II he was sent to England to con- 
fer with Army authorities concerning 
confidential matters in regard to aerial 
warfare. He served as chairman of the 
Westchester (N.Y.) rationing board, 
and later was called to Washington to 
assist in the preparation of the initial 
rationing program by Leon Henderson. 

Mr. Dill was widely traveled, and for 
many years had been interested in the 
world-wide missionary program of the 
Church. He was an organist, having 
been both choirmaster and organist at 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, San 
Francisco for a number of years. He 
was an active member and former ves- 
tryman of Christ Episcopal Church, 
Bronxville, N. Y. 

He joined the national organization 
of the Episcopal Church as Treasurer 
in 1948. 



FREE! 

Certificates of Baptism and of Con- 
firmation . . . both bearing the Seal of 
the Diocese . . . may be obtained, free 
of charge, upon application to the 
Bishop. 



presents 

Outstanding Speakers on Timely 

Subjects. 

October 28 — "Our Relationship to 
Christ." The Rt. Rev. John E. Hines, 
Bishop Coadjutor of Texas. 

November 4 — "Christ Makes New 
Men." The Rev. Armand T. Eyler, St. 
James' Church, Greeneville, Tenn. 

November 11 — "Honor to the Brave." 
The Very Rev. Arnold M. Lewis, St. 
John's Cathedral, Jacksonville, Fla. 

November 18 — "The Grace of Our 
Lord Jesus Christ." The Rt. Rev. F. D. 
Goodwin, Bishop of Virginia. 

November 25 — ■ "For Fractional 
Lives'" The Rev. Ray Holder, Christ 
Church, Raleigh, N. C. 

December 2 — "New Men in a New 
Age." The Rev. A. Ronald Merrix, St. 
James' Church, Macon, Ga. 

December 9 — "How to Read Your 
Bible." The Rev. Richard H. Wilmer, 
Jr., Chaplain, University of the South, 
Sewanee, Tenn. 

December 16 — "To Prepare His 
Ways." The Rev. Thomas R. Thrash- 
er, Church of The Ascension, Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 

December 23 — "God's Greatest Mes- 
sage." The Rt. Rev. Everett Holland 
Jones, Bishop of West Texas. 

December 30 — "Newness in Life." 
The Rev. George M. Alexander, Trini- 
ty Church, Columbia, S. C. 



REORGANIZATION 

Plans for the reorganization of the 
Southern Churchman have reached 
the point of a public announcement. 
With the name, Episcopal Churchnews, 
the first issue is scheduled for Decem- 
ber 2d. Owned by a non-profit corpor- 
ation to which the Southern Churchman 
Company is turning over its assets, the 
magazine is expected to have 36 pages 
weekly and an annual budget of $250,- 
000. 




DIOCESSAN 
FAMILY 
Black 
Mountain 



Mr. Winfield D. Smith is now resid- 
ing in Black Mountain as the layman- 
in-charge of St. James' Church and the 
patients in the nearby hospitals and 
Sanitoria. 

Mr. Smith was born in Lead, South 
Dakota, but was reared at Wentworth, 
North Carolina, and received the degree 
of A.B. and M.A. from the University 
of North Carolina. He attended the 
Episcopal Theological School in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., for the years 1947-49, 
and is now finishing his theological 
training under the examining chaplains 
of the Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lin.a 

After being a teacher in the public 
schools of Gastonia, North Carolina, he 
was advanced to be principal of John 
S. Henderson School in Salisbury. For 
fourteen months, he was minister to St. 
John's Church in Holbrook, Mass. The 
years 1942-46 were spent in Military 
Intelligence, at Hickam Field, H. I. 

Although not born in North Carolina, 
Mr. Smith seems to have his heart 
firmly planted in this State. He mar- 
ried Miss Lois Wilson who was reared 
at Madison, N. C, and received the 
degree of A.B. from Guilford College 
and her B.S. in Library Science from 
the University of North Carolina. She 
has been Librarian of the Public High 
School in Gastonia, N. C, as well as of 
the High School of Weston, Mass. 

The Smiths have two small children, 
Alice Jeanette and Pamela Jane. 



St. Matthias', Asheville 

A great forward step was made in the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina 
when the Rev. Munroe C. DeVan ac- 
cepted the call to become Rector of St. 
Matthias' Church on October first. He is 
the first inhabitant of the new rectory 
of the only Negro Parish in the diocese 
and comes to it from St. Paul's Church, 
Philadelphia. The diocese looks for- 
ward eagerly to his leadership and wel- 
comes the latest addition to its clerical 
family. 

ST. MARY'S, ASHEVILLE 

On the Feast of St. Michael and All 
Angels, in the course of the Mass at 
St. Mary's Church, Asheville, Bishop 
Henry consecrated a new memorial 
Chalice and Paten, to the glory of God 
and in loving memory of Frances Hope 
Leavitt. The new Chalice and Paten, 
hand-made by Glasier and Company of 
New York City, are the gift of Dr. 
Louise Perry of Asheville. 

Mrs. Leavitt, who died on June 11, 
was immediate Past President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of St. Mary's Par- 
ish, and has held many Diocesan and 
Provincial offices in the Auxiliary. Her 
services to the Church for more than a 
quarter of a century cannot be meas- 
ured. Her death means the loss, to this 
world, of a great character, a tireless 
worker, an indominable spirit, a trusted 
counsellor, a wise guide, a courageous 
leader, a fine lady, a magnificent church 
woman. 

May she rest in peace, and may light 
perpetual shine upon her. 



ST. JAMES' WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
HOLDS MEETING 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of St. James', Le- 
noir, was held Monday evening Sep- 
tember 3rd in the Parish House. A de- 
licious supper was enjoyed by all mem- 
bers present. 

Mrs. E. L. Kemper, Diocesan Presi- 
dent, was the speaker and gave most 
interesting and inspiring talk. 



8 



ST. GEORGE'S RECEIVES GIFT 

The Rev. and Mrs. Roy Grobb pre- 
sented to the congregation of St. 
George's, West Asheville, a Paten, Cha- 
lice, and Ciborium. These vessels were 
consecrated on the occasion of the Bish- 
op's visit to St. George's on Sunday, 
September 30th. The Rev. Mr. Grobb 
has been regularly celebrating the Holy 
Communion for this new Church, and 
his gift must have been the result of 
the warm relationship that has develop- 
ed between the congregation and him. 

There were twelve persons confirmed 
on the occasion of the Bishop's visit, 
bringing the total for the year to twenty- 
four. 



THANKSGIVING OFFERING 
FOR THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 

The Thompson Orphanage has found 
a place in the hearts of Church people; 
the church people of North Carolina are 
"Orphanage conscious." As each year 
passes our people become more and more 
loyal to the Orphanage and more con- 
scious of the needs of the children who 
find a home there. The annual Thanks- 
giving Offering has increased to the 
point where it has become a steady 
source of support for the Orphanage. 

Today as the Orphanage carries on its 
work of providing a home for its Fam- 
ily of seventy-six children, the Thomp- 
son Orphanage begins each day's work 
with the secure and comforting knowl- 
edge that all over the state hundreds 
of people have the welfare and lives of 
the children at heart. 

And yet, the continued support and 
prayers of the people are necessary if 
the work of the Orphanage is to con- 
tinue. The responsibility of the Or- 
phanage rests in the hearts of every 
church member of our diocese. The 
Orphanage is depending on the Thanks- 
giving Offering to meet the many ex- 
penses of caring for the children com- 
mitted to the care of the church. 



ANNUAL HOMECOMING 
AT WOODSIDE 

The annual Home Coming of the 
Church of Our Saviour, Woodside, on 
Sunday, September 9th, 1951, will long 
be remembered. 

The weather was everything to be de- 
sired, and a special pleasure was the 
privilege of having the Reverend N. C. 
Duncan, of Asheville, as guest preacher. 

Mrs. Duncan and many out of town 
guests were present, with a good repre- 
sentation from Woodside and St. Luke's 
in Lincolnton. 

A special guest was Mrs. St. George 
L. Sioussat of Chevy Chase, Md., the 
former Miss Julia Richardson, and 
daughter of the late Mrs. John Rich- 
ardson of Woodside, who first started 
a Sunday School there. 

Of special interest to those present 
was the lovely new Bible which the 
congregation of the Church of Our 
Saviour had purchased. 

The Altar was very beautiful with 
white gladiola and a white and gold 
altar cloth. Mixed late summer flow- 
ers were used on the organ. 

The Service was opened by the Rev. 
Richard J. Lee, Rector. 

A most enjoyable picnic supper was 
served under the trees after the ser- 
vice. 



MRS. MYRA SUMNER SMITH 

The death of Mrs. Myra Sumner 
Smith, daughter of the late Mr. and 
Charles McBee Sumner, on July 19th, 
1951, has caused an irreparable loss to 
St. Luke's Church and Parish. 

Mrs. Smith was the first child to be 
baptized in the new Church in Lincoln- 
ton some 65 years ago. She had been 
a long and faithful member, active in 
every church branch. Regardless of 
heat or cold, Myra Sumner Smith nev- 
er shirked her duty to her Church. She 
was an active and faithful worker in 
the Women's Auxiliary. 

St. Luke's of Lincolnton will long 
mourn her loss, and revere her mem- 
ory. 




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Year in and Year Out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



TRINITY CHURCH, Ashevlle, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also jt 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
9:45. Men's Bible Class, 10 A. M. Nursery 
School, 11 A.M. Holy Communion and Spe- 
cial Prayers each Friday at 11 A. M. 



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Remember, You Always Save 
at B elk's 



A LETTER FROM THE 
BISHOP OF GEORGIA 

I spent two weeks during the middle 
and latter part of July, giving a course 
of lectures at Kanuga. Kanuga is four 
miles out of Hendersonville, in the 
North Carolina hills. It is cool and pleas- 
ant. More than three hundred leaders 
of parish work were there, and courses 
were given by various leaders of the 
national church in almost every form of 
church activity. 

Kanuga is owned by the five Carolina 
dioceses, but the members of the con- 
ference come from all over the South. 
From Maryland to Texas, was represent- 
ed. The diocese with the largest attend- 
ance was Louisiana. This shows the 
broad appeal Kanuga makes, and it 
also shows the help our people receive 
when they have to limit the attendance 
of any person to three successive years, 
so that others may have a chance to 
share. It is crowded to capacity like this 
year after year, with a waiting list. 

The National Church will always 
send, and does send men and women 
who are "tops" in their fields and we 
cannot hope to get such leadership to 
come to our many and smaller Diocesan 
Camps. I think of Kanuga as a sort of 
post-graduate school which serves the 
Church on a higher and Provincial lev- 
el. At Kanuga we can develop, and are 
developing our own Diocesan leaders, 
who tomorrow will be giving courses 
and conducting classes on the level of 
the diocese. And this is how the dio- 
ceses whose people go to Kanuga benefit. 

Middleton S. Barnwell, 
Bishop of Georgia. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



10 



GOD'S SHARE 

The Diocese of Maryland, after considerable study, has put forth this table 
of suggested weekly contributions to the Church. We reprint it here for your 
earnest consideration. 

Suggested minimum weekly contribution to the Church 



Ann 


lal 






Self an 


d one 


Self an 


i two 


Self and three 


Self and Four 


Income 


Self only 


dependent 


dependents 


depen 


lents 


dependents 


, 1.000 - 


$ 1,500 


$ .15- 


$ .85 


$ .10- 


.25 


$ .10- 


$ .10 


$ .10- 


$ .10 


$ .10- 


.10 


1.500 - 


2.000 


.85 - 


1.75 


.25 - 


.65 


.10- 


.10 


.10- 


.10 


.10- 


.10 


2.000 - 


2,500 


1.75 - 


2.90 


.65 - 


1.05 


.10- 


.50 


.10- 


.10 


.10- 


.10 


2.500 - 


3,000 


2.90- 


4.30 


1.05 - 


1.55 


.50- 


.90 


.10- 


.55 


.10- 


.10 


3.000 - 


3.500 


4.30 - 


5.00 


1.55 - 


2.10 


.90- 


1.40 


.Si - 


1.10 


.10- 


.75 


3.500- 


4.000 


5.00 - 


5.75 


2.10- 


2.75 


1.40- 


2.00 


1.10- 


1.65 


.75- 


1.25 


4.000 - 


4.500 


5.75 - 


6.50 


2.75- 


3.50 


2.00- 


2.70 


1.65- 


2.30 


1.25- 


1.85 


4.500 - 


5.000 


6.50- 


7.20 


3.50- 


4.35 


2.70- 


3.55 


2.30 - 


3.10 


1.85 - 


2.60 


5.000 - 


5,500 


7.20- 


7.90 


4.35 - 


5.30 


3.55 - 


4.45 


3.10- 


4.00 


2.60- 


3.45 


5.500 - 


6.000 


7.90- 


8.65 


5.30- 


6.35 


4.45 - 


5.55 


4.00- 


5.00 


3.45 - 


4.40 


6.000 - 


7.000 


8.65 - 


10.00 


6.35 - 


8.75 


5.55 - 


8.05 


5.00- 


7.40 


4.40- 


6.70 


7.000 - 


8.000 


10.10- 


11.50 


8.75 - 


10.00 


8.05 - 


9.20 


7.40- 


8.40 


6.70- 


7.70 


8.000 - 


9.000 


11.50- 


12.95 


10.00 - 


11.25 


9.20- 


10.35 


8.40- 


9.45 


7.70- 


8.65 


9.000 - 


10.000 


12.95 - 


14.40 


11.25 - 


12.50 


10.35 - 


11.50 


9.45- 


10.50 


8.65 - 


9.60 


10.000 - 


12.000 


14.40 - 


17.25 


12.50- 


15.00 


11.50- 


13.75 


10.50 - 


12.50 


9.60- 


11.50 


12.000 - 


14.000 


17.25 - 


20.25 


15.00- 


17.50 


13.75 - 


16.00 


12.50- 


14.75 


11.50- 


13.50 


14.000 - 


16.000 


20.25 - 


23.00 


17.50- 


20.00 


16.00 - 


18.50 


14.75 - 


16.75 


13.50 - 


15.25 


16.000 - 


18.000 


23.00- 


26.00 


20.00 - 


22.50 


18.50- 


20.75 


16.75 - 


19.00 


15.25 - 


17.25 


18.000 - 


20.000 


26.00 - 


28.75 


22.50 - 


25.00 


20.75 - 


23.00 


19.00 - 


21.00 


17.25 - 


19.25 


20.000 - 


25.000 


28.75 - 


36.00 


25.00 - 


31.25 


23.00- 


28.75 


21.00- 


26.25 


19.25 - 


24.00 


25.000 - 


30.000 


36.00- 


43.25 


31.25 - 


37.50 


28.75 - 


34.50 


26.25 - 


31.50 


24.00 - 


28.75 


30.000 - 


35.000 


43.25 - 


50.50 


37.50 - 


43.75 


34.50 - 


40.25 


31.50- 


36.75 


28.75 - 


33.50 


35.000- 


40.000 


50.50 - 


57.50 


43.75 - 


50.00 


40.25 - 


46.00 


36.75 - 


42.00 


33.50- 


38.50 


40.000 - 


45.000 


57.50 - 


64.75 


50.00 - 


56.25 


46.00 - 


51.75 


42.00 - 


47.25 


38.50 - 


43.25 


45.000 - 


50.000 


64.75- 


72.00 


56.25 - 


62.50 


51.75 - 


57.50 


47.25 - 


52.50 


43.25 - 


48.00 



50.000 - up 



.00144* 



.001: 



.0011; 



.00105« 



.00096* 



f Multiply annual income by figure found in appropriate column in order to 
arrive at suggested weekly figure. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



11 



CHAPTERS IN DIOCESAN HISTORY 

The Episcopal Church in Chunn's Cove 
St. Luke's Mission 

The first services held in Chunn's 
Cove was conducted by Dr. Jarvis Bux- 
ton on the second Sunday of June 1858 
at the home of Hosea Lindsey. Dr. 
Buxton rode horseback to these services 
and continued them on the second Sun- 
day of each month until winter. 

During the summer of 1867 services 
were conducted each Sunday at 3 o'clock. 
Dr. Buxton visited the sick, carried 
them provisions and cut their wood 
when the man of the family was sick. 
All baptisms and confirmations at that 
time took place at Trinity Church, Ashe- 
ville. 

In 1886 a Sunday School was organ- 
ized and conducted at the home of Mr. 
William Thomas Owen, he being a lay 
reader. He also held night services at 
his home. Many of the congregation 
at that time could neither read nor 
write. Mr. Owen was an Englishman 
by birth and had married Mary Lind- 
sey of this community. It was Mr. 
Owen's fondest hope to have a little 
Episcopal Church in Chunn's Cove and 
to that end he worked faithfully. 

In 1890 The Rev. Wm. F. Rice held 
services once a month under a weeping 
willow tree in the yard of Mrs. Martha 
Metz, and continued these services 
through 1891-92 and 1893. The Rev. 
William Barrows and The Rev. Samuel 
Rhoades (a Deacon ) assisted with the 
mission. 

In 1892 the Sunday School was moved 
to the home of Mrs. C. W. DeVault, in 
order to have music. Teachers came 
over from Trinity, Asheville. Among 
them Miss Josie Patton, (Mrs. Hay- 
wood Parker, now deceased), Miss Lil- 
ly McGregory, Miss Ellen Barker, Miss 
Minnie Bearden (now Mrs. Doble). 
Mr. Herbert D. Childs was superintend- 
ent of the Sunday School for a number 
of years. Mrs. C. E. Moody and Miss 



Flora Armstrong were also ardent work- 
ers in the Sunday School. 

During 1893 it was planned to build 
a church. Mr. Owen wanted to give a 
site for the church but it was decided 
to buy a lot more centrally located and 
a lot was purchased from Uncle Matt 
Baxter (colored) slave of Col. Stephen 
Lee. Mr. E. J. Armstrong furnished 
the plan for the church and although in 
ill health at the time he gave untir- 
ingly of his time and efforts in oversee- 
ing the construction of the same. The 
church was erected by subscription and 
a loan from the Church Building Fund 
during 1894 and was given the name 
ST. LUKE'S by Mr. Owen. 

The Rev. McNeelry DuBose (at that 
time Rector of Trinity Church, Ashe- 
ville,) gave and laid the cornerstone of 
St. Luke's, and assisted with services 
after completion of the church. 

St. Luke's was consecrated by Bish- 
op J. B. Cheeshire in 1898. 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rice continued in 
faithful charge of St. Luke's Mission, 
coming ten miles either by horseback 
or buggy through all sorts of weather, 
until the Bishop stationed him at St. 
James, Black Mountain. In the mean- 
time St. Luke's had become an organ- 
ized mission and was under the super- 
vision of the late Alfred Stubbs, who 
was ever ready and willing to come to 
St. Luke's when needed. 

The late Rev. Geo. H. Bell of Haw 
Creek was in charge of St. Luke's for 
some time following Mr. Rice. He was 
made a Deacon in 1892, Priested in 
1893 by Bishop T. B. Lyman, D. D., 
and devoted his life to Missionary Work- 
in the Western Counties of North Caro- 
lina. 

The Rev. Raymond A. Chapman 
served at St. Luke's from the spring 
of 1921 to October 1922 and the activi- 
ties of the Mission were very marked 
under his leadership. He resigned from 
St. Luke's and other missions he served 
near Asheville to become Vicar at St. 
Stephen's Church, Boston, Mass. 



12 



St. Luke's was then without a regu- 
lar priest until the Rev. Geo. J. Suth- 
erland came in 1924. Father Suther- 
land was also in charge of The Redeem- 
er, River Rd., at Craggy, and of St. 
James, Black Mountain, where he re- 
sided in the Rectory. He continued to 
serve these churches until his death in 
1934. 

In 1935 St. Luke's had The Rev. 
Frank W. Blackwelder as rector until 
some time in 1936. He was very young 
at the time, having completed his min- 
isterial studies with high honors at the 
General Theological Seminary in New 
York City in 1935. His father was The 
Rev. L. W. Blackwelder of Griffin, Ga., 
Rector of St. George's Church. 

The Rev. James B. Sill came to St. 
Luke's and the Church of The Re- 
deemer, Craggy, in 1937. In 1942 Fath- 
er Sill presented and had installed in St. 
Luke's a beautiful altar window in mem- 
ory of his father, The Rev. Thomas 
Henry Sill. It had been taken from St. 
Chrysostom's Chapel in New York 
where his father was rector. The win- 
dow is Christ blessing young children, 
and was dedicated by The Rt .Rev. Rob- 
ert E. Gribbin, then Bishop of the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina. Father 
Sill was greatly loved by the mission 
people, and made his way from one 
church to another on foot, through all 
seasons, having no car. He served faith- 
fully until 1944 when he retired. (His 
brother was for many years Headmas- 
ter at Kent School for Boys). 

The Rev. Dudley J. Stroup came to 
St. Luke's in 1944 and was there until 
1946. He was young and energetic and 
able to build up the congregation con- 
siderably, also organized a choir, assist- 
ed in excavating under the church for 
a recreation room and installing an oil 
furnace. During his stay electric lights 
were put in the church and recreation 
room. 

In November 1946 The Rev. West- 
well Greenwood came to St. Luke's and 



during his ministry there the church 
property was improved, water being put 
in the basement of the church, a sink 
installed and electric radiators were put 
in the church to supplement the oil heat 
when the weather was cold. The win- 
dows and front door were weather- 
stripped. It was then possible to serve 
meals in the recreation room, and sev- 
eral tables, chairs, hot plates, etc., were 
donated by members of the congrega- 
tion and friends. Father Greenwood 
resigned on June 30, 1948. 

Although there has been no regular 
priest at St. Luke's since July 1, 1948, 
there has been an 11:00 A. M. service 
every Sunday except two during the 
polio epidemic. Holy Communion Ser- 
vice on the 3rd Sunday of each month, 
The Rev. Arthur W. Farnum, or some 
other Priest officiating, lay readers be- 
ing furnished by Bishop Henry at all 
other times. 

In June 1950 Bishop Henry appoint- 
ed John McTammany Lay-Vicar-in- 
charge of St. Luke's and the Church of 
The Redeemer, Craggy. He and his 
family make their home in the rectory 
at The Redeemer. While studying for 
Holy Orders Mr. McTammany is ac- 
tively working in the two missions. 



S^™Bw*i?^i*lA^w-TW( 



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13 



THREE BISHOPS ORDAIN 
SONS TO MINISTRY 

Three Bishops of the Episcopal 
Church ordained their sons to the min- 
istry at a special service at Trinity 
Church here, when thirteen young men 
became deacons. 

Presiding Bishop Henry Knox Sher- 
rill ordained his son, Edmund; Bishop 
Malcolm E. Peabody of the Diocese of 
Central New York ordained his son 
George; and James Whittemore was or- 
dained by his father, Bishop Lewis 
Bliss Whittemore of the Diocese of 
Western Michigan. 

Another bishop's son ordained was 
Hikaru Yanagihara, whose father is 
Bishop Peter Yanagihara, of the Dio- 
cese of Osaka, Japan. 



CHURCHWOMEN TO WRITE 
ORIGINAL PROGRAMS 

New York — The Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Episcopal Church is seeking tal- 
ent inside the Auxiliary itself, for the 
purpose of writing meeting programs. 
Under the general title "The Steward- 
ship of Talent," it is asking women to 
write and submit programs of the kind 
they would like to see used in Auxiliary 
groups throughout the Church. In the 
invitation it is said that the plan will 
give women with a talent for creative 
writing an opportunity to contribute 
their talents to the work of the Church; 
that programs submitted will be indica- 
tive of the kind desired; that hidden 
ability will be disclosed. 



SKY VALLEY 

• Accredited preparatory school. 

• Teaches youth of today how to study, 
play, worship, and work in a whole- 
some farm home. 

• Atmosphere and influences of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

IAMES Y. PERRY, Director 

Sky Valley School Zirconia, N. C. 



LAYMAN'S TRAINING COURSE 

Bishop Henry and Mr. Richard N. 
Jones of Greenwich, Conn., led an all- 
day training course for laymen on Sep- 
tember 22nd, at Trinity Church, Ashe- 
ville. These are the laymen who will 
be visiting the Parishes and Missions 
throughout the Diocese in connection 
with the Every Member Canvass: 

L. K. Barber, Waynesville; Ed- 
win S. Hartshorn, Jr,. Lenoir; E. P. 
Dameron, Marion; Cecil Hoskins, Ashe- 
ville; R. J. Putnam, Asheville; Henry 
Bartol, Tryon; John L. Simmons, Ashe- 
ville; Ralph Ward, Fletcher; Cary 
Page, Tryon; Dr. C. D. Gerdes, Bilt- 
more Forest; A. C. Brown, Gastonia; E. 
L. Kemper, Shelby; Goodwyn Bloom- 
field, Wilkesboro. 



CLERGY CONFERENCE 

On September 10th, the Annual Fall 
Clergy Conference of the Diocese con- 
vened in St. Mary's Church, Asheville. 
After the celebration of the Holy 
Eucharist, Bishop Henry addressed the 
Clergy and lay workers stressing their 
obligation to men and women in the 
armed services and the boys and girls 
away at college. Immediately after the 
address a delicious lunch was served in 
Trinity Church. 

The afternoon session was devoted 
to the Every Member Canvass, under 
the leadership of the Rev. Gale D. 
Webbe, chairman of the Department of 
Promotion. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 



14 



BISHOP'S SCHEDULE 
October 14 — November 30 

Oct. 14 11:00 A. M. — Trinity Church, Spruce Pine, Confirmation. 

Oct. 16 11:00 A. M.— Meeting of the Board of Trustees, St. Mary's School and 
Junior College, Raleigh. 
7:00 P. M. — Executive Board of Kanuga, St. Martin's Church, Char- 
lotte. 

Oct. 17 9:00 A. M. — Meeting of the Bishops of the Carolina Dioceses, St. Mar- 
tin's Church, Charlotte. 

Oct. 13 7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's Church, Canton. 

Oct. 21 8:00 A. M. — Celebration of the Holy Communion, St. Luke's Church, 
Chunn's Cove. 
11:00 A. M. — St. James, Lenoir, Confirmation. 
7:30 P. M. — St. John's, Marion, Confirmation. 
Oct. 25 7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's, Canton. 
Oct. 26 8:00 P. M. — Youth Convention, Church of the Ascension, Hickory. 

Oct. 28 9:30 A. M.— St. Mary's Church, Quaker Meadows, Confirmation. 
11:00 A. M. — Grace Church, Morganton, Confirmation. 

3:00 P. M.- — St. Paul's Church, Burke County, Confirmation. 

5:00 P. M. — St. Stephen's, Morganton, Confirmation. 
Nov. 1 7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's Church, Canton. 

Nov. 4 8:00 A. M.- — Celebration of the Holy Communion, St. Luke's Church, 
Chunn's Cove. 
11:00 A. M. — Trinity Church, Asheville, Confirmation. 
8:00 P. M.— St. Francis' Church, Rutherfordton. 

— Woman's Aux. Dist. Meeting, St. John's Church, Marion. 

— Woman's Aux. District Meeting, Trinity Church, Spruce 
Pine. 
7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's Church, Canton. 

— 5th District Meeting of the Woman's Aux., St. Gabriel's, 
Rutherfordton. 
7:30 P. M.— St. Mary's, Blowing Rock. 

— Woman's Aux. Dist. Meeting, St. Francis', Cherokee. 

— Woman's Aux. Dist. Meeting, Grace Memorial Chapel, 
Asheville. 
7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's Church, Canton. 

9:00 A. M.- — Celebration of the Holy Communion, St. Andrew's 
Church, Canton. 
Nov. 18 11:00 A. M. — Grace Church in the Mountains, Waynesville. 
Nov. 18 P. M.— A. R. Morgan Field. 

Nov. 22 10:00 A. M.— Grace Memorial Chapel, Asheville. 

Nov. 25 11:00 A. M. — St. Luke's Church, Lincolnton, Confirmation. 
3:00 P. M.— Church of Our Saviour, Woodside. 

Nov. 29 10:30 A. M.— Meeting of the Appalachian School Board. 

15 



Nov. 


6 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


18 



PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

THEY HELP TO MAKE 

OUR MAGAZINE 

POSSIBLE 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT, Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 

WITH PRICE 

Patton Ave. Asheville 




A Church School of the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina. Accredited. Grades 6-12. 
Gymnasium, sports. 43rd year. 1300-acre 
estate. Board & Tuition moderate. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood. N. C. HEALTH 

PREPARATORY EDUCATION 

CHARACTER BUILDING 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Hymnal 1940 Companion; Book of Common 
Prayer; A Prayer Book for Soldiers and Sailors; Prayer Book Studies; 
Book of Offices; Stowe's Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Offers low cost insurance and annuity contracts to clergy, lay officials 
and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, and their 
immediate families. Services include individual insurance programming 
and assistance to parish officials in preparing and establishing plans 
for retirement of lay employees. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire, windstorm and extended coverage. Insurance on prop- 
erty owned by or closely affiliated with the Church, and on the resi- 
dences and personal property of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 

20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



{M|igf)lanti 
CJjttrcIjtnan 




VOL. XXII? %y, NOVEMBER. 1951 No. 12 



On Thanksgiving Day 

Support 

The Thompson Orphanage 

through your 
thankful prayers and gifts 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



®ije 2jtgtjlan& 
(Etjurrljmatt 

339 Charlotte St. Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western Nortli 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, The Rt. Rev. M. George 
I lenry, 46 Macon Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Win. M. 
Redwood. 20 Cedarcliff Road. Biltmore 
Forest. Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. Gale D. Webbe Editor 

The Rev. A-lark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Jackson Building. Asheville, N. C. 
Mrs. Fred Maiwurm Circ. Mgr. 

Albemarle Park, Asheville. N. C. 



Acts of God by which he has given 
unto us eternal Life. Third, we pray 
for the ministers of God's Church that 
they may be enabled to prepare all men 
for an intimate relation with God. Fin- 
ally, we pray that God in His Power 
will free us from the Power of Sin, that 
we may fulfill our destiny in a complete 
life in accordance with the will of God. 

Simply, Advent prepares us for a new 
relationship with the Incarnate Lord. 
The Church points out that we need 
God's grace to rid us of sin, to guide us 
in understanding His revelation of Him- 
self, to strengthen our ministry to His 
task, and to enable us to "run the race 
that is set before us." The greatest 
preparation for The Advent of Our 
Lord, is to acknowledge our need. 

Let us not become lost in the secular 
world and its commercialization. Let us 
truly prepare under the guidance of the 
Church, that when He shall come, we 
shall have our lamps brightly burning 
in welcome. 



ADVENT 

The Christian's concept of God has 
often been said to be that of a "Com- 
ing-At-You" God. By that is meant 
that the Christian does not feel that 
God waits for us to approach Him, but 
that God has come to us, and continues 
to seek out man, that He may lead him 
into the fullness of life for which he was 
created. 

The Church observes the special sea- 
son of Advent to remind us again of 
the entrance of God into human his- 
tory, and to give us a preparation sea- 
son that we may be able to receive God 
at His Coming. 

In the collects for the Sundays in Ad- 
vent the Church reminds us of what is 
necessary, if we are to be able to ful- 
fill God's purpose for us in intimate re- 
lation with him. First, we ask for God's 
grace to cast off all works of darkness. 
Second, we thank God for, and ask 
God's help in reading, the Holy Scrip- 
tures in which is recorded the mightv 



I AM YOUR PLEDGE 

I am many things — 
I am a Hymnal in a mission, 
The wine of Holy Communion, 
The Sacrament of marriage. 
The Confirmation of a child; 

I am needles and scissors. 
Gauze and cotton bandages, 
Crafts and sports, and baby clinics, 
And a class in Sunday School; 

I am love for the young 
And shelter for the old, 
Medicine for the sick, 
And comfort for the sorrowing; 

I am placed upon this altar 

From where I go to serve the Lord; 

I am evidence of your faith. 

By Rev. G. H. Murphy 




RECTOR AT ST. ANDREWS— The Rev. Roger 
Sherman of Franklin, Tenn., has accepted a call 
to St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. 

NEW RECTOR TO TAKE UP 
DUTIES AT ST. ANDREWS 

The Rev. Henry Roger Sherman, Jr., 
of Franklin, Tenn., and Mrs. Sherman 
are expected to take up residence in 
Canton about November 15, when the 
Rev. Mr. Sherman will assume his du- 
ties as rector of Saint Andrew's Mission. 

They come to Canton highly recom- 
mended both as church and civic leaders. 
Mr. Sherman has been rector at St. 
Paul's church in Franklin for four years, 
and prior to 1947, he was rector of St. 
John's church in Negaunee, Mich., for 
ten years. 

Born in Lawrence, N. Y., in 1898, Mr. 
Sherman began his education in a small 
private school in Glastonbury, Conn., 
but later transferred to the public 
schools. His ambition was to be a med- 
ical missionary but World War I inter- 
rupted his plans and he served for two 
years in the U. S. Army Medical corps. 

After the war, he entered the insur- 
ance business in Hartford, Conn., but 
his interest in the church was paramount 
and after considerable service as a lay 
reader, he gave up his position with the 



Aetna Life Insurance company and en- 
rolled in the Berkley Divinity school in 
Middletown, Conn., which later became 
affiliated with Yale University. He con- 
tinued his studies at DuBose Memorial 
church training school in Monteagle, 
Tenn., and after his graduation, served 
a mission in Plainsfield, Conn., before 
going to St. John's. 

While rector of St. John's he served 
in various capacities. He was a dele- 
gate to the General Convention and to 
the Provincial Synod; secretary of the 
Diocesan Convention and of the Dio- 
cese, as well as being secretary of the 
Standing Committee and a member of 
the Bishop and Council. While at 
Franklin he was elected to the Standing 
Committee of the Diocese. 

Mr. Sherman has always been inter- 
ested in military affairs. He served as 
chaplain of the 1st. Engineer Battalion, 
Michigan State Troops, during World 
War II. He now holds the rank of 
Colonel in the Chaplain Corps of the 
Tennessee State Troops Reserve. He 
is also chaplain of the Franklin Legion, 
and is a member of the Rotary club. 

Mrs. Sherman is active in the Wo- 
men's work of the church. She is Dio- 
cesian Secretary of Devotions for the 
Auxiliary; and historian for Old Glory 
Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution; and is affiliated with sev- 
eral civic and cultural clubs. 



"CORRECTION" 

In August 1951 issue, page 15, the 
word "conservatism" should be submit- 
ted for "conservation", in my article on 
"Forming the Missionary District of 
Asheville." Mr. Patton's advice to us 
as citizens of North Carolina was to pre- 
serve intact our "high calling of honest 
conservatism." — J. B. S. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at B elk's 



HEAR THE EPISCOPAL HOUR! 



DIOCESAN NEWS ASKED 



The Episcopal Hour, a transcribed ra- 
dio program, is broadcast by 160 radio 
stations comprising the Protestant Radio 
Conference network. The coverage ex- 
tends from Washington, D. C. to Miami, 
Fla., and westward into Oklahoma and 
Iowa. We have included in the network 
stations in San Juan, Puerto Rico and 
Manila, Philippine Islands. 

The Episcopal Hour was founded by 
Bishop John Moore Walker and is pro- 
duced by the Radio Committee of the 
Department of Promotion of the Fourth 
Province. It is supported financially by 
the fifteen Dioceses of the Fourth Prov- 
ince and in addition the Diocese of Vir- 
ginia, West Virginia, Southwestern Vir- 
ginia, Southern Virginia, Arkansas, 
Texas, West Texas, and North Texas. 
The recordings are all made in the stu- 
dios of the Protestant Radio Center lo- 
cated at Agnes Scott College, Atlanta. 

The music on the 1951 series is a 
contribution of the choirs of the Cathed- 
ral of St. Philip and All Saints' Church, 
Atlanta, St. James' Church, Marietta, 
and the University of the South, Se- 
wanee. 

Copies of the sermons preached on 
The Episcopal Hour may be had upon 
request. Address all requests and in- 
quiries to: Episcopal Hour Headquar- 
ters, Mrs. Emmett Rakestraw, Secre- 
tary, 2744 Peachtree Road, Atlanta. 



PENLAND. N. C. 

Country Boarding and Day School of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
for boys and girls ages six to twelve. 
Grammar grades one through six. 

For catalogue address 

The Rev'd. P. W. LAMBERT. Jr.. O.G.S. 

RECTOR 



At a recent meeting of the Executive 
Board of the Woman's Auxiliary the fol- 
lowing resolution was passed: "It is the 
hope of the Executive Board that fu- 
ture editions of the Highland Church- 
man will carry more Diocesan — rather 
than National — news". 

The editor shares this hope, and 
urges herewith that parish and mission 
publicity representatives keep him in- 
formed of activities on the home front. 
News items should be sent, not later 
than the 20th of the month that precedes 
the month of publication, to the Rev. 
Gale D. Webbe, 339 Charlotte Street, 
Asheville. 

Incidentally, does your congregation 
have a publicity representative? And 
does the Highland Churchman regularly 
receive your parish bulletin? 



CLERICAL CHANGE 

On November 15, the Rev. R. Y. 
Winter, Jr., became Priest-in-Charge of 
the Church of the Messiah, Murphy; 
St. Barnabas, Murphy; and the Chapel 
of the Holy Comforter, Andrews. 

Mr. Winters was formerly Priest-in- 
Charge of the Church of the Transfig- 
uration, Bat Cave. 

His successor has not yet been an- 
nounced. 



FROM HOLY CROSS, TRYON 
Mrs. C. P. Burnett 

We extend our deepest sympathy to 
the Rev. C. P. Burnett and to the 
Clingan family in the loss of their wife 
and sister, Helen May Burnett. Mrs. 
Burnett was for many years a loyal and 
devoted member of this parish, and will 
long- be remembered for her services. 



ARRIVALS 

Michael Lemon Jenkins was born on 
October 15. He is, of course, the son 
of the Rev. and Mrs. Mark Jenkins, of 
Fletcher. 

The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. M. George 
Henry announce the birth of a daughter, 
Elizabeth Harding, on October 26th. 






WOMAN'S AUXILIARY PAGE 

By Mrs. R. M. Starrett, 520 Lenoir Street, 
Morganton, N. C, Promotion Secretary. 

Kanuga Reminder 

Those of you who attended the an- 
nual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
last summer will remember that the 
following resolution was adopted by the 
delegates: 

"Whereas, the Kanuga Conferences 
are of inestimable value, not only in the 
owning diocese but throughout the 
church and, 

Whereas, there is very limited income 
for the general operation of the Kanuga 
Conference property; 

Be it resolved, that each Branch of 
the Woman's Auxiliary be urged to put 
an item in its budget each year for 
Kanuga." 

Accordingly, as the time approaches 
for preparing your 1952 budget — re- 
member Kanuga. 

American Bible Society 

The purpose of the American Bible 
Society is to make the Bible available 
to everyone and to encourage its use. 
The Society publishes many types of 
Bibles: some — in large, clear print — are 
designed particularly for those with lim- 
ited vision; other small booklets, con- 
taining well known and valued portions 
of the scriptures, are designed for men 
in service. Thus the Society aims at 
publishing Bibles to suit the needs of the 
individual or group. These publications 
are sold at cost and can be obtained in 
several languages. 
A Prayer for the Church* 

Quicken, O Lord, we beseech thee, all 
the members of thy Church, that they 
may be alive to the opportunities and 
responsibilities of these times. Save us 
from complacency and from fear of new 
ways; inspire our minds with the vis- 
ion of a world won for thee, and stir 
our wills to pray and to work until thy 
will be done on earth as it is in heaven. 

*Taken from "Prayers for All Oc- 
casions" published by the Forward 
Movement Publications. 



United Thank Offering 

The Auxiliary members of St. James', 
Hendersonville, sponsored a poster con- 
test in an effort to stimulate interest and 
participation in the United Thank Of- 
fering which was presented on Septem- 
ber 28th. Ten members of St. James's 
youth group entered the contest. The 
results were very gratifying in that a 
large number of women attended the 
Corporate Communion and took part 
in the offering. 

Spruce Pine Auxiliary 

The October meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of Trinity Mission of Spruce 
Pine, was held at the "Pines" in Penland 
with Miss Lucy Morgan and Mrs. How- 
ard Ford as hostesses. 

Mrs. R. T. Dent, Chairman, made a 
report on the Corporate Communion 
celebrated on St. Michael and All Angels' 
Day in the chapel of Trinity Mission 
by the Rev. Peter Lambert. There were 
eight members of the Auxiliary present 
and a collection of $39.56 was made. 

Arrangements were made for the 
Third District meeting of the Auxiliary, 
to be held at Trinity Mission on No- 
vember 7th. 

A letter from Mrs. G. W. Bohnsdahl, 
Supply Secretary of the Diocese, was 
read. Donations of clothing and money 
were made by individual members for 
the three missions to which supplies are 
to be sent by the diocese at this time. 

Miss Ruth Johnston, Church Period- 
ical Chairman, made a report for her 
committee. Several hundred magazines 
had been distributed by members. It 
was voted that a donation of three dol- 
lars be made to the Church Book Fund. 

Many details about the church bazaar 
in November were worked out by com- 
mittees. 

A guest at Penland at this time is 
Sister Christina of the Order of the 
Transfiguration. She gave a most in- 
teresting talk about the founding and 
the fine work done by her order. 

— Mrs. R. W. Ewing, Treas. 



NONAH CRAFT CENTER 

The Editor was interested in the fol- 
lowing article which appeared in the 
Sunday edition of the Asheville Citizen- 
Times on October 28th. It is with re- 
gret that he announces the resignation 
of Miss Francis Barr who has been di- 
rector of this work for three years. Miss 
Barr will reside in Sylva: 

The Nonah Craft Center in the Car- 
toogechaye community sponsored by St. 
John's Episcopal Church of Cartooge- 
chaye, has done much to create a hap- 
pier community life for many of Macon 
County's women as it works in conjunc- 
tion with the Home Demonstration clubs 
work. 

Each craft leader in the Home Dem- 
onstration clubs has an opportunity of 
receiving careful training at this center, 
with Miss Frances Barr and Miss Sally 
Kesler as trained instructors, and they 
in turn carry their work back to their 
various clubs. Thus many rural women 
are greatly benefitting by the work of 
these leaders. 

Among some of the work under way 
and some completed is that of preparing 
native articles, such as honeysuckle, 
broom sedge and shucks to be used at 
the schools. One leader made a bag of 
honeysuckle and handwoven linen to be 
carried with summer apparel, one leader 
wove a lamp shade of broom sedge, and 
this material can also be used as table 
mat as well; another leader bought an 
old lamp shade frame and made a 
parchment shade with dried grasses and 
flowers between the pieces of parchment. 

Braiding rugs is an art perfected by 
Mrs. Fred Wood, craft leader of Walnut 
Creek. She has instructed many club 
members to make attractive rugs from 
discarded fabrics. 

Nonah Craft Center has eight looms 
available for the members to work on. 
Some are weaving luncheon mats for 
Christmas presents, others are making 
hooked rugs, creating their own beauti- 
ful designs, and others doing various 
things in handicraft. 

While this craft center is open every 
Tuesday for those who are interested 



in handciraft work, the special leader 
training makes these instructions avail- 
able to all communities in the county. 

Youth Convention 

The Annual Convention of the Young 
Churchmen of the diocese met in the 
Church of the Ascension in Hickory on 
October 26th and 27th. From all re- 
ports the youngsters had a wonderful 
and inspirational time. There was danc- 
ing, good food, marvelous hospitality, 
reports from all the representatives and 
a talk by the Bishop. 

There were approximately 75 in at- 
tendance and the following officers were 
elected: 

Bill Brackett, Edneyville, President. 

John Saunders., Asheville, Vice-Pres- 
ident. 

Sheldon Campbell, Biltmore, Secre- 
tary. 

Francis Martin, Black Mountain, 
Youth Editor of the Highland Church- 
man. 

David Reid, Asheville, Provincial 
Youth Representative. 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins, Rector of 
the Church of Fletcher, is the Advisor 
of the Provincial Youth Conference. 

It was decided the St. James Church 
in Hendersonville will be the host for 
next year. 

Holy Cross, Tryon 

The St. Agnes Guild of the Church of 
the Holy Cross, Tryon, held its annual 
Christmas Bazaar on November 14th, 
in the Parish House. The Bazaar cul- 
minated year-long sewing and working 
by the members of the Guild, which en- 
abled them to present many unusual and 
beautiful items for the Christmas shop- 
per's list. 



St. Mary's, Asheville 

An Open House was held at the Rec- 
tory of St. Mary's Church on November 
the 11th. The Rector and his family 
are happy to be in residence again after 
six months of absence, due to the com- 
plete renovation and redecoration of the 
Rectory. 



DR. AUCOCK HONORED 

A delegation of fourteen people — 
members of All Saints' Church, Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island — made a round 
trip of over two thousand miles to join 
in honoring the Rev. Dr. Arthur Mor- 
gan Aucock on the occasion of his nine- 
tieth birthday and the sixtieth anni- 
versary of his ordination to the sacred 
priesthood. Dr. Aucock, who now lives 
in Asheville, spent his entire ministry 
at All Saints' Church, Providence, and 
has been rector emeritus since 1932. 

Mr. Harold Cory was toastmaster at 
the testimonial banquet given Dr. Au- 
cock at the Biltmore Forest Country 
Club. Addresses were made by the 
Rev. I. N. Northup, rector of All Souls' 
Church, Biltmore; by the Rev. John B. 
Lyte, present rector of All Saints' 
Church, Providence; by Bishop Henry; 
and by Dr. Aucock himself, in response 
to the affectionate greetings tendered 
him. 

Dr. Aucock's friends joined in pre- 
senting him with a television set as a 
birthday-ordination present. 



A MESSAGE FROM THE 
UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

October 10 was Founders' Day of the 
University of the South : a day, this year, 
marking the ninety-first anniversary of 
the laying of the University's corner- 
stone. 

On a sunny October afternoon in 1860, 
5.000 people gathered on the mountain 
top to watch Bishop Leonidas Polk of 
Louisiana lay the cornerstone, and to 
see Bishop Elliott of Georgia place 
within it a copy of the Bible, the Book 
of Common Prayer, and the Consti- 
tution of the United States, dedicating 
the University to the glory of God as 
"an institution established for the culti- 
vation of true religion, learning, and vir- 
tue." 

Today, as a citadel of liberal Christian 
education in an age dominated by the 
secular, the University of the South 
needs increasingly the support of every 



faithful Churchman. We will do well to 
remember the aspirations of our found- 
ers, and to mark these 1946 words of 
Dr. Edward McCardy: "It seems to me 
that there is no more important project 
in American education that the provis- 
ion of the highest quality of liberal edu- 
cation in a distinctly Christian environ- 
ment. There is probably no religious 
group that exceeds the Episcopal Church 
in distinction for a long history of high 
education combined with liberal doc- 
trine: therefore there is probably no 
other Church so eminently fitted to 
sponsor such a University. Sewanee is 
today the only University in America 
owned and operated by the Episcopal 
Church, and therefore it seems to me 
to be the most important educational 
project I know anything about." 

A Fellowship for graduate study in 
social work has been set up by Trinity 
Parish. New York City, as a memorial 
to Mr. and Mrs. John M. Glenn. The 
fellowship has been given to Episcopal 
Service for Youth. First award goes 
to Rita Wilkins of Burlingame, Cali- 
fornia, who will enter the New York 
School of Social Work and Windham 
House. 

Candidates must be members of the 
Episcopal Church, college graduates, and 
accepted for admission to a recognized 
school of social work. 



HERE WE OFFER AND PRESENT 

"As I get it", said my friend, "Chris- 
tians began to give each other presents 
at Christmas because it's the time when 
God gave Himself to us all. I don't see 
how anybody can understand the Chris- 
tian Faith unless he knows what it means 
to give and receive out of love for some- 
body else. 

"In thinking about my pledge, it 
seems to me that this whole business 
of apportionments and budgets is 
wrong. There's no love in it. 'We must 
have so much for the budget,' says the 
Diocese to our parish. And the parish 
says the same thing to us. So we make a 
pledge on the basis of what we've been 



asked for. And we call this our offering 
our present — to Our Lord. 

"This certainly isn't the way I give 
Christmas presents. I don't give my 
children bread, butter and shoes, as 
'presents'. I owe them these. And they 
don't have to tell me I owe them these, 
either. I figure it out for myself. I plan 
their share in advance, so they'll never 
have to ask for their needs. My gifts 
are in addition to these, and it often 
takes real sacrifice to give presents to 
those I love. 

"For Old Testament Jews it was easy. 
They gave a tenth of their incomes, and 
this covered taxes, charities and Church. 
But my world is a different one, so I 
have to figure God's Share differently, 
too. 

"The way I give now, I'm just kidding 
myself if I think that I'm giving God 
presents. But if I pledged in proportion 
to my income, I'd at least be giving God 
back what is His. True gifts would come 
after this. 

"Two phrases now have new meaning 
for me: 'Here we offer and present unto 
Thee, Lord, ourselves . . .' and 'We 
beseech Thee to accept this our reason- 
able duty and service . . . ' 

"This year my pledge will be differ- 
ent." 

{From the Diocese of Maryland) 



SLOW PAYMENTS THREATEN 
CHURCH'S PROGRAM 

At present, payments to the National 
Council for 1951 are a quarter of a mil- 
lion dollars less than for the correspond- 
ing period of 1950. The total remitted 
by the Dioceses during the current year 
is #160,000.00 less than the amount 
which should have been received for the 
first nine months of 1951. While recog- 
nizing that the current payments re- 
flect the lower receipts of the summer 
months, nevertheless the comparison 
with last year is alarming. It would be 
a tragedy if, instead of the advance we 
have hoped the year would mark, we 
ended 1951 with a serious deficit. 

The members of the National Council 
call on every Diocese and District, every 



Parish and Mission, every Diocesan and 
Parish Treasurer, every man and wo- 
man, to bring all contributions to the 
missionary work up to date as soon as 
possible, and to maintain regular pay- 
ments in full until the end of the year. 
A loyal response will enable us to 
achieve the new record which the year 
1951 has promised and will give our 
valiant missionaries the support they so 
richly deserve in their service for Christ 
throughout the world. 



"QUOTES" 

If the job of Christian Education is 
to make Redemption real so that through 
a new relationship with God the deepest 
needs of our lives are met, then some- 
thing more is needed by the Episcopal 
Church than some new Sunday School 
lessons. 

Since the secret of the Power of the 
Christian religion to help us can be found 
only in a new, living, personal relation- 
ship with God, then it is clear why our 
religion is meaningless to so many 
Church members. Our Christian Edu- 
cation has been contended to give a very 
superficial instruction in a few isolated 
facts about religion. It has done little 
to create this needed "Living Relation- 
ship" with God. The life of redeemed 
relationship can not be learned solely 
in a Sunday School class. Redemption 
is learned by sharing in the redee?ning 
relationships within a truly Christian 
home and within the life of a truly re- 
ligious parish family. 

The Sunday School is the chief sup- 
plement to both of these. The real job 
of Christian Education in our commun- 
ion is to help Episcopal families create 
the relationships of a truly Christian 
home and the leaders of parishes to 
create truly Christian relationships 
among its members. By living and shar- 
ing in these Christian relationships day 
by day, year by year children and adults 
find religion meaningful and the help it 
gives them real. 

From The Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



KANUGA CONFERENCES — HIGH- 
LIGHTS OF BOARD MEETING- 
NEW CONFERENCES FOR 1952 

Kanuga will add two entirely new 
conferences in its 1952 program, accord- 
ing to action taken at the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors held re- 
cently in Charlotte, N. C. This forward 
step will extend the effective influence 
of the Kanuga Conference by filling 
needs not now being adequately met by 
diocesan camps, according to the Chair- 
man of the Board, the Rt. Rev. M. 
George Henry. 

A Leadership Training Conference for 
Youth will draw officers of youth groups 
from all over the south for training in 
the art of leadership and for exchange 
of ideas. A one week intensive leader- 
ship course will give not only great in- 
spiration for enthusiastic effort on the 
"home front" but also the techniques for 
effective effort. Closely integrated will 
be a conference for adult counselors of 
youth groups. 

The second new conference will be a 
Family Conference, drawing together 
family groups for a week of Christian 
fellowship. The program will be coordi- 
nated with the Department of Religious 
Education's emphasis on the family as 
the unit in religious education. 

The Board of Directors heard reports 
on the generally successful 1951 season. 

Mr. William L. Balthis, of Gastonia, 
presented the report of the Kanuga 
Foundation Committee, of which he is 
Chairman. The work of this committee 
resulted, after much discussion, in defi- 
nite plans for a campaign to be held 
during the fall of 1952. A considerable 
sum is needed to renovate the Kanuga 
property which has suffered in recent 
years from inadequate maintenance 
funds. 

The Board Meeting was attended by 
all five of the Bishops representing the 
five owning dioceses; the Rt. Rev. M. 
George Henry of Asheville, N. C, Chair- 
man of the Board; the Rt. Rev. Thomas 
N. Carruthers, of Charleston, S. C, 
Vice-Chairman; the Rt. Rev. Edwin A. 
Penick of Raleigh, N. C; the Rt. Rev. 



John J. Gravatt of Columbia, S. C, and 
the Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright of Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

CONSECRATION OF A BISHOP 

On St. Matthew's Day, 1951, in Holy 
Trinity Church, West Palm Beach, the 
Reverend Martin Julius Bram was con- 
secrated Bishop in the Church of God 
to serve as Suffragan Bishop of the Dio- 
vese of South Florida. The Consecrator 
was the Rt. Rev. Henry I. Louttit, Bish- 
op of the Diocese, and the Co-consecra- 
tors were the Rt. Rev. C. Avery Mason, 
Bishop of Dallas, and the Rt. Rev. 
Spence Burton, S. S. J. E., Bishop of 
Nassau. 

East and west were united, for the Rt. 
Rev. Francis Eric Bloy, Bishop of Los 
Angeles, flew to West Palm Beach to 
preach the sermon. 

The event served as a reunion for the 
new Bishop and Bishop Bloy who had 
long been friends and one-time class- 
mates. Also, of interest is the fact that 
Bishop Loutitt, Bishop Mason and Bish- 
op Bram were fellow-students at the 
Virginia Theological Seminary. Another 
classmate who served as Deputy Regis- 
trar was the Very Rev. Frederick War- 
necke, Dean of the Cathedral in Newark, 
New Jersey. 




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ELECTION 

Harry M. Addinsell of New York, 
was elected Treasurer to succeed Rus- 
sell E. Dill who died recently. The 
election was by the National Council, 
to fill an unexpired term, and the term 
will run until the next General Conven- 
tion. 

Mr. Addinsell has been a member of 
the National Council, and of its De- 
partments of Finance and Promotion. 
He is a Director of the Episcopal Church 
Foundation. His experience is largely 
in the field of investment brokerage, 
from which he retired some time ago. 
He has been president and later chair- 
man of the board of the First Boston 
Corporation. He is a director of Phillips 
Petroleum Co., the Commercial Credit 
Corporation and the Virginian Railway. 

Mr. Addinsell is a trustee of Teachers 
Insurance and Annuity Association, 
chairman of the board, New York Boy 
Scouts of America, trustee and treasurer 
of the North Country Community Hos- 
pital, Glen Cove, a trustee of St. Luke's 
Home for Aged Women, and of the es- 
tates and property Committee of the 
Diocese of New York. He is a vestryman 
of St. Bartholomew's Church, New York 
and St. Paul's, Glen Cove, L. I. 



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George F. Wiese, Supt. 

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THIS SPACE IS DONATED BY A FREE 

ENTERPRISE BUSINESS WHICH 

BELIEVES THAT .... 

1. This nation is great because its people were endowed by their creator 
with certain inalienable rights. 

2. Since these rights are now in jeopardy because of misguided lead- 
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social, and economic life. 

3. The Church is the real opponent of Communism and must be 
strengthened by our active support. 



10 



THE BISHOP'S SCHEDULE 
November 15 Through December 31 

Nov. 15 7:30 P. M.— St. Andrew's Church, Canton 

Nov. 18 11:00 A. M. — Grace Church in the Mountains, Waynesville 

11:00 P. M.— St. Francis' Church. Cherokee 

11:00 P. M.— St. Agnes' Church, Franklin 
Nov. 22 10:00 A. M.— Grace Memorial Church, Asheville 
Nov. 25 8:00 A. M.— St. Luke's Church, Chunn's Cove 

10:00 A. M.— Address Bible Class, Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek 
7:30 P. M. — Church of the Good Shepherd, Covington, Ga. 
Nov. 29 Appalachian School Board 

Dec. 1 2:00 P. M. — Christ Church, Charlotte, Laying of Corner Stone 
Dec. 2 9:30 A. M.— St. Mary's Church, Asheville 

7:30 P. M.— St. Matthias' Church, Aoccoa, Ga. 
Dec. 4 Morganton Convocation, Shelby. Quiet Day 

Dec. 5 Asheville Convocation, Asheville 

Dec. 6 12:00 M. — Valle Crucis Board Meeting, Boone 
Dec. 8 Chapel Hill 

11:00 P. M.— Canterbury Club 
Dec. 10 Chapel Hill 

Dec. 11 8:00 P. M. — Grace Church in the Mountains. Women's Aux. Meeting 
Dec. 16 11:00 A. M.— St Philip's Church, Brevard 

4:30 P. M.— Highland Hospital 
Dec. 23 11:00 A. M.— Church of the Holy Cross, Tryon 
Dec. 24 

Dec. 25 11:00 A. M.— St. Luke's Church, Chunn's Cove 
Dec. 30 11:00 A. M.— Church of the Redeemer, Shelby 

1 1 :00 P. M. — St Andrew's Church, Bessemer City 

11:00 P. M.— St. John's Church, High Shoals 




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TRINITY CHURCH, Ashevlle, N. C. 

Church and Aston Streets 

Holy Communion each Sunday at 8 A. M., 
also at 11 A. M. on first Sunday. Morning 
Prayer and Sermon, 11 A. M. Church School, 
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"THE FAITH OF THE CHURCH" 

The third volume in THE 
CHURCH'S TEACHING series— "The 
Faith of the Church" — is now available, 
and may be ordered from the National 
Council, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York 
10, at $1.50 a copy. 

"The Faith of the Church" is a book 
about theology for the intelligent lay- 
man. "In this book", the authors point 
out in their preface, "we have sought to 
state as directly and plainly as possible 
the elements of the Christian Faith 'as 
this Church hath received the same', and 
as this Faith is expressed in The Book of 
Common Prayer. 

"We have organized the book around 
the articles of the Christian Creeds, 
treating them as windows through 
which the Faith may be seen." 

Bishop Sherrill says of this book, 
"Every Churchman should read and 
study this fine exposition of the faith. 
A product of the thinking of many 
scholars, it is well written by two of 
them, and marks another forward step 
in our program of Christian Education." 

Auxiliaries, Men's Clubs, and other 
parish groups may well find that this 
book is the perfect basis for study-ses- 
sions during Lent, or at any time. And 
surely every earnest Churchman will 
want not simply to own a copy, but to 
"read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest" 
its contents. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 1 2th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 






Bridgeport National 
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